Mishawaka man sentenced for child molestation

first_imgIndianaLocalNews WhatsApp Google+ Google+ Twitter By 95.3 MNC – October 8, 2020 1 363 Pinterest Pinterest Mishawaka man sentenced for child molestation Facebook Facebook WhatsApp Twitter (Photo supplied/St. Joseph County Jail) A Mishawaka man who admitted having inappropriate sexual contact with a minor has been sentenced.Elliott Ewing was arrested last December and pleaded guilty to three counts of sexual misconduct with a minor, child exploitation and dissemination of matter harmful to minors as part of a plea agreement.In exchange, rape and child molesting charges were dismissed. Ewing confessed to the crime, saying he did it because his wife wouldn’t have sex with him.He’ll serve 12 years in prison. Previous articleUniveristy Park Mall shooting suspect appears in courtNext articleMan, 43, found dead inside mobile home on Locust Road was shot to death 95.3 MNCNews/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel is your breaking news and weather station for northern Indiana and southwestern Michigan.last_img read more

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Back into the dark

first_imgSo much for the warmup laps.Harvard physicists are looking with anticipation to the spring, when the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Switzerland, fires up after a two-year hiatus for repairs and upgrades. The last time it was running, science celebrated the discovery of the Higgs boson, a long-sought elementary particle and the last one predicted by the Standard Model.There may be a lot more to come. The Higgs discovery was made before the LHC ever got to full power. It was running at just 8 teraelectron volts (TeV) — higher than any collider had ever run, but far short of its designed 14 TeV maximum.The upgrades and repairs since early 2013 are expected to allow the collider to run at 13 TeV. The results are anybody’s guess.“That’s what’s exciting about it,” said Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics Melissa Franklin. “If we knew what we were going to find, we’d all just go home.”Physicists knew that the LHC, the most powerful collider in history, would take them to a new energy frontier as it began operating in 2008. At the same time, they had a pretty good sense of what they’d find.The Standard Model of physics had proven remarkably durable over the preceding decades. One by one, experimentalists had found each of the 40 particles it predicted — bottom quark, top quark, W and Z bosons. All save one: the Higgs boson.The discovery would prove that the theorized Higgs field, present throughout the universe, actually existed. The particle was believed to be the physical manifestation of that field, and to carry the force that gives particles mass. The find would also explain why some particles were heavier than others: They interacted more strongly with the Higgs boson.So, with decades of theorizing behind them and the prior particle discoveries as evidence that the Standard Model was correct, physicists were pretty sure the Higgs boson was out there.But now …“It’s sort of like you’re Arctic explorers, and though you knew that there were some milestones to be seen or predicted, you’ve gone past that. Now you’re really into the unknown at this point and one doesn’t really know what to expect,” said Donner Professor of Science John Huth, who has been involved since 1995 with the Large Hadron Collider’s ATLAS experiment.Mysteries abound Though the Higgs boson completes the Standard Model, that doesn’t mean there’s nothing left to find — far from it. “Out there” remains an open question, mostly.Current models hold that the stuff we know about — ourselves, our cars, our houses, the solar system, interstellar dust, etc. — makes up just about 5 percent of the universe. A big chunk of the rest, 27 percent, is something called dark matter, whose gravitational effects astrophysicists see as they peer into the skies, but whose nature remains a mystery. The remainder — roughly 68 percent — is dark energy, about which scientists understand even less. (Chris Stubbs, the Samuel C. Moncher Professor of Physics and of Astronomy, is one of the number who are on the case, albeit at the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope in Chile rather than the LHC.)Other mysteries include how gravity is related to the other three main forces in the universe: electromagnetism and the strong and weak forces that operate in the atomic nucleus. Today they’re explained by separate theories. A theorized particle, the graviton, that might carry the gravitational force, has never been seen. There’s also the question of whether supersymmetry — thought to include a whole new family of particles — is real. And then there’s the possibility that the Higgs boson hasn’t been fully described.“It’s both exciting and scary because, on one hand, we could [find] significant, really new physics that could explain a heck of a lot and all of a sudden the pieces line up in terms of cosmology,” Huth said. “On the other hand, [we could find that] everything works out exactly as predicted, that there’s nothing new and you’re left with, ‘Now what?’ You put a lot into it, and you’d like to see something come out, but as an experimentalist, you have to let Mother Nature tell you what’s out there.”Huth and his Harvard colleagues are ready to listen. He’d like to hear in particular what else she has to say about the Higgs, as would Franklin and Associate Professor Joao Guimaraes da Costa. Masahiro Morii, chair of the Physics Department, is especially interested in dark matter and supersymmetry.ATLAS will no doubt be a factor in their investigations. The experiment — a collaboration of 3,000 scientists in 38 countries in which Harvard physicists have played a leading role — has been a hub for the four University faculty members, six postdoctoral fellows, and 11 graduate students connected to the LHC.ATLAS — “a toroidal LHC apparatus” — is one of four enormous detectors arranged around the LHC’s 17-mile underground ring. When operating, the LHC accelerates beams of protons in opposite directions and crosses them inside ATLAS. The collisions happen so rapidly and generate so much data that scientists have to apply filters and examine only the most promising results. Even so, there are 200 such “events” each second, generating an enormous amount of information for analysis, an amount equal each year to 160 times the volume of books in the Library of Congress, according to ATLAS statistics.Melissa Franklin (front, center) is joined by physics teaching fellows Stephen Chan (from left) and Karri Folan DiPetrillo and Hugh Skottowe, a research associate in physics. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerOnward to supersymmetry Having established the existence of the Higgs, physicists plan to use the LHC’s higher energy to probe the particle’s properties, including how it couples to other particles, whether there are multiple kinds of Higgs bosons, why it is so light, and how often it decays into different particles. The upgraded collider should generate particles more rapidly in the years to come and thus create more opportunities for study.“There is no doubt that there is a particle we found that has the characteristics of and behaves like the Higgs boson,” Guimaraes said. “But it’s not exactly the Higgs boson described in the Standard Model.”“We have only measured some properties and we haven’t measured them well,” said postdoctoral fellow David López Mateos, who is working with Huth. “We have a duty to [find out] that it is the Higgs of the Standard Model, and we may find some new physics along the way.”The Higgs will also be used as a tool to bring other secrets to light, said physicist Chris Rogan, a junior fellow in Harvard’s Society of Fellows. Because certain particles interact with partner particles — think protons and electrons — the revelation of an unknown particle that interacts with the Higgs is possible.“There are all sorts of unanswered questions. We don’t know what the answers are going to be, but we do know they lie at higher energy scales,” Rogan said.Supersymmetry, dating to the 1960s, is a theory of the universe that builds on the Standard Model. It suggests that each of the known particles once had a symmetric partner that looked a lot like it, save for the property of spin. Somehow, in a fraction of the universe’s first second, that initial symmetry broke, changing the properties of the partner particles. One of the changes was that they became heavier, meaning they can only be produced in collisions more powerful than any we’ve seen so far.Some scientists consider supersymmetry a possible successor to the Standard Model because it would fill holes in our understanding of how the universe works. When the collider starts up again in the spring, Morii and Rogan will be among those on the lookout for symmetric partner particles — squarks, gluinos, and others.“It really could solve a lot of problems all at once,” Rogan said.A prime candidate, Morii said, would be the supersymmetric partner to the top quark, called the top squark, because the Higgs couples more strongly to heavier particles and the top quark is the heaviest.Others, though, aren’t so sure about supersymmetry. Guimaraes said it is a bit too neat to be believed.“It’s a pretty theory, so people want it, but there’s lots of pretty things that don’t exist,” Guimaraes said. “As an experimentalist, you have to go with what you see.”One area of consensus is that a new understanding of dark matter may be in the offing. Unlike the search for evidence of supersymmetry, the search for dark matter has the advantage of physicists knowing it exists. That’s because astrophysicists have detected the gravitational effects of an enormous amount of invisible matter in the universe tugging on the things that they can see.So physicists are rummaging in their bag of tricks for ways to detect an almost invisible particle — one that doesn’t interact with any known particle, is heavy enough that it hasn’t been generated before, and is very stable, with almost infinite life.“It can’t be too hard to make or there wouldn’t have been a lot made in the Big Bang,” Morii said.One way to search would be through “monojets,” or single particles shooting off at an angle, apparently from a collision with an undetected particle. The laws of physics dictate that the particle must have bounced off something — a clue that investigators such as postdoctoral fellow Valerio Ippolito are studying more closely.It’s even possible, according to Morii, that researchers will kill two birds with one stone, tracing dark matter to a supersymmetric particle, something called a neutralino.“In a sense, we are at a point where there is no one thing that we know has to exist,” Morii said. “Dark matter has to exist, but there’s many different possible shapes. Higgs mass stabilization has to happen, but supersymmetry is only one possible explanation. … We are searching, but we know very well that we’re searching for something that doesn’t have to exist.”Indeed, there are no guarantees in physics. Franklin cautioned that a higher-energy beam doesn’t necessarily mean that new discoveries are around the corner. There have been large droughts between particle breakthroughs despite increasingly powerful accelerators, she pointed out. The discovery in 1995 of the top quark at Fermilab — an effort both Huth and Franklin were involved in — was preceded by 12 particle-less years, after the W and Z bosons were discovered in 1983.Learning while doingThough activity at the LHC is focused on research, the work also helps train graduate and undergraduate students. Huth and Franklin said the educational opportunities include hands-on construction as well as the kind done on computers.ATLAS and the LHC have been as much a part of doctoral student Tomo Lazovich’s Harvard experience as House life and the Yard. He began working with Franklin at Fermilab in Illinois the summer after his freshman year in 2008. The following summer, he went to CERN for the first time to work on commissioning the ATLAS detector.Lazovich graduated from the College in 2011 and started graduate school that fall. He worked on the rapid decay of Higgs particles into two W bosons, an important process to understand because the Higgs, when it can be produced, exists for only a fraction of a second before it decays into other particles. It is through detailed analysis of these “decay paths” that scientists detect the Higgs.Lazovich plans to be on hand when the collider restarts.“It’s been amazing just having the intellectual experience. Even the possibility of coming to Harvard as a high school student seemed a remote thing. The whole experience has been surreal.”Nothing will be revealed without a lot of hard work. Faculty members, fellows, and students are immersed in prep work.The upgrades, as big as everything else to do with LHC, are being carried out by investigators and students from 15 institutions, including Harvard, Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Weitzmann Institute of Science.Harvard’s portion of the job is work on the muon detector at ATLAS’ heart, a hulking cube in a bay at 38 Oxford St. Electronics are being refined at offices in nearby Palfrey House.“That’s so great in terms of people learning,” Franklin said. “It’s nice having the undergraduates do real stuff, and not just work on the computer.”Meanwhile, the spring’s “first beam” draws nearer.“I see the last run almost as a test run,” said Rogan. “The real opportunities for discovery are right around the corner. If any new physics live just beyond our reach, it could pop out quite quickly, which would be very exciting and which is why we’re expending a lot of effort making sure we’re ready.”last_img read more

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Almir Kapic is the World Champion in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

first_imgAlmir Kapic, the BiH Jiu Jitsu fighter, became the world champion in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in the open division at the competition “Abu Dhabi World Professional Jiu-Jitsu Championship 2016”, which was held in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. Also, Kapic was the Vice Champion of the world in the ultra-heavy weight division.Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a martial art in which the fight is mostly taking place on the ground in order to obtain a dominant position, with the use of levers on arms, shoulders, legs or neck compression.This sport arose by modifying the Japanese Jiu Jitsu by the Gracie family.(Source: svjetlo-dunjaluka.com)last_img read more

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Five things we learned in the Premier League

first_imgArsenal Players celebrate after scoring against Palace on Saturday, they beat Palace 4-1 with Sanchez left out .London, United Kingdom | AFP | Manchester City resumed normal service in the Premier League, putting their defeat against Liverpool behind them with a 3-1 victory against Newcastle as Alexis Sanchez closed in on a move to Manchester United.Elsewhere, Arsenal showed a positive glimpse of life post-Sanchez while Chelsea notched their first Premier League win of 2018 and Tottenham dropped points against struggling Southampton.Here are five things we learned from the Premier League this weekend:Arsenal rout offers hope for life after SanchezThe street vendor selling Alexis Sanchez T-shirts at half-price outside the Emirates Stadium appeared to have caught the prevailing mood about the Arsenal forward’s impending move to Manchester United. While Sanchez produced plenty of memorable moments in north London, he departs a divisive figure. Having spent much of the past year in an apparent sulk over Arsenal’s underachievement and the club’s refusal to sell him, Sanchez was seen by some as more trouble than even his sublime skills were worth and, encouragingly for Gunners boss Arsene Wenger, his players seem liberated by the approaching end of the transfer saga. They crushed Crystal Palace 4-1 without Sanchez and vibrant displays from Alex Iwobi and Mesut Ozil suggested it won’t be all doom and gloom without the former Barcelona star.Sane helps calm Man City nervesSergio Aguero’s latest hat-trick saw Manchester City’s record goalscorer grab most of the headlines following the Premier League leaders’ 3-1 win at home to Newcastle. But it was no surprise that Leroy Sane received just as many congratulatory hugs from manager Pep Guardiola. Having dominated the match, City were faltering when Newcastle pulled a goal back against the run of play to make it 2-1. Fresh from losing their unbeaten league run the previous week to Liverpool, it was a worrying time for Guardiola and his side. But the 22-year-old Sane calmed nerves at the Etihad with a superb run and cross that set up the decisive third goal for Aguero. Hazard inspires championsAn in-form Eden Hazard makes Chelsea tick. The 27-year-old Belgian had scored just one goal in his previous 11 games but his double on Saturday — the first bringing up a landmark century of career league goals, came in a 4-0 dismantling of Brighton. However, a cloud hangs over his future at Stamford Bridge, with Hazard yet to commit himself to a new contract against a background of apparent interest from Real Madrid. That uncertainty, together with the reported discontent of manager Antonio Conte over a lack of purchases, overshadows the club’s 12-match unbeaten run.Martial times run perfectlyFrench forward Anthony Martial has not always been a firm favourite of manager Jose Mourinho and has had to bide his time among a clutch of hungry forwards vying for limited places in attack. But with Alexis Sanchez on the verge of arriving at Old Trafford, Martial, who scored the only goal in a 1-0 victory against Burnley, has chosen the perfect time to hit a purple patch, scoring three goals in his past three Premier League games to press his claim for a first-team starting berth. “(There are) no doubts that from last season to this season (there has been) a great improvement from Anthony and we need that,” Mourinho told Sky Sports.Kane is poacher supreme but Spurs stumbleSpurs striker Harry Kane has scored nine goals in his past five starts in the Premier League, with all nine coming from inside the box. His equaliser in the 1-1 draw against Southampton was his 33rd goal of a stellar season for club and country but Tottenham’s inability to beat struggling Saints could cost them dear in their chase for a Champions League place, with a fiendish run coming up. Mauricio Pochettino’s side are two points behind fourth-placed Liverpool, who have a game in hand. Their next three Premier League fixtures are against Manchester United, Liverpool and Arsenal.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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SANTA ANITA OAKS QUOTES – SATURDAY APRIL 9, 2016

first_imgNOTES: The winning owner is Rick Porter of Lexington, Ky., who races as Fox Hill Farms, Inc. The Santa Anita Oaks is worth 100 Kentucky Oaks qualifying points to the winner, 40 for second, 20 for third and 10 for fourth. FLAVIEN PRAT, MOKAT, SECOND: ​”She ran great. I mean, that was the game plan, to try to win second which is what we did. I think she ran really good, it’s just that the winner was just way too good for her. But I am really impressed with her and the way she ran today.” TRAINER QUOTES JERRY HOLLENDORFER, SONGBIRD, WINNER: “I had a little bit of anticipation with the off track, wondering if she could handle it or not. A couple of the horses earlier had stickers on and won, but we didn’t put any on. I don’t think any of the others guys in this race did, either. We didn’t want her slipping, but she didn’t slip, so that’s good.”Asked if she continues to surprise him: “No. She’s always been well thought of and she’s done everything we’ve asked her and we thought she would do that today. We have the point race coming up (the $1 million Kentucky Oaks at Churchill Downs on May 6), so if we have good fortune and she stays sound, we’ll try to go to Kentucky and win that one.” JOCKEY QUOTES RICK PORTER, SONGBIRD, WINNER: “If it doesn’t make an owner smile the way she’s been running, maybe you should try another business. It’s so fun to watch.“We always figured that she could handle an off track. We’ve found that most really good horses can handle any kind of surface – today, she didn’t show us anything different. It’s so exciting to see the horse perform time after time unasked. I’m so fortunate to have a horse like this.”(On whether he’s considering running Songbird in the Kentucky Derby rather than the Oaks)“No. I planned from the very beginning . . . I thought that at her age, particularly with Jerry’s viewpoints (that he doesn’t like to run against the boys), we’d keep her on the filly path. There’s a lot of good races, and there will be a time, if she’s good enough, to take on the boys. I think she’s too young to take on the boys with that 20-horse stampede (in the Kentucky Derby). I think the (Breeders’ Cup Classic) would be too tough for her as a three-year-old.” MIKE SMITH, SONGBIRD, WINNER: “She’s just incredible. I feel so blessed and I keep pinching myself, having to remind myself that I’m the one that gets to keep the weight on her. That’s really all I do. She’s so professional, so good at everything.“She was spinning her wheels a little bit going into the first turn but once we got to the backside, she found her rhythm and she got comfortable and it was all her again.“It’s pretty slick. It’s safe, it’s got a bottom, but it’s a little slick on top. She ran with normal shoes and was spinning just a little bit leaving the gate but once she was moving forward she was fine.”last_img read more

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Scientists Need to Get Out More

first_imgStrict application of the “scientific method” is blinding some scientists to the real world, two authors claim.We need a new science to get “back to the future,” a press release from the University of Arizona claims – actually, “back to the past” might be more accurate.  Two U of A researchers have a new book out saying scientists need to get out more, like they used to.Mars rover Curiosity is doing it. School children strolling through the woods with binoculars are doing it. Charles Darwin was doing it. Observing the natural world around them was how the early naturalists started what would later become known as ecology – the science of how living things interact, depend on each other and how their habitats and communities change over time.In their book, “Observation and Ecology,” ecologists Rafe Sagarin and Aníbal Pauchard make the case that if scientists are to tackle the enormously complex problems the world is facing, researchers and funding agencies have to leave their comfort zone of well-controlled experimental manipulations.Sagarin and Pauchard argue that a strict indoor application of the so-called “scientific method” (a philosophically vexed notion), i.e., testing hypotheses in the lab, cannot provide insight into complex problems that have too many variables.  Direct observation, though, like getting outside and walking around with one’s eyes open, can.  They apply this to global warming.  No amount of modeling can surpass the simple act of getting out and observing what animals and plants are being affected by climate change.Even historical records and tribal legends can be useful to scientists.  Those can’t be tested in a laboratory; they need observers willing to get out and find them.  Some field experiments, further, might be unethical, like moving animals to a different habitat to see if they suffer.  Better to observe them in their real habitats.People used to do more observing outdoors, they point out.  “In the 1930s, more people in the U.S. went to birding parties than to professional baseball games,” Sagarin said.  While technology tends to drive scientists (and teenagers) more indoors, it doesn’t have to; for instance, groups of young people can take their smart phones and collect data over wide areas with data-sharing apps.  These might lead to fundamental insights by citizen scientists.The authors are trying to supplement lab science, not supplant it; they also argue that they are not trying to take science back to “stamp collecting” (merely cataloging observations and classifying things).  But large numbers of observations, they argue, can inform the kinds of experiments worthy of testing.We post this not so much to agree with all they say, but as an illustration that the so-called “scientific method” is not set in stone.  This story also points out that “sociology of science” affects the kinds of questions scientists ask and what they consider significant.  Further, it illustrates that science “evolves” over time; even Darwin, they point out, spent a lot more time looking at nature than many evolutionists today who concoct models out of data sets and computerized organisms.  (Too bad Darwin didn’t have an electronic microscope or history might have been different – perhaps a much earlier Intelligent Design Movement.)Most will probably agree that it is worthwhile to get out into nature and be more observant.  There’s no substitute for real world learning. (Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Fossil Flaw Tosses Years of Evolutionary Research

first_imgFossils may be real, but the methods used to analyze them have come under fire, with implications for Darwinian theory.It can ruin your whole day. Finding that, after years of work, your assumptions undermine everything you believed can be hard to take. But that’s exactly what scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Reading (UK) announced: “Flawed analysis casts doubt on years of evolutionary research.” What went wrong?Years of research on the evolution of ancient life including the dinosaurs have been questioned after a fatal flaw in the way fossil data is analysed was exposed.Studies based on the apparently flawed method have suggested Earth’s biodiversity remained relatively stable – close to maximum carrying capacity – and hinted many signs of species becoming rapidly extinct are merely reflections on the poor quality of the fossil record at that time.However, new research by scientists at the University of Reading suggests the history of the planet’s biodiversity may have been more dynamic than recently suggested, with bursts of new species appearing, along with crashes and more stable periods.The new study, published in Methods in Ecology and Evolution by Dr Manabu Sakamoto and Dr Chris Venditti, from Reading, and Professor Michael Benton, from Bristol, says a technique used to ‘correct’ records of diversity in fossils is actually giving misleading results.  It means almost a decade’s worth of work aimed at providing an insight into evolution may be misleading as it was based on this fundamental error.The ‘residual diversity method’ for correcting sampling bias in the fossil record was first used in 2007. According to the paper’s summary, “the unorthodox way in which these residuals are generated presents serious statistical problems; the response and predictor variables are decoupled through independent sorting, rendering the new bivariate relationship meaningless.” Some studies can be up to 100% wrong, the press release says.The researchers ran thousands of simulations to test the data correction method, but found it failed to return correct results in as much as 100% of the simulated cases.Professor Mike Benton, Earth Scientist at University of Bristol, said: “The core assumption is that any portion of fossil diversity that can be explained by variations in rock volume should be explained by variations in rock volume. This assumption is based on no evidence.“At the extreme, if you have no rock you get no fossils. However, there are many cases where two time intervals are represented by the same amount of rock worldwide, and yet fossil diversity varies massively. Explain that.“According to the summary, “The large number of recent papers that used the method are likely to have produced misleading results and their implications should be reassessed.” One of the authors argued earlier this year that dinosaurs were already going extinct before the asteroid hit.But will the paper’s suggestions improve things? The authors say that “Evolutionary dynamics such as speciation are inherently a phylogenetic process, and only an explicitly phylogenetic approach will correctly model this process.” This means that to interpret rocks in an evolutionary way, you have to start by believing in evolution. That’s circular reasoning. If the fossils are not a record of Darwinian common descent over millions of years, any phylogenetic approach could also “fail to return correct results in as much as 100% of simulated cases.”A case of the blind leading the blind into the ditch. Time to ditch natural selection (see 10/03/15).(Visited 86 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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How to Create a GIF Using After Effects and Photoshop

first_imgThis easy-to-follow step-by-step tutorial will show you how to quickly create an animated GIF using After Effects and Photoshop.More and more clients are demanding GIF files of their projects for social media. Rather than relying on a third-party GIF compressor that may create too much heavy noise, make your GIF look clean and professional using After Effects and Photoshop.In the following video tutorial, we’ll take a look at how to create an animated GIF using After Effects and Photoshop and discuss a few things you need to know in order to create the best GIF possible. The tutorial covers:Creating GIFsWorking with DitheringReducing File SizesOptimal Frame RatesColor DepthHere’s the tutorial. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask us in the comments below. Alternatively, if you prefer to read (over watching a video), you can follow the step-by-step guide below.Download the Free Project File and PremiumGuide to GIFsIn addition to the tutorial itself, we are giving away the project file, video clips, and the PremiumGuide to GIFs. Simply click the download button below and all of the assets are yours.DOWNLOAD FREE PROJECT FILES AND THE PREMIUMGUIDE TO GIFSStep-by-Step Tutorial: Create a GIFThe following step-by-step tutorial will show you everything you need to know to quickly create GIFs in After Effects and Photoshop.Step 1: Export Video From After EffectsThere isn’t a great way to export a GIF from an After Effects composition. So after you have created your animated sequence, follow these steps to export your composition to Photoshop.The first thing you need to do is simply export your footage from After Effects. Select your composition and go to Composition > Add to Render Queue. Once inside the render queue, adjust your settings as needed and click the ‘Render’ button. Remember that the best way to reduce the file size of your GIF is to optimize the video in After Effects — be sure to change your frame rate to 12-15fps and reduce the amount of movement and colors.Step 2: Import into PhotoshopGo to Photoshop and import your clip by navigating to File > Open and selecting the video clip. You can now adjust your clip as needed. Many of the functions inside of Photoshop will still be available to you. You can colorize and scale your video just like an image.Step 3: Save for Web.Once you’re ready to save your GIF, simply navigate to File > Save for Web… (In older versions of Photoshop, you’ll need to navigate to File > Export > Save for Web(Legacy), but it’s the same window nonetheless.) Once you’re inside of the Save for Web window, you will see a lot of options.The video tutorial above goes into detail about what each setting does, but the important thing to remember is simply to reduce the amount of colors and only turn on dithering if you are comfortable with noise being in your image. Alternatively, if you would like for your GIF to load a low-res version before it loads the full-res version, go ahead and select the ‘Interlaced’ button. The rest of the defaults are usually great. If you want your GIF to loop, be sure to change Looping Options from ‘Once’ to ‘Forever.’Once you’re ready to save, simply navigate to the ‘Save’ button at the bottom of the window.If you want to learn more about creating GIFs or how they work in After Effects, I personally recommend checking out the “GIFs in After Effects” post over on RocketStock.You also may have noticed the professional transitions used in the tutorial. Those transitions come from Stanza, an exclusive pack of 200 video transitions from RocketStock. Stanza is the fastest way to create professional video transitions. Here’s a quick demo of Stanza in action:What’s you favorite way to create GIFs in After Effects? Share your thoughts in the comments below.last_img read more

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Five Things That Prevent You from Succeeding at Prospecting

first_imgSelling activities fall into two categories. The first is opportunity creation, the second, opportunity capture. The first necessarily precedes the second. If your sales results are not what you want them to be, look first to opportunity creation and prospecting. If you are not getting the results you want, here are a few things that might be missing.No Talk Tracks: I love scripts. I call them planned dialogues. You might call them talk tracks. In a complex, dynamic human interaction, there are countless variables. But it is possible to count the different responses you are likely to encounter when you interrupt someone and ask them for their time. The expectation that one talk track will work for all scenarios is just not true. You have to vary your approach and change things up. You do need talk tracks, and you do need chops.No Courage to Ask Again: When you interrupt someone to ask them for an appointment, many people will decline your request. They are trying to protect their time, and they are trying not to waste it on things that aren’t important to them now. This is reflexive, and you must ask again, increasing the value you are offering to trade for their time.No Campaigns: You call your dream client in January. You have a lot of targets, so you call them again in April. Then July, then October. This isn’t prospecting. It isn’t strategic enough, there isn’t enough activity, and it isn’t creating value for your target client. It’s sporadic, and it is not serious. If you don’t have more touches, and more interactions closer together, what you are doing can no longer be called prospecting.No Call Blocks: If there is not time blocked on your calendar, then you are not going to produce the prospecting results you need. For a salesperson, call block protects the time you need from the outside distractions that, while needing your attention, prevent you from building a pipeline. Prospecting time is sacred time, and you need to carve enough of it to generate the opportunities you need.Too Little Activity: You may not like that the fact that you can’t generate the opportunities you need with the amount of activity you prefer to spend prospecting, but that does not change the reality that if what you are doing isn’t working, you need to change something. You can have all of the four points above, but it you dial two numbers a day, none of it will amount to anything. Greater activity cures activity problems. Greater effectiveness cures effectiveness problems. Know which is preventing your success. Treat opportunity creation as if it is equally important as opportunity capture. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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