Spaniard fires warning to DeGale

first_imgSpaniard Jose Maria Guerrero has warned James DeGale to knock him out early or face a shock defeat.The pair will meet at the Liverpool Echo Arena on 9 December, when DeGale will defend his WBO Intercontintental super-middleweight title against the wily 34-year-old.DeGale’s European crown will not be on the line as the Harlesden man is expected to make a February defence of that title against mandatory challenger Cristian Sanavia, who is not yet ready to fight.And Guerrero insists DeGale is in for a rude awakening if he regards next month’s clash – which will be screened live on Box Nation (Sky channel 456) – as a warm-up bout.Promoter Frank Warren wants DeGale to fight for a world title next year.Guerrero declared: “I will give him some advice: destroy me quickly. If not, you will have a big problem.“If he thinks that this is the easiest fight of his career then he will have a big surprise.“This is the biggest opportunity of my career and I will make all the necessary arrangements for me to win and come back to Spain with the title.“I’m not accepting this opportunity for money. I’m accepting it because I will win and fight for the world title myself next year.”Guerrero has a record of 29-2-1, with one of his two losses coming against German Mario Veit, who once challenged Joe Calzaghe for the world title.“In my life I only know boxing so if I want a good future I can’t lose this fight. My options are win or win,” he added.“I think that this hunger is my strength. I need to win and I will win. I want to show the world who Jose Maria Guerrero is.”Related stories:Injury rules Groves out of Liverpool fightLet history decidelast_img read more

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Higgins eyeing victory number three

first_imgKilburn middleweight Alan Higgins will be looking to make it three stoppage victories out of three when he faces Italian Matteo Cecchetto at York Hall in Bethnal Green on Sunday.Higgins followed a first-round win on his professional debut with another explosive display last time out, when he travelled to Finland to stop Richard Hadju in two rounds.And the 24-year-old, who will have a three-inch height advantage over Cecchetto, believes he can dispose of him in similar fashion.“He’s 5ft 9in and his last fight was at light-heavyweight, so he’s a strong, stocky guy I expect to come forward,” Higgins told West London Sport.“I should be able to keep my distance and land my shots. I’d like to win by knockout and I think I can.”He added: “I’m getting great experience – this will be three different nationalities I’ll have faced already.“The training and sparring have gone really well. I’m just looking forward to Sunday now.”See also:Kilburn boxer Higgins set for pro debut Perfect start for Kilburn boxer HigginsHiggins wins on professional debutSecond victory for Kilburn’s 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Raiders wary of giving ‘Hard Knocks’ too much access

first_imgIf the Raiders had their way, NFL Films’ “Hard Knocks” crew wouldn’t be allowed to shoot footage of sensitive meetings for their HBO documentary series, such as when players get cut from the team this summer.Coach Jon Gruden and new general manager Mike Mayock are hesitant to allow cameras in the room for positional meetings, or when delivering dream-crushing news to players, a team source told this news organization.On Friday, Mayock told reporters that having the 32-person crew at their …last_img read more

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The Day Facebook Changed Forever: Messages to Become Public By Default (UPDATED)

first_imgmarshall kirkpatrick Related Posts One of the most anticipated days in the history of social networking site Facebook has finally come: the company announced today that it has begun making status messages, photos and videos visible to the public at large by default instead of being visible only to a user’s approved friends.UPDATE:After we wrote this post, Facebook HQ emailed to tell us that the first wave of users who get this feature will have their messages made public by default because their profiles were already marked as public, but that when they open the feature up to subsequent users – those users will have default privacy settings that match their pre-existing profile privacy settings. Unfortunately, in our tests so far (see our screencast) – we haven’t been able to successfully change our default message settings back to friends-only, it stays stuck on public. When we switch our test account from profile public to profile private and then back again, the default for message posting gets stuck at “friends of friends!” So there are some kinks to work out here. However, it appears that we may have jumped the gun and assumed something that was not said in the Facebook blog post: that the experience of all users was going to be like the experience of the first users. The feature appears not to be working correctly and it certainly wasn’t communicated about well, but Facebook now tells us that it will not be opening things up quite like we characterized in this post. We apologize for writing a long blog post based on an understanding of the situation that appears to have been wrong. For what it’s worth – we think Facebook should get more messages out into the public so they can be analyzed, but we also think they should communicate carefully about privacy settings so that people can ease into it as best suits them. Read on for a discussion of the pros and cons of Facebook messages going public.Private by default has been a hallmark characteristic of Facebook, as high on the list as the lack of MySpace garishness. It’s been key in making Facebook the biggest social network on earth. Now that’s about to change. Facebook has been very careful to avoid the major backlash that it has seen in the past when making substantial changes to things like privacy settings, but it’s hard to imagine there isn’t going to be a backlash. From a web innovation perspective, the move could lead to some of the most exciting developments we’ve seen yet from the world of social media.Users can change their default privacy settings back to what it used to be – but that’s not in Facebook the Company’s best interests and we don’t expect to see site-wide prompts about this like we did about the availability of “vanity URLs.”Update: Facebook just emailed us to say that they will in fact be making an effort to make sure everyone knows what their privacy setting is and that it is what they want it to be. From that email:Your Publisher Privacy will stay at whatever you have set as the default. In addition, the first time you try to share something with the privacy control set to “Everyone,” you’ll be asked to confirm that this is what you want to do. If it’s not what you want to do, you’ll be able to change your setting before publishing.The first time you change the setting on the Publisher control, you’ll be asked if you want to make the new setting your default, and you’ll be given a chance to do this in-line. You can also change your default at any time by going to the Privacy Settings Page and clicking on Profile. From there, scroll down to “Publisher Control Default” and choose what you would like as your default privacy setting. Remember the News Feed?When Facebook launched its News Feed feature in September 2006, displaying all activity by a user’s friends in a flowing list of updates on the page, the backlash shook the young service to its core. The News Feed is now the central feature of the Facebook user experience. The new public visibility of shared messages is going to change Facebook on that kind of scale.Remember Beacon?When Facebook launched its off-site advertising initiative called Beacon, users were seeing things like the purchase of a surprise engagement ring on Overstock.com exposed to a would-be wife on Facebook because people didn’t understand how to deal with the new integration of 3rd party sites. The backlash was so big that Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg had to try and calm Barbara Walters down about it on national television. Beacon didn’t disappear but was reformed in a more palatable way. The backlash against public default visibility is going to resemble the Beacon backlash, if not dwarf it.Facebook NakedAnd now we’re at today. By default, all your messages on Facebook will soon be naked visible to the world. The company is starting by rolling out the feature to people who had already set their profiles as public, but it will come to everyone soon. You’ll be able each time you publish a message to change that message’s privacy setting and from that drop down there’s a link to change your default setting.But most people will not change the setting. Facebook messages are about to be publicly visible. A whole lot of people are going to hate it. When ex-lovers, bosses, moms, stalkers, cops, creeps and others find out what people have been posting on Facebook – the reprimand that “well, you could have changed your default setting” is not going to sit well with people. We’re sure it won’t be retroactive and a lot of people will back out of being public, but it could still be a game changer.Robots FTWThe soft fleshed creatures that we Facebook users are will likely hate the new setting, at least at first. But robots are going to love it. As the largest social network on the web, with an incredible amount of time spent on the site by its users, Facebook holds a giant reservoir of demographic and sentiment data. It is the motherlode – and it’s been inaccessible so far because everything has been private so far.This winter there was a lot of discussion of a rumored “Facebook Sentiment Engine” believed to be in the works. We wrote about what could be both best case and worst case scenarios for the opening of Facebook user data to outside analysis.Best CaseThink of the non-commercial, public interest kind of data that could be acquired. When the economic stimulus plan of 2009 was first announced on national television – what was the reaction of people in their mid twenties who lived in the Mid West of the US? Was that collective reaction substantially different from the reaction of self-identified queer people of color living in the North East US? How did the public reaction to the proposed plan change one hour, one day or one week after the announcement? This is all very interesting and potentially valuable data that could be, for the first time in history, available in near real time. Just by listening to what people are talking about in status updates and comments.Worst CaseThe worst case scenario is that Facebook will not open a free message search API for outside developers, instead it will make bulk access and analysis of all these public messages available only to commercial firms able to pay in order to harvest the data for marketing purposes. That seems pretty likely, unfortunately.It’s notable that there is not yet an option to search publicly shared content, as in full text search of messages, on the Facebook search page. It may not be searchable at all, except through very specific and possibly paid access granted by Facebook – even though it’s all visible to the human eye. As Fred Vogelstein wrote in a long post on Wired.com this week:By Facebook’s estimates, every month users share 4 billion pieces of information–news stories, status updates, birthday wishes, and so on. They also upload 850 million photos and 8 million videos. But anyone wanting to access that stuff must go through Facebook; the social network treats it all as proprietary data, largely shielding it from Google’s crawlers. Except for the mostly cursory information that users choose to make public, what happens on Facebook’s servers stays on Facebook’s servers. That represents a massive and fast-growing blind spot for Google, whose long-stated goal is to “organize the world’s information.”Comparisons to Twitter search are only useful in talking about theories of value, in terms of actual value an open Facebook search would leave tiny Twitter in the dust.So there are two ways this could go. Free programatic analysis to the publicly shared information from Facebook users could be like a high-speed, real-time Library of Congress for all the robots in the Republic. Or it could be limited access, like the high-priced market research reports bought and sold by marketing firms about other pools of public sentiment today.We know which scenario we’re cheering for.We also feel pretty sure how most Facebook users are going to feel about this fundamental change. They are going to hate it like most residents of the Wild West must have hated the first US Census agents.In time, though, people may very well decide they are comfortable with their social networking being public by default. That will be a different world, and today will have been one of the most important days in that new world’s unfolding. Tags:#Analysis#news#NYT#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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ON Semi: rapid installation of battery-free smart passive sensors for IoT applications

first_img Continue Reading Previous PragmaDev gives away ETSI SIP conformance test executablesNext Infineon: striving for autonomous driving development ON Semiconductor has announced a complete wireless battery free sensing solution kit (SPSDEVK1) that allows the company’s innovative Smart Passive Sensors to be rapidly integrated into Internet-of-Things applications. The SPSDEVK1 solution kit is plug and play ready for users to immediately measure, aggregate and analyze the data for various IoT applications.SPS wireless and battery-free sensors enable the monitoring of various parameters such as temperature, pressure, moisture or proximity at the network edge where running wires or replacing batteries may be impractical. When interrogated by an RF reader (the ON Semiconductor TagReader), the SPS “harvests” energy from the measuring signal, and then delivers a rapid and highly accurate reading from the sensor. This cost-effective solution has significant benefits over other technologies, and offers the potential to revolutionise low-power IoT sensing designs.The newly announced SPSDEVK1 is a complete sensing solution that includes a UHF SPS reader hub (SPSDEVR1-8), eight UHF antennas (SPS1DEVA1-W), 50 temperature sensors (SPS1T001PCB), a 12 V DC power supply, and an Ethernet cable. Also included is ON Semiconductor’s TagReader software, an application specifically developed for reading SPS that enables the full functionality of the tags, giving a comprehensive system solution.The TagReader software automatically detects the type of tag that is connected and reads sensor data graphically over time. A Graphical User Interface allows all system parameters related to the measurement process to be configured and re-configured as needed. As a result, with the SPSDEVK1, even first-time users can quickly and easily configure a system to measure, aggregate and analyse data for multiple fully wireless, battery-free IoT applications.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Tools & Software last_img read more

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23 days agoSouthampton midfielder Romeu happy for Lampard over Chelsea return

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Southampton midfielder Romeu happy for Lampard over Chelsea returnby Paul Vegas23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveSouthampton midfielder Oriol Romeu has backed former team-mate Frank Lampard to be a success at Chelsea.The pair played with each other at Stamford Bridge after Romeu joined the Blues from Barcelona in 2011.They will reunite again when Saints host Chelsea at St. Mary’s this Sunday.Speaking about Lampard, Romeu said: “He was such a good player and a good professional.”It’s good to see him doing that role there because he was a good leader and an amazing professional.”As a player, I don’t think there is much else to say because we all know what he did and how good he was.”Now, as a manager, I think he can also step in and do a great job.” last_img read more

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Video: Clemson Releases 360-Degree Tour Of New Football Complex

first_imgA view of Clemson's stadium at night from high up.CLEMSON, SC – SEPTEMBER 3: A general view of the game between the Texas A&M Aggies and the Clemson Tigers at Clemson Memorial Stadium on September 3, 2005 in Clemson, South Carolina. Clemson defeated Texas A&M 25-24. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)Back in February, Clemson announced that it would be building a new 140,000 square-foot football facility ahead of the 2017 season. Friday, the school officially broke ground on the project. Clemson also released a two-minute video to give fans a 360-degree view of what it’ll look like when it’s completed.The facility will include a number of ridiculous amenities, including a barber shop, an arcade, laser tag, a 24-seat HD theater, an indoor golf simulator, an indoor slide, and a replica of both The Hill and Howard’s Rock. You can read more here.Today we celebrate the groundbreaking of our new 140,000 square-foot facility! See more: https://t.co/NYsOf3Yj5x pic.twitter.com/P7JKgE4YhK— Clemson Football (@ClemsonFB) November 6, 2015WATCH || Take a virtual tour of the $55 million facility & hear from Coach Swinney, Thad Turnipseed & @ClemsonDRad: https://t.co/O4VwwfA35V— Clemson Football (@ClemsonFB) November 6, 2015It’s pretty obvious that Clemson is serious about keeping its football program elite. The new facility will certainly help with recruiting.last_img read more

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Ohio State womens ice hockey takes improved defense to St Cloud State

Then-freshman goaltender Kassidy Sauve (32) defends the net during a game against Mercyhurst on Nov. 11 at the OSU Ice Rink. OSU lost 3-0. Credit: Lantern File PhotoThe Ohio State women’s ice hockey team (5-7-0) recorded its first series split of season last weekend against the University of North Dakota. Now, the Buckeyes are preparing to head back on the road to St. Cloud, Minnesota, for a two-game series against St. Cloud State.Despite dropping three of its last four contests, the team believes it is playing with greater confidence than earlier in the season.“We’re definitely starting to find our identity a little more. We’ve been putting in a lot of work,” senior forward Kendall Curtis said. “We’re figuring out who we are as a team, and we know we can grind and come back from any deficit.”Against St. Cloud State (4-7-1), losers of two straight, the Buckeyes have a chance to put some distance between themselves and the teams behind them in the conference. The Huskies enter this weekend one point behind OSU for fifth place in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association standings.Internal improvementThe team’s mantra all season has been to focus on getting better each week independent of whom it plays. However, the Buckeyes recognize that this week is different, as they’re facing the team currently nipping at their heels.“We haven’t really talked much about St. Cloud, but we know that they have a similar record to us so this is an important weekend to get some points,” freshman forward Maddy Field said.For Field, who is tied for second on the team in goals scored, her contribution to the team improving has been to help shore up the team’s defense, which has allowed only eight goals in the last six games since allowing 18 goals in two games to Minnesota.“The coaches have definitely told me to be focusing on my defensive side and that the goals will come after,” Field said.OSU coach Jenny Potter, who will return to her home state of Minnesota for the first time as a Buckeye this weekend, said she is pleased with her squad’s development at this point of the season before an important series.“Our team has, in my opinion, improved every week,” Potter said. “Just getting better and better and learning every week from each other and the opponents we play.”Becoming a threatCurtis said she believes that the team’s overall improved play is attributed to a better grasp on its team concept.“Our systems are really coming more for us now, we’re not really focusing on it as much in practice,” Curtis said. “We’re focusing on coming together, taking that next step, not just systems, becoming a team that’s always a threat.”OSU’s renewed sense of confidence is aided by the time it spends working on its game, not the opponent’s.“I’m not too worried about other teams,” Potter said. “Obviously we’ve got to know their strengths and weaknesses, but more importantly you’ve got to know your strengths and play your game.”Their game looks to be continued stalwart defense and stiff competition as the Buckeyes continue to adjust under Potter in her first year as OSU’s coach.“It’s not good enough to be able to outwork teams anymore. We did a lot of that early this season,” Curtis said. “We were outworking teams, but the outcome wasn’t there and now we’re getting to the point where that’s not quite good enough.”Potter’s holistic approach to coaching will continue to guide the team as it continues to look to make noise against its remaining conference opponents.“We’re fortunate that we play in the best league in the country and never get to take an off-weekend,” Potter said.The Buckeyes are set to drop the puck against the Huskies at 4:07 p.m. on Friday and 2:37 p.m. on Saturday. read more

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