A dark chapter of Apopka history quietly ends (hopefully)

first_img Mama Mia Are you kidding Mama Mia? He left the scene of an accident he was involved in. He was a licensed paramedic and offered no help to an injured party. Instead, he made calls to protect himself and fled the scene. Yes, we can sit in judgment of his actions. While the accident wasn’t intentional, his decision to leave the scene of the accident was. I agree with Gene on this. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Reply Reply Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Mamma Mia you must be a democrat, I stand with Mr. Knight, where do I plop down my money to fight that S.O.B. Wayne Yes, I am a Democrat, and a proud Democrat, who along with my party have plans to make America, America again, and take back our country from that rogue, outlaw/liar, crook/con-man who is ruining our country. Funny, that you would bring up partisanship into an issue totally unrelated to this article, oh well…….if you feel so strongly about defending the city against lawsuits, you could always start a go-fund me for the COA’s legal defense fund, if you are serious, but I think throwing your cash into a collective pot to fight against Mr. Anderson would be fruitless, as the city council’s majority vote cast settled that case. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Reply Cindy Mama Mia May 7, 2019 at 11:49 am Average Joe Reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. 13 COMMENTS Mariah McCullough May 6, 2019 at 5:36 pm As well as I remember, when this accident happened and the city learned of it, they wouldn’t let Richard honor and fulfill his contract. That is why he didn’t fulfill his contract, plus the city sued him. Anyone can sit back and judge, but the accident was not intentional, nor caused by malice. We may never know what caused the accident with certainty, but I, for one, am thankful that neither man was killed. Cindy….. As I stated before, anyone can sit back and judge. I wasn’t at the accident scene, as the “fly on the wall”, and I don’t know all the facts about the case, and the circumstances, so I won’t judge Richard’s actions, sorry to disappoint you all. I am not certain, if it were me in a horrible head-on crash like that, going over 50 miles an hour, (I’m guessing) that I could make great on- the- spot decisions, after crawling out of the wreckage…. also, I am not clear on Florida’s laws regarding liabilities and duty to rescue, as the laws vary from to state, and are about as clear as mud to me, but I do believe a rescuer, even a paramedic, can be sued for rendering help, and I believe, there are other liabilities, if not acting in that official capacity from an employer. I believe, but am not sure, his employment with the city as a lobbyist was a contractual one, not as a standard employee, so to call him a coward, seems very judgmental, without considering other circumstances involved in being a paramedic, and for him just in a head-on crash. For a long time, I didn’t even know the difference in an EMT and a paramedic, so why in the world, my opinion of his not rendering aid, is of soooo much importance to you all, is beyond belief to me. I have posted in the past, here on the Apopka Voice, of a case of a registered nurse, that was a vendor at a local flea market around here, that when called upon for help to render aid to an older lady that fell out, and was having a heart attack, lying on the gravel road, on her back….. she refused to render aid, and it took the first responders so long to get there, to the scene, and later, I learned the lady died. Did I think it was right?….No, I didn’t, I was really shocked that a registered nurse wouldn’t help the lady, but people have there reasons, and I don’t think there is a law that says they have to render aid…..oath, or not. IMO, a lot of Apopka citizens are mad more about Richard’s high salary, as a former city administrator, and then his high salary as a lobbyist/special project manager, offered to him by Mayor K, and I believe they are transferring their anger about that, and the ongoing politics of this politically divided city, into anger about the settlement money, and about Lake County prosecutors not taking the case to trial against Richard. Ok? So now what do you all want to argue about? Mama Mia, I noticed you never address those points made by Mariah McCullough and Wayne. So leaving the scene of an accident with great bodily injury is no big deal to you? Not to mention he had the skill set to help and CHOSE not to…..sounds like a real stand-up guy to me! Angry Veteran Mama Mia Mama Mia Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Jim c Average Joe, I have no idea what in the world you are posting about regarding Richard selling property back to the city for big profits……and conflict of interest? I am at a lost to what you mean. It is my understanding that properties bought or sold, in the city’s interest, have to be voted on and confirmed via city council vote. I don’t remember anything tied to Richard’s name, regarding generator purchases during the hurricane seasons of the past, I think you got the wrong guy. It is my understanding Richard is the one who helped to get Taurus to invest into the city center development, so he must of done something “lobbying” and the city council approved it. As Mayor Land grew older, and his health suffered somewhat, he was far from a “detached” mayor, and he leaned on Richard more and more, and depended on him. Richard didn’t take advantage of Mayor Land, because Mayor Land thought highly of Richard, and trusted him totally. I doubt Richard is laughing all the way to the bank, as you assume, IMO, he is probably relieved, and thankful for surviving this traumatic life event and all the aftermath that followed. Mama Mia is Wrong Again! (waterboy movie reference)Richard sucked all the money he could out of Apopka. Selling property back to the city for big profits…conflict of interest…you think? Buying post-hurricane generators for him and his cronies using city funds. Highly paid lobbyist who never lobbied a thing for the city. When asked in a council meeting why he hasn’t done a thing he replies, well you never asked. The nerve of this guy.While Mayor Land was in his last couple terms, Richard saw dollar signs and took full advantage of a detached mayor. Now he’s sitting on a pile of cash, two city pensions and a $60,000 payday. I can hear him laughing all the way to the bank.I would not at all be surprised if he’s still pulling some strings at the city administration office. Gene Knight Anderson is part of the old mayor’s boys. I do think Mayor land did great things for the city. But was in office way to long. Anderson took an oath as a Firefighter to protect and help. Leaving an injured person and running like a coward is a disgrace. As a retired 30yr Firefighter his behavior is unacceptable.center_img To me it’s about doing the right thing on this issue. First of all Anderson almost killed a person and left the scene of an accident. Second he never fulfilled his contract with the city, if we continue to let people get away with stuff like this, we’re no better than them. This was a case the city could have won. I would have been proud to use my tax dollars to fight Anderson so other people that try to take advantage of our city knows we will prosecute. May 7, 2019 at 11:11 am May 8, 2019 at 11:49 am Reply May 6, 2019 at 3:35 pm The Anatomy of Fear Reply Just glad it is over , stop slandering the dead, mayor Land was a great Man and leader, let it go. We now have another good man who loves this city, as Mayor, let him and the City council do their jobs, May 6, 2019 at 11:23 pm May 8, 2019 at 10:12 am May 6, 2019 at 12:07 pm Mariah, no, there is nothing I am kidding about in my comments about the above article. TAGSApopka City CouncilOpinionRichard Anderson Previous articleOrange County Government Focuses on Training during “Building Safety Month”Next articleWas the Legislative session good for Apopka? Let’s Talk About It Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply Mama Mia May 9, 2019 at 11:40 am Reply Please enter your name here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Cindy May 7, 2019 at 11:27 am Reply May 6, 2019 at 5:34 pm Reply Mama Mia, when you have the opportunity to help someone in need, I think it’s a question of morality – not legality. I realize that one can sit back and think of their own self interest first and choose not to render aid – legally. But, as a spiritual person, I believe it is in those moments in life that someone’s true character is revealed. Reply Please enter your comment! OpinionBy Reggie Connell/Managing Editor of The Apopka VoiceAt the tail end of the Apopka City Council meeting last week, City Attorney Joseph K. Byrd presented a last-minute offer by former Apopka Chief Administrator Richard Anderson to settle a lawsuit for $60,000. The Council voted 3-2 to accept the settlement, which reversed a decision they made in 2017 to refuse that same amount.And thus ended one of the darkest chapters in Apopka history – hopefully.It’s been a little over three years since Anderson’s Dodge Ram crossed the center line on SR46 in Lake County and crashed head-on into Michael Falcon’s Toyota, severely injuring Falcon, and taking the city and community of Apopka down a very dark path in the process.But that path may have ended in the Council Chambers on Wednesday with an unexpected windfall for Anderson.After being arrested and charged with Leaving the Scene with Serious Bodily Injury, Reckless Driving with Serious Bodily Injury, Tampering with Physical Evidence, Leaving the Scene with Property Damage, and Reckless Driving with Property Damage, Anderson avoided a prison sentence when Lake County prosecutors were unable to prove he was behind the wheel of the vehicle he owned that crashed into Falcon, who suffered a concussion, punctured lung, fractured sternum, three herniated discs, a broken hand, and broken wrists. Despite being seen by multiple witnesses at the scene of the crash making phone calls, the prosecutors chose not to take the case to trial.Anderson pled no contest to leaving the scene of an accident with serious bodily injury and was sentenced to probation. He may also avoid a felony record because the judge withheld adjudication.The City of Apopka sued Anderson for $166,000, alleging he breached a personal-services contract with the city by failing to advise city officials of the collision, thus putting the city into a bad light, and for failing to fulfill his contract. Anderson counter-sued, and three years later, is poised to claim victory in his suit against the City.In 2017, the City Council voted against a settlement in which it would pay Anderson $60,000 and drop its claim. But at the City Council meeting on Wednesday, it reversed its decision – voting 3-2 in favor of ending the lawsuit under the same terms as 2017.The split decision mirrored the mixed opinions of the City Council, as well as Cliff Shepard.“This settlement would bring to an end what has been a long chapter in the city’s history,” said Shepard, the former Apopka City Attorney who is still lead counsel on this lawsuit. “But as you all know, or at least some of you who were here before, there were reasons previously the Council was not amenable to the settlement. Those reasons may have changed because of time, or wanting to put things behind them… so I don’t judge the offer except to say it is the same offer as 2017 based on the mediation. In terms of downside, there are none except we don’t get money back, and we have to pay out money. In terms of what could happen if we go to trial – it’s a good case for us, but also one in which if we win, there’s no guarantee we would ever collect from Mr. Anderson. Those are the same facts that were true in 2017 as well.”Commissioners Alice Nolan and Alexander H. Smith, neither of whom were on the Council in 2017, voted in favor of the settlement. Smith, who made the successful motion to accept the settlement, had no comment about the lawsuit during the discussion. Nolan, however, had plenty of thoughts.“Personally I’d like to stop the bleeding on this,” she said. “This has drawn out for a very long time, but I’m willing to hear what the rest of the Council has to say.”Commissioner Doug Bankson, who voted to accept the mediated settlement in 2017, was also for accepting of it this time.“I think we spent $70,000 on this case, and then if we settle it will be another chunk. But it will be less than if we go forward… unless we win. The problem is we probably won’t see a cent of that even if we do win. I guess for me I really want to get away from the personal politics of this thing and just do what’s best for the people of this city and be able to move forward. I’m ready to go forward as a City.”Commissioner Kyle Becker voted against the settlement in 2017 on the basis of principle, and those principles did not change two years later.“I don’t know Mr. Anderson. I may have shaken his hand or said hello to him but not to a degree where I can talk about his personal character. I’m not intending to do that here. But to me, there’s a strong ability to state the merits of our case… and it’s hard for me to get behind any sort of settlement when I know people say it’s $70,000 vs. $60,000, but when you look at it from those terms, we’re paying $60,000 for work that wasn’t done versus work that will be done in a legal standpoint to protect our city.”In 2017, Becker had a similar response to the settlement offer by Anderson.“My litmus test, the first thing I’m asking myself is right versus wrong. For that reason, I’m willing to risk dollars if it means we’re doing the right thing to protect the integrity of the people of this town who entrust people like Mr. Anderson. That’s where my stance is and I really don’t think I’m budging on this one.”Mayor Bryan Nelson had a novel response to the settlement; basically recusing himself because the offer did not make it onto the agenda by Friday. Nelson voted no on that basis but encouraged the Council to vote in favor of the offer.“I pride myself on transparency. If I had this on Friday I’d feel really comfortable voting for it, but I can’t. If we could put this off two weeks I’d be more than comfortable doing it, but I’m saying if you want to vote for it, I’m perfectly fine with that. It’s not about the dollars, it’s a process for me. I know our attorney doesn’t like the reason I’m standing down on this, but it’s not about the amount. It’s not about Richard Anderson. It’s about the process for me, but if you out vote me that would be great.”Before the final vote, Becker asked about a clause that would not allow Anderson to work for the City of Apopka. Shepard said that clause was removed from this offer and that a non-disparagement clause was added. The Council chose to put the non-employment clause back into the settlement, which makes their vote a counter offer that Anderson could reject.“Our citizens are asking for recreational stuff. They’re asking for more things with AFD and APD (Apopka Fire and Police Departments),” Nolan added. “I just feel like that money could be used over there rather than who was right or who was wrong. It’s obvious who was right and who was wrong. The public knows and we know.”Bankson was also concerned that rushing the process might be perceived incorrectly by Apopka residents, but felt closing the book on this case took priority.“I think it’s important that we are perceived correctly. What makes me uncomfortable is that we haven’t had the chance before the public to show that this is something based on the merits and the judgment of what seems to be the best way to go forward for the people. It’s based upon the merits that I’m ready to vote.”Despite a diversity of opinions, it’s hard to disagree with any of the wisdom verbalized by the City Council. Who wouldn’t want to end the ugliness? Who wouldn’t want to pay the small settlement and not risk losing additional attorney fees so that the City can increase fire, police, and recreational budgets?But at the end of the day, the City of Apopka paid a person $60,000 who left the scene of a nearly fatal crash, and despite making multiple phone calls shortly after the incident, did not inform his employer. Apopka paid a person who took money to do a job as a consultant and lobbyist but didn’t take the time to register as one.It was hard to make that case in 2017. It’s hard to make that case based on a rushed settlement offer the day of the City Council meeting. And it would be hard to make that case if the Council had followed Nelson’s lead and deferred it until it could officially make the agenda at the following City Council meeting on May 15th – especially when your attorney still believes you have a good chance at success.As Becker said ‘there is a litmus test of right versus wrong’. As Nolan said ‘we know who was right and who was wrong’.Sometimes it’s just that simple. You fight for what is right. You fight for the Michael Falcons of the world. You fight for the city workers who do a job and get their wage – most likely under $60,000. You fight even though you are using taxpayer money to do so. Perhaps you fight BECAUSE you are using taxpayer money to do so.A victorious lawsuit would not repair the damage done, and it would not dramatically affect the next budget win or lose, but at least it would put the City on the right side of the issue. May 7, 2019 at 11:43 am Reply May 10, 2019 at 11:16 amlast_img read more

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Mount Rushmore defense of genocide

first_imgJust when we thought things couldn’t get worse. The July Fourth speech, delivered at the foot of Mount Rushmore by the bigot-in-chief, reminds us that under the capitalist system, things can always get worse. Especially when the occupant of the White House seems to have zero boundaries when it comes to outlandishly offensive and medically dangerous comments, positions and actions.As a civilian boss in the private sector, Trump would probably be even more candid. One can picture him carrying the signs, spotted since his election, that read, “I’m a racist and proud of it.” It’s not hard to picture him carrying a Confederate flag, sporting a swastika or openly proclaiming fascist pride once he leaves public office (the sooner the better!).As U.S. president, he has to cloak his message in rhetoric upholding “democracy.”The freedom fighters rebelling in the streets are tearing down — and pushing the state to tear down — monuments to slaveowners and slaughterers of Indigenous people. To punish them for their heroic actions, Trump bragged that he would impose a 10-year prison sentence. To Trump and his cheering minions, the righteous rebellion in the streets represents “the very definition of totalitarianism.” The president even went so far as to call it “a new far-left fascism that demands absolute allegiance.” This turns reality on its head. White supremacist goons and cops have injured many protesters, some fatally. Yet it’s anti-racist activists arrested since the lynching of George Floyd who have been charged with felonies, with some facing decades or even life in prison. What is Mount Rushmore?South Dakota was annexed by the United States in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. The U.S. government then allowed settlements there, breaking earlier treaties made with the Indigenous Lakota Nation. U.S. Lt. Col. George Custer invaded the Black Hills in 1874, violating the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty that had left the unceded Black Hills with the Lakota, for whom the Hills are sacred. After Custer discovered gold, fortune-seeking white miners invaded the Hills. In 1889, North Dakota and South Dakota became the 39th and 40th states. Like all 50 states, from Alaska and Hawaii to New England, South Dakota is land stolen from the Indigenous population.Tȟuŋkášila Šákpe (“The Six Grandfathers”) or Igmútȟaŋka Pahá (“Cougar Mountain”) to the Lakota, the mountain was renamed after Charles Rushmore, a wealthy businessman who frequented the area on hunting and prospecting trips in the 1890s. The massive desecration began in 1927 with removal of huge amounts of granite to create the familiar busts of the four U.S. presidents. This work took 17 years and cost almost $1 million — a hefty sum of tax dollars in 1944.The sculptor, Gutzon Borglum, was a KKK member, who previously helped construct the massive Confederate monument on Stone Mountain, Ga. Borglum’s son Lincoln, who completed Rushmore after his father’s death, envisioned more desecration by setting in stone the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Louisiana purchase and the Panama Canal Treaty.Whose heads desecrate the Black Hills?The presidents depicted — George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abe Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt — represent various stages in the development of the U.S. imperialist empire. The two so-called “founding fathers” were wealthy slaveowners with vast tracts of land. Lincoln, portrayed as the benevolent leader who singlehandedly ended slavery, essentially freed the slaveholding states for capitalist expansion. Roosevelt, according to Trump’s version of history, “led the famous Rough Riders to defeat the enemy at San Juan Hill.” This imperialist stage of capitalist development does coincide with the U.S. seizure of Spanish-held colonies in 1898; Puerto Rico remains an impoverished U.S. colony. But San Juan Hill is in liberated territory — socialist Cuba — something a thousand Mount Rushmores can never erase.Trump’s gushing nostalgia over the falling monuments is reminiscent of Alabama Gov. George Wallace declaring in 1963: “Segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever.” We don’t know how long the gigantic, lucrative tourist trap will continue untarnished — hopefully not much longer. Courageous Indigenous treaty defenders were able to hold up Trump’s fascist hate rally for several hours. We look forward to the day when each and every monument to slavery and genocide is taken down and destroyed. Workers World Party is committed to eradicating, not just these hated flags and statues, but every trace of the capitalist system that spawned the crimes against humanity these objects symbolize.The fascist gang assembled at Mount Rushmore is dangerous, as is the rhetoric that pulled it together — the threat must be taken seriously. But we are hopeful! As the monumental movement still unfolding has reminded us, nothing is set in stone.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Differing retail restrictions in Donegal & North “difficult territory”

first_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Facebook Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Previous articleCovid-19: Banning household visits could be a ‘gamechanger’Next articleMinister defends Government approach to move Donegal to Level 4 News Highland Twitter Google+center_img Facebook A Donegal Deputy says the retail sector in Donegal must be protected as the county moves to Level Four.Retail is to remain open in Northern Ireland while non-essential retail is to shut here under the new restrictions.Speaking in the Dail last night, Deputy Joe McHugh says people had started shopping for Christmas, giving businesses some hope of a bounce back financially.Deputy McHugh described the differing restrictions for Donegal and the North as difficult territory:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/joeraw.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter By News Highland – October 15, 2020 AudioHomepage BannerNews Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest Differing retail restrictions in Donegal & North “difficult territory” WhatsApp Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens furtherlast_img read more

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McClafferty seeks banning of vehicles from Donegal beaches

first_img Google+ Renewed calls for full-time Garda in Kilmacrennan Previous article45% of A level grades not upheld at Holy Cross in StrabaneNext articlePSNI warns about scammers after £80,000 is taken from victims News Highland AudioHomepage BannerNews Twitter Facebook Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp By News Highland – August 14, 2020 Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Facebookcenter_img Pinterest A Donegal councillor is seeking to have cars, bikes, quads and other vehicles banned from beaches in Donegal.Cllr Michael Mc Clafferty raised the issue at a recent council meeting, and was told changes to the council’s by-laws can be considered in the context of a review.He expects a review to start later this year, and is hopeful of backing from colleagues.Cllr Mc Clafferty says this is very much a Health and Safety issue…………..Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/michmcclaff.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA WhatsApp Google+ McClafferty seeks banning of vehicles from Donegal beaches Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Gifted thinking…

first_imgGifted thinking…On 10 Dec 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Jonathan Haskell weighs up the pros and cons of selecting corporate giftsWhen it comes to gifts, what is considered highly desirable in one countrycan be boring, uninspired, or even offensive in another. A bottle of quality vodkamay please a Canadian worker, but may be standard and rather dull for a Russianemployee and downright offensive to a Middle Eastern staff member. And thoughthe latest designer electronic gadget may not impress a Japanese executive, itwould probably thrill a European one. LongService.com’s data analysis shows that corporate gift choices areimmensely varied across Europe. Belgium’s top three gifts, for example, arebinoculars, radios and champagne flutes, while Germany’s are juice extractors,cutlery and cocktail shakers, and Sweden favours cappuccino makers, decantersand CD players. Ultimately, gift choices always depend on the selections chosen by HRmanagers and the choices available to employees. But these examples show thateven staff in neighbouring countries have widely different preferences, andthey should be recognised and accommodated by reward programmes. Although some HR managers try to kid themselves that everyone wants anenamelled gold pen or classic crystal ware, the truth is that the world’s 6billion citizens are individuals – with individual tastes. This delicate issue often causes headaches for HR directors trying tointroduce and subsequently administer an international reward programme withminimal time, effort and expense. However, some simple solutions can beimplemented. The sensible way to create a reward scheme that meets the interests ofglobal employees, is by allowing them to select their own gifts. The three mostpopular gift selection options are online rewards, vouchers and brochures. Each system has its benefits and pitfalls, which must be considered bearingthe different international gift preferences in mind. They are: Vouchers – the pros and cons – These flexible rewards can be redeemed for chosen items – Employees know the monetary value of the gift and may be delighted, or mayequally take offence if the company is perceived to have been less thangenerous – If the voucher redeemable in a specialist retailer, (such as a musicstore) the gift options may be limited – The onus is on the employee to redeem the voucher. This is great if staffare shopaholics and the retail outlet is nearby, but difficult for shopaphobicshaving to visit an inconvenient location to find the item they want – Although vouchers are viewed by both HR managers and employees asconvenient, they may be regarded as unimaginative and lacking in thought andeffort – Some HR managers are reviewing their use of vouchers and considering morepersonal, innovative gifts as rewards Brochures – the pros and cons – They allow employees to choose their own gifts which have been selected bythe HR department, and are more relevant to the individual workforce – Agreeing gifts and producing the brochure can be expensive andtime-consuming – Staff cannot resist looking at the sections of the brochure that don’tapply to them (such as the staff receiving a gift for five years’ servicelooking at the gifts for 10 years’ service). They may be then disappointed withtheir own selection – Gifts run out of stock and the employee may be unable to receive they giftselected – If several gifts are no longer available, the company has the expense ofproducing a new updated brochure Online reward schemes – the pros and cons – These dispense with all the common problems of vouchers and brochures – Staff only choose the gifts made available to them – unaware of any otheremployee reward levels – Gift selection can be swiftly changed if stock runs out without cost ordelay – Programmes can be easily tailored for individual departments, countries orreligions so that relevant gifts are available – Online accessibility is available on a global basis (with real time datafeedback). International considerations However, evaluating the correct system for the company is not the onlyimportant issue when implementing a global reward programme. There are otherconsiderations which are often overlooked. Currency can be a real challenge for international gift schemes. Forexample, what if the global HR director decides that for two years’ service,all staff will receive a gift to the value of $250 (£159). In the US, Englandor Japan, that wouldn’t be enough for a night for two in a top hotel. But inTurkey, it would cover the hotel and the spending money too. And while $250 maybe appropriate for an employee of a wealthy country, it would be an extravagantsum in less affluent locations. Gift values should be rewarded as a percentage of income, rather than a flatcurrency rate. If all staff receive a gift that is 10 per cent of their pay,the relative value will be the same regardless of the country or currency.Companies operating international programmes such as Dialog and Sungard havesuccessfully implemented this measure. An extensive logistics network is essential for international rewardprogrammes, and HR managers should expect detailed explanations of systemsbefore signing up with providers of vouchers, brochures or online services. In the case of Dialog and Sungard, the key elements of their rewardprogrammes are flexibility, evaluation and delivery. Both companies recognisethe importance of assessing the programme and providing the opportunity tochange requirements at any time, as well as prompt delivery of gifts – usuallywithin days of selection. Dialog’s programme covers nearly 400 employees in Belgium, Denmark, France,Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland andthe UK. In a typical year, approximately between 100 and 150 employees willreceive a gift. HR directors must consider the pros and cons of each programmebefore making an assessment on which is best for them. Jonathan Haskell is managing director of www.LongService.com, a UK and Europeonline incentive, reward and motivation supplierEssential questions every HR manager should ask their online giftsupplier:– Do you have distribution systemsthat ensure rapid delivery of gifts?– What happens when a gift becomes unavailable?– If an employee is unhappy with a gift selection, whatprocesses are in place for complaints?– What kind of data will be available for evaluation andassessment?– What gifts are available? Are big brands included?– Can gifts be personalised or branded? Will this take extratime?– What is the contractual commitment?– Can the gift selection be tailored for internationalemployees?– What security and data protection systems are in place?– Can my company start on a trial basis?– Approximately how many hours per week will my HR departmentbe spending on administering the programme?– Can I change the gift selection whenever I choose?– What can be arranged for employees who do not have access toa computer? Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Starbucks sees dramatic fall in profits

first_imgRestructuring and “significant transition” for Starbucks Cor-poration has seen its profits crash 96.6% to $5.4m, compared with $158.5m in its fourth quarter last year. The coffee chain’s fourth-quarter results, ended 28 September, and full fiscal 2008 results also reveal a fall in opera-ting profit for the year from $1.1bn in fiscal 2007, to $504m.The firm has said it will be adopting a “more cautious approach” in the UK and Western Europe, with regard to new store openings, with only 700 net new stores planned internationally.In the US, Starbucks’ 2009 store opening target is now “approximately a negative 20 net new stores”, according to the statement. This year saw the closure of approximately 600 company-operated stores in the US and 61 company-owned stores in Australia, costing the firm $105.1m in restructuring and other transformation stra-tegy costs, which affected its net income.last_img read more

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Starbucks eyes acquisitions and new markets

first_imgStarbucks, the global coffee chain, will look at acquisition opportunities, introducing healthier options and opening its first stores in India and Vietnam in the next 24 months.Speaking at the 12th European Foodservice Summit, chairman, president and chief executive Howard Schultz said that acquisition opportunities “would be looked at” and that the company had “$2bn in cash and no debt” at present. Schultz also said that the company, which has around 11,000 outlets in the US and Canada, and 6,000 internationally, would look at expanding into India and Vietnam “in the next year or so”. He said the company was also looking at the “health/wellness” category and that, in terms of introducing healthier options, it had “licence to play in that area”. A number of the group’s US stores have been trialling serving beer and wines and Schultz said that the early feedback on this was “intriguing”, but that the experiment was still at an early stage.last_img read more

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New member for the FOB

first_imgEquipment and plant supplier Bühler Limited has joined The Federation of Bakers (FOB) as an associate member.A division of the Switzerland-based Bühler Group, Bühler designs and equips flour mills for the baking industry. It is a specialist technology partner for process equipment and services for bakeries, as well as premix and food processing plants.Darren Frost, sales manager – milling and baking at Bühler, said: “We look forward to continuing to strengthen our relationship with the UK’s largest baking companies with the opportunities and services that come with The Federation of Baker’s associate membership.”Gordon Polson, director of the FOB, added: “We are delighted to welcome Bühler as a new associate member, and hope to support them as they continue to grow their global business.”In May the FOB focused its annual conference on the challenges facing the food industry.last_img read more

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Freshmen arrive, with boxes

first_img 2Carrying her cello across the Yard, Danielle Davis ’21 arrives to collect her key. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 5Freshmen Jude Tochukwu Okonkwo (left) and Destana Herring stand at the front of the line for their keys. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Vanessa Roser ’21 (left), from Merion Station, Pa., carries boxes up to her new room. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 4Case Mckinley ’21 (from left) meets with Nayiri Ayanian ’18, proctor Jon Rossi, and freshman adviser Rachel Brown in front of Weld Hall. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 6President Faust (from left) and Dean of Freshmen Tom Dingman meet with students and families, including Ruva Chigwedere ’21 and her mother Lorine, from Florham Park, N.J., in front of Canaday Hall. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 16Jeff and Ling Li watch as their daughter, Katelyn ’21, says goodbye to the friends she made hiking in the woods with the Freshman Outdoors Program. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Early on move-in day, Jessika Nebrat ’18 gathers balloons to mark the freshmen residences in Harvard Yard. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 3Freshmen line up at the key-distribution tent. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 19Eight-year-old Tomas Young pulls into Harvard Yard in the family car with his brother, incoming freshman Fernando Young. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Fernando Young ’21 has help from his dad, Chris, moving into his Stoughton Hall room from Nantucket. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 7Family members Patricia (from left), Allyson, and Elias help Gabriela Ochoa ’21, from Whitehall, Penn., as they meet Gabriela’s roommate Reeda Iqbal ’21 from Bayshore, N.Y., in front of Thayer Hall. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 11President Faust greets University Police Officer Jim Melia in the Yard. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 12Dasha Bough ’21 (center) with her parents, Loren and Jill, are pictured in the Yard. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 13Transporting recycling bins is a balancing act. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 18Leah Smart (right) has help from her mother, Dee, to move into Straus Hall from their home in Charlotte, N.C. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 14Esme Benson (left) and her mother, Michele Polacsek of Portland, Maine, talk with Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 17Yena Cho ’20 (center) helps direct families to the residence halls in the Yard. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer Harvard Yard awoke again Tuesday morning after its annual summer slumber, as the Class of 2021 officially arrived on campus.As Harvard President Drew Faust, Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith, Danoff Dean of Harvard College Rakesh Khurana, and Dean of Freshmen Thomas Dingman walked around the Yard to greet the newcomers and their families, students carried cartons, pulled suitcases, and lugged small appliances into dorm rooms. Teams of peer advisors and College staff were quick to provide assistance.Thanks to a record high yield, more than 1,600 students make up the latest class. Nearly half of its members are female. Geographical origins are much the same as last year, but the Class of 2021 is more economically diverse than last year’s freshmen. Nearly 24 percent qualified for the low-income portion of the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative; more than 19 percent requested application fee waivers; 17 percent are eligible for Pell grants; and 15 percent are first-generation college students. 15Sarah Rodriguez ’21 gets help making her bed from her mother, Debbie Rodriguez. They traveled from their home in Rhinebeck, N.Y. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 10Dean of the College Rakesh Khurana greets students. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer  Please join in the conversation via #HarvardMoveIn and #Harvard2021 on Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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