HMV hit by World Cup fever

first_img whatsapp More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.com KCS-content Show Comments ▼ Thursday 9 September 2010 8:28 pm Sharecenter_img HMV hit by World Cup fever whatsapp ENTERTAINMENT company HMV has said that this summer’s World Cup triggered a 14.9 per cent fall in sales in the UK and Ireland.The firm said potential customers had spurned DVDs, CDs and books to watch the football, hitting the figures which covered the 19 weeks to September.HMV, which owns the Waterstone’s chain, has based its strategy on the growth of live store events and ticketing, as well as a revival in Waterstone’s book sales.It said these factors and a stronger product line-up, particularly in games, could deliver a successful Christmas.At HMV International, which includes HMV stores in Canada, Hong Kong and Singapore, like-for-likes sales were down eight per cent.HMV group chief executive Simon Fox said: “We continue to make good progress on all three parts of our strategy. The initiatives to strengthen our specialist positioning, localise our store offer and revitalise our market leading brand have had a positive impact on trading.”HMV also said that plans were well advanced to operate three further music festivals in the summer of 2011. The company also announced that its group finance director, Neil Bright, would leave the firm in December to join Holidaybreak. Meanwhile, HMV group chairman Robert Swannell will take over as chairman of Marks & Spencer from Sir Stuart Rose in January 2011. Video Carousel – cityam_native_carousel – 426 00:00/00:50 LIVERead More Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastUndoBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeUndomoneycougar.comThis Proves The Osmonds Weren’t So Innocentmoneycougar.comUndoTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island FarmUndothedelite.comNetflix Cancellations And Renewals: The Full List For 2021thedelite.comUndoinvesting.comCanceled TV Shows Announced: Full Updated Listinvesting.comUndoWorld LifestyleCouple Has No Idea Why Photo Goes Viral, Then They Notice This In The CornerWorld LifestyleUndoFilm OracleHer Love Triangle Inspired 3 Of The Most Popular Songs Ever WrittenFilm OracleUndoYeah MotorCheck Out These Car Wraps, 20 Car Wraps That Had Us LaughingYeah MotorUndo Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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WPP beats forecasts after strong US performance

first_imgFriday 4 March 2011 2:57 am More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.com whatsapp Share Show Comments ▼ whatsapp John Dunne WPP beats forecasts after strong US performance A rebound in the United States advertising market allowed WPP, the world’s largest ad group, to follow its peers and post strong full-year results on Friday and a solid outlook for 2011.WPP, whose ad agencies include JWT and Ogilvy & Mather, posted fourth quarter organic revenue growth of 8.5 per cent and said the solid performance had continued into January with revenue up over 8 percent.The strong finish to the year, which had been expected after rivals Omnicom and Publicis posted better than expected results, helped WPP to post a full-year figure of 5.3 per cent, with both the fourth quarter and full-year figures ahead of forecasts.For 2011 it expects the key industry metric of like-for-like growth, which strips out the impact of acquisitions and currency moves, of five per cent and operating margins to rise 0.5 margin points to 13.7 per cent.Analysts had expected Martin Sorrell’s firm to report quarter four growth of 7.3 per cent and full-year growth of 4.9 per cent although expectations had risen after US group Omnicom and France’s Publicis reported strong trading.A solid update by another peer Interpublic and reports from media groups that ad markets were growing strongly has added to the sense in recent weeks that the industry is well into a recovery from one of the toughest downturns in recent history.WPP’s performance was boosted by the rebound in the US, continued growth in China, its strong presence in the digital market and an overall drive by fast moving consumer goods companies to increase their marketing spend.For 2011 it expects organic revenue growth of around five per cent, in line with forecasts.Overall reported revenue was up 7.4 per cent to £9.3bn, compared with an analyst forecast of £9.2bn. It also said it would target a divided pay-out ratio of around 40 per cent over the medium term from around 30 per cent Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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Tripple Gee and Company Plc (TRIPPL.ng) 2006 Annual Report

first_imgTripple Gee and Company Plc (TRIPPL.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Technology sector has released it’s 2006 annual report.For more information about Tripple Gee and Company Plc (TRIPPL.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Tripple Gee and Company Plc (TRIPPL.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Tripple Gee and Company Plc (TRIPPL.ng)  2006 annual report.Company ProfileTripple Gee & Company Plc manufactures and sells paper and packaging products in Nigeria and specialising in printing financial instruments and security documents. The company services the banking, oil and gas, pharmaceutical and FMCG sectors as well as government regulatory bodies. Security documents include MICR encoded and personalised cheques, dividend warrants, share certificates, ballot papers and election stationary as well as licenses and permits, customs revenue collection forms and receipts, statement of accounts, utility bills and pension contributions. Tripple Gee & Company Plc also offers packaging and labeling products which includes pharmaceutical labels, anti-counterfeit labels and packaging labels such as printed nylon, BOPP, PVC and shrink packaging products. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Tripple Gee & Company Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Hitting the Bottle: An Investigation into Alcohol Issues in Rugby

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Hitting the Bottle: An Investigation into Alcohol Issues in RugbyJAMES HOLBECK played for the Wallabies seven times. But while his injury-hit career ended early, who knows what the centre could have done had it not been for one person: his alter ego ‘Mad Jimmy’.After a few run-ins earlier in his career, he recalls an incident in 1997 when his Test aspirations were directly affected.“I was warned by Rod Macqueen on a Wallaby trip to South America not to go out in the week of selection,” he says.“Unfortunately I compromised on the very thing I’d dreamt of my whole life – playing for Australia – to go out for a few drinks… Which meant I walked into the hotel as the sun was rising. I was ultimately sent home from the tour.”Self-control was hard for Holbeck to master. Now 44 and teetotal, he helps young players prepare to transition out of the game, working with Rugby Union Players Australia (RUPA). He’s had time to consider why his lifestyle went the way it did.Related: A special podcast on our alcohol investigationHe explains: “At first, alcohol was something I used to feel more confident, then to be someone else, then to escape the pain of heartache. Then it simply became the role friends expected me to play.”It all came to a head when his playing days were over, as he wrestled with the ghosts of unfulfilled dreams. “I had a particularly ugly night out which left me needing a trip to hospital. The next week a friend pulled me aside and said: ‘Mate, you’re like a dancing monkey that people wind up with alcohol and watch dance ‘til you fall over. Then they laugh at you’.”There were other incidents Holbeck is ashamed of. The brutal truth was what he needed. Mad Jimmy was resigned to the trash. Now he educates young people about the impact of their choices and the fact that they even have any.Back in 2002: James Holbeck in action for the BrumbiesBecause youngsters can feel helpless. And there are some elite players who will be battling through this themselves.This article is not meant as an attack on alcohol – we believe in the sanctity of the clubhouse, team bonding and players letting off steam. Indeed, most months we review beer and promote days out in our Welcome To My Club feature. No one is quoted here preaching for abstinence. Nor will you see us slamming drinking in stadiums.The intention of this report is to make you aware that some stars have serious struggles with the bottle. And to inform you of what help is or isn’t out there.Because suffering alone can be hell.UNDER THE SURFACEHINTING AT a dark trade, one medic who has worked across professional sport tells Rugby World, anonymously: “Mixed into the bog-standard, end-of-season press release I have seen players who have had issues with drink or drugs being described as having a ‘bad back’ or a chronic issue.“I’ve seen players who have gone into rehab and been transferred (to other teams). I’m not entirely sure how well disclosed their medical history has been. This is in union and league.”While no one wants players’ personal medical history to be shared freely, we are being told there is pressure to axe some with a drink problem as soon as possible. No time to fix the human being, a bad few clubs have punted the issue.The medic continues: “It’s not ‘let’s look after the player’. It’s ‘let’s ignore and bin them off as soon as we can’. It’s treated like an infectious disease. They think it’s like chickenpox and everyone can catch it. So (teams) end up doing entirely the wrong thing, isolating the player and making them more lonely, which will never solve the problem.“It’s caveat emptor – ‘buyer beware’. The (old) club has no undertaking to declare anything. Medical history comes directly from the player and everything else you’d hope is caught in a medical.“But there are some things you wouldn’t routinely look for. Some people outsource medicals and are mainly interested in hearts, lungs, joints and scars – things that are fairly obvious and light up for you, in terms of checking for insurance purposes.“You wouldn’t normally test for liver function or take a hair or urine sample and dip for drugs. Because it’s expensive, all of these things. You’re more worried that someone’s knee is going to be dodgy or that they can’t flex a hip or raise their arm above their head.“These are things people are worried about, rather than any addiction.”With this we step into the national discussion on mental health. Addiction or alcohol dependency issues must be considered a mental health problem. But still for so many out there, drinking to excess is simply weakness.Physical challenge: Tom Fitzsimons has run across the United StatesPromoting any alternative view begins with accepting that rugby players are not superheroes. All last season, motivational speaker Tom Fitzsimons was addressing Premiership clubs on behalf of the Rugby Players’ Association (RPA) about his experiences with alcohol addiction. He also mentors a handful of anonymous elite rugby players.Fitzsimons says: “We have to be careful that we don’t take away the mystique of a rugby player, but we also need to get across that these men are flawed like any other man.”According to the NHS’s Statistics on Alcohol, England 2018, in 2016-17, some 80,000 people were treated for problematic drinking alone.In May a joint report from Alcohol Concern and Alcohol Research UK stated: “It is estimated that around 595,000 people in England alone are dependent on alcohol and in need of specialist support. But only around 108,000 are receiving treatment for their alcohol dependency. This has a significant impact not only on the individual but on their families; around 200,000 children live in a household with an alcohol-dependent carer.”Alcohol-education charity Drinkaware also state on their site that “the NHS estimates that just under one in ten (8.7%) men in the UK and one in 20 (3.3%) UK women show signs of alcohol dependence.” Whichever number you pick, alcohol dependency and misuse is not something to be sniffed at. Are we to believe that elite sportspeople sidestep this national trend completely?Coming to a head: How many players suffer in silence?When Fitzsimons speaks, his story is arresting. He is brutally detailed in the description of his horrors. He tells of setting out to prove he was tougher than his father, who died of alcohol poisoning at 39, following a rare foray into drinking. And how he dived headlong into a heavy-drinking culture at 14. He rattles off a catalogue of incidents from his time as a “horrible, violent drunk”.Despite having a good job in the construction industry, it all finally came crashing down for him at 31, when he found his bank account empty and his partner, who had tolerated so much hell, finally decided to leave with the kids.Forced to face reality, he got fit – training for physical feats became the way he filled the afternoons that had been spent in the pub before – and decided to be honest about his past. Three years into sobriety, he did a presentation for a group of ‘troublemakers’ in a Barnsley school.He saw that his story had hit home.After then talking at Super League’s Warrington Wolves, CEO Karl Fitzpatrick saw the impact of his words and passed Fitzsimons’s details on to the RPA.Related: Rugby World’s investigationsExplaining one of the myriad reasons why elite sportspeople could turn to the bottle to cope, Fitzsimons talks of the “bridge of expectation” – when so much is expected of you, but your sense of self-worth is so far below that level of external belief, something has to give.“My bridge of expectation was so high, I self-destructed and drank myself into oblivion,” he says before giving an example from rugby. “I heard about this player who was put forward to play at international level and he just completely blew up. People thought it would be exactly what he needed.“In fact, it was the worst thing you could have done to him because you hadn’t built up his confidence. That’s what we’ve got to work on. We have to work on the player’s self-belief, rather than everyone’s expectations of them.”Fitzsimons knows there is a lot more to it than just that. Dr Philip Hopley is a consultant psychiatrist and the managing director of Cognacity, who run the 24-hour helpline for RPA members concerned about their mental wellbeing. He lays out some reasons.“In this kind of space we’re often seeing individuals who might be self-medicating (for) some kind of emotional stress or life challenge,” he says. “So they don’t like the way that they’re feeling and transition would be a very common life situation.“That might be dealing with injury, retiring from the sport, moving from one club to another, going through a process where you are working your way back or maybe you’ve been deselected, and those sorts of triggers can cause unpleasant emotions.“A lot of young men struggle with their emotional vocabulary and guess what, they’ve had social experiences in the past where they drink a few units of alcohol which tends to help them relax, tends to help take their mind off what’s going on, and so they use this as an unhelpful and unhealthy coping strategy.”Super League star: Jason Robinson playing for WiganJason Robinson knows how this goes. The World Cup winner has spoken often about his days of drinking while a young star for Wigan Warriors in league.Robinson says he masked his habit of going out up to four nights a week before playing, by performing so well. He wonders “how on earth did I do it?” when asked how he maintained such a level while drinking heavily. But he is sure of the reasons why he went out.He was under a huge amount of pressure to perform from a young age, with pressure to fit in, and then there was significant friction in his personal life. Without a good support base, he would say yes to a night out with all-comers so he could avoid his “pain”. When he woke up, the pain was back.The legendary stepper posits that in the future he would love to see an independent mental health professional being embedded into elite rugby clubs; someone who gets to know the team well enough that they can sense when something is off about any of them, but who does not answer to the club.The reason for this is the fear of contracts being ripped up. Robinson tells Rugby World this is a genuine motivator to swallow your problem and never tell anyone. Our anonymous medic talks of a reticence amongst players to discuss such issues because reputations can kill a career. When our medic talks of isolation, this is also borne out in everyday life. According to Dr Matthew Dunn, a senior lecturer on public health at Australia’s Deakin University, you are conditioned to feel apart and also that there are few shared experiences, even with addicts.“With the support group I’m involved with, it’s very shocking to the guys when they realise that they’re not the only ones,” he says. “They are not unique and almost every session we remind everyone: you’re not a snowflake, you’re as average as everyone around this table. It normalises it more, so that people who feel like they have a problem can seek assistance.”But Dunn also points out that with sportspeople we can fall into the trap of making heroes out of the few we hear speak out: “Not everyone is going to have that redemption-type story.”DRAGGED UP FRONTFITZSIMONS SAYS he has suffered the stigma of being ‘out’ as an alcoholic. He believes, despite the good that Alcoholics Anonymous can do for some, that the default of burying your drinking issue deep inside and staying anonymous will ultimately hold our society back.There’s more. He says: “I would like to see in my lifetime that we get to a point where we have more people – and not just like me – that are very passionate about promoting recovery. We will finally get to a point where any player can go, ‘I’m struggling with this guys, I’ve got an addiction and I need to get it sorted.’“I don’t think that’s in the next ten or 15 years. A few things I’d like to change before that happens. The anonymous thing has to drop and the clubs’ reaction will have to change as well.”Of course there are reasons almost no one wants to come out. There is a fear of being hounded in the media and also crushing your resale value – or contracts getting ripped up, as mentioned above.Too much, too fast: Former All Black Zac Guildford in 2011One man who knows how hard it is to deal with the public glare is Zac Guildford. Having become an All Black at 20, Guildford was admitting to issues with alcoholism just a few years later. He would take years came to terms with his father’s sudden death – he passed away in the stands at the Junior World Cup. At the same time he was thrust into an intense national spotlight. Until he was into his late 20s, his lifestyle overshadowed his playing career.“Our world is supposed to be full of rainbows and sunshine and we’re supposed to earn good money, but it’s not the reality at all,” Guildford says of hidden stresses. “I see it as especially hard for rugby players, because the stereotype is of us as somebody that’s not supposed to have problems. So there’s a stigma around it.”But how hard is it regaining ‘trust’ when you’ve had such public issues?“It’s been really hard. After losing my Waratahs contract in 2016, I went back and I played rugby for free for about a year. I was actually working on my grandparents’ farm, then took up a job in Hamilton so I could play some sevens, which led to me getting a semi-professional contract.“I thought that something would then pop up soon after in terms of Super Rugby, but no one out there wanted to trust me again. So I went back to where I was a year before and I played sevens again and then was lucky that the owner of Nevers (in France’s ProD2) had a bit of faith in me and he gave me an option if I wanted to go and join the club. It was the only option on the table so I took it.”Guildford’s determination to salvage a respectable career in the game is to be admired. However, as the top end of the sport turns away from him, the back-three player feels he should give a warning. He acknowledges that treatment of mental health issues has come a long way in the game, but he feels there is still more to do.A few, he says, still play lip service to the idea. He would like to see more done within clubs in terms of professional development and “tapping into the brain”.If anything else, it may help some pros when the game is finally over.Springboks veteran: Stefan Terblanche when with UlsterWHEN THE LIGHTS GO OUTDUE TO the stigma and the risk to future earnings, finding current players to offer up their personal (anonymous) experiences is understandably tough. Nevertheless, several people contacted considered ex-players an at-risk group.“There are many players who have to deal with social issues after rugby,” says 37-cap former Springboks wing Stefan Terblanche. He represents South Africa Rugby Legends, a non-profit group of ex-Boks who band together for events but also, it transpires, to keep an eye on each other’s wellbeing after retirement.“We did a study in 2015,” Terblanche continues. “We did a questionnaire and it was anonymous, but we found that (retired professional rugby players) do struggle with anxiety, sleeplessness, alcohol abuse and eating disorders – much more than the average person of the same age.“There is certainly a correlation there between retirement and these social issues that ex-players have to deal with. We see it more and more in South Africa because there’s financial strain on you. You earn £10,000 a month, for instance, and the next month all of a sudden you have to find a way of making some money. If you make some bad decisions it puts you under pressure and before you know it the little bit of money you had put away during your career can easily dry up.”Terblanche says only a few members have sought help, but he is certain there are others out there. The problem is that these are hard, proud men. And while money is held up as a regular sore spot for ex-players, it can be more existential.At Rugby Players Ireland (RPI), Dr Ella McCabe is player development manager. On the causes for concern with former players, she says: “I think one major piece we’ve noted is that when people’s entire identity is focused around being a rugby player, when that part of their life finishes up, it can feel like there’s a big void. It’s a risky time in terms of what will fill that void and all the coping strategies can kick in at that point.“Our whole programme is about players developing their identity off the pitch right the way through their career. It’s the same around the sense of belonging because exiting the game can be quite a lonely experience.”While Dunn notes the fact that not all open alcoholics get happy endings, and Fitzsimons acknowledges that many of us are conditioned to internalise anxieties, both understand the power of shared stories. It can even be more powerful to hear from those who blew their chance to play at the top level.Forging ahead: Peter Mirrielees of Otago runs with the ballMany would take notice when Peter Mirrielees says: “My drinking left a path of destruction and with a competitive streak being added with alcohol, things weren’t going to work out.”Having resolved to change his life three years ago, the former Otago hooker, 35, feels he has taken command of his mindset. And the reason behind that? He felt like the lifestyle he had cultivated for himself would ultimately lead to his family choosing to abandon him.Mirrielees opens up: “Firstly, I put myself into drug, alcohol and addiction counselling where I found the source of what made me drink the way I did. Then I went from around 200 friends to about ten and I had to change my surroundings, with everything focused on keeping my family together.“I lost my chance of a full-time Highlanders contract because of my drinking. But once I got rid of emotional stressors I did not need to get wasted.”Now running a 24-hour gym with his wife, the father of three has offered confidential lifestyle advice to players, friends and clients. But having recognised there were deeper issues he had previously ignored, he knowsit is the emotional torment that some try to drown out with booze.He asks straight out if you would stand by as a mate leant heavily on the bottle, saying: “Are they trying to deal with something? Are we a good enough friend to sit someone down and say, ‘Hey, what’s going on?’ before they go down their own road of destruction?”HELP AT HANDACCORDING TO Dr Hopley, the mere fact someone has got in touch through the confidential hotline is a red flag.Most often, people seek professional help because those around them – partners or relatives – are negatively impacted by the drinker’s lifestyle and cannot take it any more. Sometimes, rarely, help is sought because someone has crossed the line, legally.Talking through the process when you call Cognacity, Hopley says that when you pick up the phone and call the number, it is answered by a trained telephone counsellor who’s used to dealing with crisis situations. Once they have a brief summary of the situation, they patch that through to whoever is on-call at that time – for example, a consultant psychiatrist like Hopley.That person would call the in-need individual back and talk for up to an hour to determine the acuteness of the situation while also taking in relevant background information on the caller’s lifestyle, what support they’ve got and what big challenges are coming up.Power of charity: Restart Rugby fund RPA initiativesNext could be a form of intervention, which is usually psychological therapy, with a psychologist or a cognitive behavioural therapist. The aim is to help that person understand their problems and identify triggers. Ultimately, the aim is to modify drinking habits.A whole host of player associations – MyPlayers South Africa, RUPA, RPI, the Welsh Rugby Players’ Association and New Zealand Rugby Players’ Association – have Player Development Managers in place. Most of these have access to confidential counselling. On the Islands, Pacific Rugby Players push education programmes whilst hustling to set up better services for members in France.Meanwhile, Dr McCabe and RPI have worked with International Rugby Players and World Rugby to develop a mental health module for team doctors that will provide basic education on what mental health means, common signs, symptoms (including of alcohol use disorders), screening and referral pathways.Having made alcohol a big focus in the past season, and staged seminars on problem gambling the year before, the RPA intend to have a broader focus on addictive behaviours next season. But they are keen to point out that their funding for any future services comes from the Restart charity.Hopley is pleased that the RPA’s recent ‘Lift the Weight’ campaign generated an increase in players calling their line for help. More referrals have come from club doctors too. But he also reiterates that the viability of any add-on services comes down to money.Every players’ body mentioned above would love to provide even better resources. And even then, not all major nations have a truly independent body.In March, the Scottish Rugby Union launched their ‘Rugby for Life’ scheme. Following a mandate from the board to do more for players’ mental wellbeing, their HR department utilised “advice and expertise from a cross-section of mental health charities, professional organisations and academic experts” in order to “better understand the impact of mental health issues and learn from examples of best practice”.As commendable as this is, many in the North feel something is missing without the players having their own body, separate from the union.“I’m aware of a few serious incidents within Scottish rugby,” one former pro player, who is still heavily involved in the game, tells Rugby World. “There needs to be an independent Scottish Players’ Association – an RPA-style organisation. Especially for those in professional or semi-professional rugby, like the upcoming Super 6. There isn’t anything like the excellent RPA here in Scotland.“Outside of rugby, life happens – deaths, divorces, children, sickness, relationships. What needs to change is the attitude from the SRU that an SPA organisation is a bad idea that wrests control from them. Such an organisation would give longevity to more players and they would be in a better mental and physical state to give their all for their club and their country.”CONCLUSIONTHINGS ARE moving fast in the mental health sphere in rugby union. Hard work already being done must be applauded while current or future initiatives must be given the oxygen they need to succeed. An in-depth look at how serious issues with alcohol can become a nightmarish secret in the lives of some elite rugby players. This first appeared in the August issue of the magazinecenter_img But the urge to pretend everyone who needs help is getting it must be resisted. Depression, anxiety, fear, addiction… these cannot be grounds for a shredded contract or a trade made in bad faith while a player is still in need of help. And players: there is help out there.Professional players in England can reach Cognacity at 01373 858080.Mental health charity Mind’s infoline is on 0300 123 3393.If you feel you or someone you know may need help, your GP can recommend local services. You can also find a range of services at www.drinkaware.co.uk/alcohol-support-services TAGS: Investigation last_img read more

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Archbishop calls for Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission in Zimbabwe

Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] The Archbishop of York, John Sentamu, has called for the new government in Zimbabwe to deal with past injustices. Speaking on the BBC’s “The Andrew Marr Show” Nov. 26, the second-most senior cleric in the Church of England suggested that the country should follow South Africa’s example and establish a Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission. Ten years ago, Sentamu cut up his clerical collar on the program, saying he would not wear one again until Robert Mugabe had left power. Yesterday, he put a new collar on for the first time in a decade.Read the entire article here. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Featured Events Africa, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Posted Nov 27, 2017 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Archbishop calls for Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission in Zimbabwe Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing read more

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Florida Hospital announces its Hurricane Irma scheduling

first_imgFrom Florida Hospital Apopka LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 The safety of our patients, visitors and employees is of the utmost importance. Updates about hospital and out-patient facility operations will be updated as needed.Statewide:· Centra Care locations will be closed Sunday and Monday.· Patients can access urgent-care services on their phone or tablet through Florida Hospital’s eCare app from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. until the storm subsides. This service, which is for minor injuries and conditions such as allergies, infections, cold and flu, will be offered free of charge through Tuesday, Sept. 12. The Florida Hospital eCare app can be downloaded from Google Play or the App Store on iTunes.Orange, Osceola, Lake and Seminole counties:· Preparations have been under way at our hospitals for the last several days to secure the buildings and ensure that all our patients and staff will be safe and comfortable during the storm. Arrangements have been made for full staffing of physicians and nurses throughout the duration of the storm. Generators are on hand, and water, food, linens and other supplies have been stockpiled to last through the storm.· Elective and non-emergent procedures have been cancelled from Saturday through Monday.· Patients whom physicians deem ready for discharge will be discharged before the storm arrives. Of course, many of our patients will remain here under medical care during the storm. While we understand the desire for families to remain with their loved ones during this time, we strongly encourage visitors to consider the advice of emergency officials to stay off the roads and remain at home until the storm passes.· As a reminder to the public, hospitals are not designated storm shelters. Hospital facilities, including parking garages, are not open to the public, and are reserved for the use of patients and employees only. Hurricane You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 center_img Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your name here TAGSFlorida Hospital – ApopkaHurricane Irma Previous articleFDOT, FHP implements limited emergency shoulder use on I-75Next articleApopka Police Department Arrest Report Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Centra Care locations closed Sunday and Monday. Please enter your comment!last_img read more

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Baan 33 Apartment / Stu/D/O Architects

first_imgPhotographs:  DOF Sky|Ground Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Area:  1200 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  Baan 33 Apartment / Stu/D/O ArchitectsSave this projectSaveBaan 33 Apartment / Stu/D/O Architects ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/927228/baan-33-apartment-stu-d-o-architects Clipboard CopyApartments•Khet Watthana, Thailand 2019 Manufacturers: AutoDesk, MAG, TGSG, TOA, TrimbleDesign Team:Apichart Srirojanapinyo, Chanasit Cholasuek, Picsacha Na Songkhla, Tirayu PreechavibulStructural Engineer:Ittipon KonjaisueMechanical Engineer:MEE ConsultantsConsultants:Chanin LimapornvanichCity:Khet WatthanaCountry:ThailandMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© DOF Sky|GroundRecommended ProductsWoodBruagBalcony BalustradesDoorsdormakabaEntrance Doors – Revolving Door 4000 SeriesMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedDoorsVEKADoors – VEKAMOTION 82Text description provided by the architects. Baan 33 Apartment began as an architectural design experiment of the spatial relationship between a mix-use programmatic requirement of a six-bedroom private residence and four service apartment units. Due to the surrounding urban context and the requirement provided by the owner, the overall architectural zoning are strategically organized to provide all occupants with the highest amount of privacy, while still have a close connection to the natural environment. Save this picture!© DOF Sky|GroundThe private residence is positioned on the ground floor where it can be closely connected to nature.  From the second floor onto the fifth, the private residence is positioned facing the front of the site, taking in view of the surrounding context, while the service apartment is positioned towards the rear, each unit separated by floors. Save this picture!© DOF Sky|GroundIn order to maximizes privacy for both the home owner and the apartment tenants, two separate circulations route were created exclusively for each functions. The apartment’s circulation core and service area are positioned in the east and south, where it is enclosed by the neighboring high rises.  The vertical circulation for the private residence is deliberately positioned between the two function, as it separates and provide privacy for both the residents and tenants. In conjunction with the concept in programmatic organization and zoning, the architectural concept of Baan 33 Apartment is to create a connection between the residents and nature through the subtraction of mass, as it provide natural ventilation and daylighting for the spaces. Save this picture!© DOF Sky|GroundSave this picture!Second floor planSave this picture!© DOF Sky|GroundWhile its diverse application generate differing spatial outcomes, this architectural language of mass subtraction results in an overall cohesive architectural form.  The mass which houses the service apartment is deducted in smaller blocks while still keeping the building envelope intact as it protects the building from the solar heat gain generated by the intense western sun.  Furthermore, a vertical void stretching from the interior space to the exterior roofline, is subtracted from the mass, allowing for cross ventilation, through the buoyancy effect, to naturally cool the whole building. Save this picture!© DOF Sky|GroundFor the private residence, the southern mass is completely removed providing the residence with the best possible view.  The void is then replaced by transitional spaces functioning as both an exterior terrace and a shading device for the interior space.  Where in the service apartment, the building envelope is kept as solid walls, the private residence is utilizes expanded aluminum cladding as its envelope.  This material strategy in able to simultaneously provide shading, ventilation, and view for the occupants. Additionally, as a respond to the limited space of the site, a common area is placed on the rooftop, accessible by both the residents of the house and the tenants of the apartment to use for activities and relaxation.Save this picture!© DOF Sky|GroundProject gallerySee allShow lessZhuyeqing Greentea Flagship Store / X+LIVINGSelected ProjectsM House / BAUMSelected ProjectsProject locationAddress:27 Sukhumvit Rd, Khwaeng Phra Khanong Nuea, Khet Watthana, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon 10110, ThailandLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Apartments Projects Thailandcenter_img Save this picture!© DOF Sky|Ground+ 33Curated by María Francisca González Share “COPY” Architects: Stu/D/O Architects Area Area of this architecture project CopyAbout this officeStu/D/O ArchitectsOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsKhet WatthanaOn FacebookThailandPublished on October 29, 2019Cite: “Baan 33 Apartment / Stu/D/O Architects” 29 Oct 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemWindowsMitrexSolar WindowMetal PanelsAurubisPatinated Copper: Nordic Green/Blue/Turquoise/SpecialMetal PanelsDri-DesignMetal Panels – CopperIn architectureSikaBuilding Envelope SystemsExterior DeckingLunawoodThermowood DeckingMembranesEffisusFaçade Protection – Breather+Metal PanelsPure + FreeFormCustom Metal Cladding – Legacy Fund 1 BuildingWood Boards / HPL PanelsInvestwoodWood Fiber Partition Walls – ValchromatDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile FILO 10 Vertical Pivot Door | BrezzaSkylightsFAKROEnergy-efficient roof window FTT ThermoToilets / BidetsBritexToilets – Accessible Centurion PanMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?Baan 33 住宅公寓综合体 / Stu/D/O Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/927228/baan-33-apartment-stu-d-o-architects Clipboard Photographs Baan 33 Apartment / Stu/D/O Architects “COPY”last_img read more

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Disqualified from driving after found asleep in car

first_img Previous articleNew material from The WallsNext article‘MILES’ charity rebrands as ‘FAMILIES’ to reflect demand admin Linkedin Facebook Email WhatsApp Advertisementcenter_img Twitter A UNIVERSITY of Limerick student found asleep in his “badly parked” car by gardai, has been banned from driving after a breath sample registered over twice the legal limit at the time.Patrick O’Connell, aged 24, originally from county Leitrim, but with an address at Briarfield, Castletroy, was found asleep in his car a short distance from the Kilmurry Lodge hotel and his home at 1.50am on October 13, 2010.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Evidence was given that the accused was in the driver’s seat with his seat belt and ignition on.The car was in a stationary position, “blocking one lane of traffic,” and “obscurely parked” according to the State’s evidence.He was roused by gardai.O’Connell, it was stated, responded with slurred speech, had bloodshot eyes and was deemed incapable of being in charge of a vehicle. He had to be held up and was unsteady on his feet,He was arrested under the suspicion of drink driving, and conveyed to Henry Street garda station where he provided a breath sample that registered 86/100.O’Connell was formerly charged with the offence in the early hours of the morning and released on his own bail bond.Chris Lynch, solicitor, contested the case as his client had a different account of events.He put it to the garda that his client was sitting in the car and was not driving, nor had he been driving late that night.The State admitted, under cross examination, that the garda statement did not say that the engine was running, despite them giving such evidence from the witness box during the case.Mr Lynch challenged this aspect and queried if gardai did any of the normal routine checks like assessing if the engine was warm or if the car had been driven.The court heard that there was no evidence of these checks being carried out, or that the engine was running at the time gardai arrived.It was said that O’Connell was out with friends on the night and had parked near the Kilmurry Lodge Hotel, in an area adjacent to a graveyard.O’Connell said that he knew of cars to be regularly parked there and did so on the night in question, because he was told that cars had been damaged in the hotel car park before.It was contested that O’Connell, who had been lodging at a house in Briarfield, felt ill on walking home after a night of drinking with friends and sat into his car earlier that night.He said that he felt sick and put the window down and then fell asleep.O’Connell, in his direct evidence, said that he had no intention of driving home as his house was only minutes away.He “just sat in there to gather his senses,” as he felt so unwell after “over indulging”.Under cross examination, Mr O’Connell admitted that he was a driver of eight years and he drove to the bar despite living only minutes away, but denied that his car was blocking the road.He said he sat into the car as he didn’t want to be a “nuisance on the road”.He added: “I was sick, I sat in and passed out, and I had no intention of driving home”.Mr Lynch closed his evidence and said that his client was emigrating within the month.However, Judge Eamon O’Brien was satisfied with the evidence of the State and convicted the student, disqualifying him from driving for a period of three years. He also fined him €50, ordering that it be paid within three months or if found to be in default, serve seven days in prison.Recognisance to appeal the conviction was set at €100. Print NewsLocal NewsDisqualified from driving after found asleep in carBy admin – March 29, 2012 540 last_img read more

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UK VAT rise will attract more shoppers to Donegal

first_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Google+ Facebook Facebook Google+ 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North News By News Highland – June 22, 2010 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Previous articleDerry gorse fire started deliberatleyNext articleInquest hears details of kite surfer’s death News Highland UK VAT rise will attract more shoppers to Donegalcenter_img Pinterest WhatsApp Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Crossing the border to do your shopping may not prove as economical from the start of next year.The UK VAT rate is being hiked.The new Chancellor George Osborne made the announcement as part of his first Budget.From next January, it’ll be 20 per cent – from the current 17 and a half.He says raising VAT was unavoidable:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/14osbo1.mp3[/podcast]Meanwhile, the President of the Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce has welcomed todays UK budget.Paul Byrne, says with the rise in VAT to 20%, then Northern shoppers may come back to Donegal for value for money.[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/paul530.mp3[/podcast] Twitter Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Pinterest Twitterlast_img read more

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FL woman reunites with 911 dispatcher after nearly drowning in muddy ditch

first_imgAmanda Antonio, left, and 911 dispatcher Cheyanne Allen, right. (ABC News)(TAMPA, Fla.) — A Florida woman had a tearful reunion with one of the rescuers who saved her from drowning this week when she lost control of her vehicle and landed upside down in a muddy ditch.Amanda Antonio, 33, said she felt as if she’d met an “angel” on Thursday when she came face-to-face with Cheyanne Allen, the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office operator who answered her desperate call on New Year’s Day when she veered off a Tampa highway and found herself trapped in a ditch full of muddy water.“I’m just glad that she was there to answer the phone because she really kept me calm,” Antonio told ABC News’ Good Morning America in an interview on Thursday. “I was panicking at first, but hearing her voice — she was so calm throughout the whole thing — it just kept me calm.”“She was the first angel I met that night. She brought everyone else to me,” she added.Antonio was nearly encased in mud when they finally located her at around 4 a.m. Tuesday morning, according to the sheriff’s office.“The water was rising and there was real fear of her drowning,” the office said in a statement after the rescue. “Our communications team did an incredible job of keeping her calm while 13 patrol units looked for her in the thick fog that was blanketing the area making it difficult to find her.”When asked about the rescue on GMA Thursday, Allen said Antonio’s survival is proof that “people were definitely watching over us.”“I just wanted to stay on as long as I could to keep her calm because, honestly, I didn’t know what the outcome was going to be,” Allen said. “I was really nervous when she was talking on the phone with me and I was scared for her.“I’ve never gotten to meet anyone that I’ve been on the phone with and for this to be such a crazy story, I’m glad I just got to hug her and know she’s OK,” she added.Antonio found it hard to describe the joy she felt when paramedics finally located her. She thought she had about 30 seconds left before she would have been completely submerged.“I’m just grateful that they were able to help me and pull me out,” Antonio said. “They were like you’re so lucky. … The only reason why we saw you is because the helicopter spotted the bumper of the car.”She added, “In a way they seemed like they were in shock, like, ‘She’s alive!’ They seemed happy. This was definitely a miracle.”She said she’s looking forward to meeting the other officers who helped her soon, but she wanted to make sure that Allen got the recognition she deserved.“Not many people really recognize the hard work you have to put in, rather than just the police officers and everyone else,” she said, looking toward Allen. “They do hard work too, but you’re one of the first people that pick up and I’m grateful.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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