Spaniard fires warning to DeGale

first_imgSpaniard Jose Maria Guerrero has warned James DeGale to knock him out early or face a shock defeat.The pair will meet at the Liverpool Echo Arena on 9 December, when DeGale will defend his WBO Intercontintental super-middleweight title against the wily 34-year-old.DeGale’s European crown will not be on the line as the Harlesden man is expected to make a February defence of that title against mandatory challenger Cristian Sanavia, who is not yet ready to fight.And Guerrero insists DeGale is in for a rude awakening if he regards next month’s clash – which will be screened live on Box Nation (Sky channel 456) – as a warm-up bout.Promoter Frank Warren wants DeGale to fight for a world title next year.Guerrero declared: “I will give him some advice: destroy me quickly. If not, you will have a big problem.“If he thinks that this is the easiest fight of his career then he will have a big surprise.“This is the biggest opportunity of my career and I will make all the necessary arrangements for me to win and come back to Spain with the title.“I’m not accepting this opportunity for money. I’m accepting it because I will win and fight for the world title myself next year.”Guerrero has a record of 29-2-1, with one of his two losses coming against German Mario Veit, who once challenged Joe Calzaghe for the world title.“In my life I only know boxing so if I want a good future I can’t lose this fight. My options are win or win,” he added.“I think that this hunger is my strength. I need to win and I will win. I want to show the world who Jose Maria Guerrero is.”Related stories:Injury rules Groves out of Liverpool fightLet history decidelast_img read more

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Curiosity abounds after antibiotic resistant gene found on farm

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Research published in early December last year by Ohio State University animal scientists detailed the discovery of an antibiotic-resistant gene in a farrowing barn. Since its announcement, the industry has responded in various ways, ranging from curiosity to disappointment to calls for further testing.Thomas Wittum, Ph.D., is chair of the Department of Preventative Veterinary Medicine at Ohio State, in charge of the team behind the discovery of the antibiotic-resistant gene on the production pig farm, the location and ownership of which has not been released.“We have national surveillance in place looking for important antibiotic resistant organisms in farms. As part of that surveillance, we detected what’s known as a Carbapenem-resistant isolate on a pig farm here in the U.S. That’s a really important type of resistant bacteria because we usually only expect to find those organisms in human hospitals. So they’ve never been observed on farms before in the U.S. The fact that this was present on a farm was really surprising,” Wittum said.According to a press release from the American Society for Microbiology, “This combination of attributes, and the fact that carbapenem resistance was recently designated an urgent threat to public health by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention led the researchers to investigate whether bacteria with carbapenem resistance genes such as bla-imp-27 might be present in agricultural animals or in agricultural settings.”The discovery came after investigators collected environmental and fecal samples from the 1,500-sow farrow-to-finish farm over a window of four visits in five months. The resistant bacteria were found growing in agar plates as a result.A particularly surprising piece of the study came from the fact that no new livestock were introduced on the farm in the past 50 years, as they have been breeding their own stock in that time.Many producers are curious about how such a unique organism found its way to a hog operation.“We’re not really sure,” Wittum said. “We believe it got introduced. Probably by the movements of people or animals in some way, but we’re just not sure where it came from. It originally evolved in a human hospital or some other place and then introduced onto this farm.”The good news from the study — published in a journal of the American Society for Microbiology — was that no meat was contaminated nor humans infected with the bacteria. Wittum said there was no evidence that pigs carried the gene into the human food supply.The farm’s protocol was examined to get more information. Wittum said the operation in question was concerned about animal health, but professionals are working with them now to establish more secure practices.“Some of the things that we do on farms to treat sick piglets also can favor the spread of these resistant organisms. So sometimes we have to change our standard practices, maybe things like rotating antibiotics or other approaches veterinarians can help with, just to be sure that even though we may be treating appropriately, we may still be providing selection pressure that allows these organisms to spread,” he said. “They’ve been working with their veterinarian and we’ve been discussing with them some of their antibiotic use practices. That might’ve been helping to slow the spread of these resistant organisms.”The discovery comes as no mere accident, as Ohio State has been part of a nationwide effort to monitor resistance in agriculture. Wittum said the focus on that research has grown exponentially in recent years.“It’s a really important issue for a lot of reasons,” he said. “There’s definitely been more work looking at the relationship between resistance in animals and humans because we know that organisms that affect animals affect humans and vice versa. We can exchange those organisms whether they’re resistant or not. And so we need to understand how those organisms move between animal and human populations.”As with any research, certain questions remain unanswered, including a big one.“What we don’t know is how to control resistant organisms like this once they’re introduced into a farm,” Wittum said. “Because obviously the farmer doesn’t want it to be there and we don’t want to have a risk of it being introduced into the food supply. At this point we don’t know how to get rid of it so that’s one of the things we’d like to figure out.”What sort of management should producers be doing now to make sure this isn’t a problem down the road on their own farms?“Well obviously biosecurity is really important in farms in general, but swine producers in particular really have high levels of biosecurity,” Wittum said. “But that’s really important — to maintain that strong biosecurity to help prevent the introduction of pathogens or resistant organisms like this. They also need to work closely with their veterinarian to be sure they’re applying antibiotics in the right way and using the right approaches to be sure that we’re not providing selection pressure that favors the spread of these highly resistant organisms. Those are some of the things that farmers should pay attention to.”Resulting from the discovery has been notable feedback from industry and consumer groups.“Producers and farm organizations are concerned because of food safety concerns, but also because these resistant organisms are animal health concerns as well. If you have animals that are sick with these resistant organisms, then they may not be able to be treated with some important antibiotics,” Wittum said. “So definitely producers and veterinarians are very concerned about this.”One high ranking veterinarian in particular pointed out that the development is the most recent in a time of vast antibiotic discussion in recent years, from both the producer and consumer perspectives.“I’m chairman of the National Institute of Animal Agriculture for the next two years and we’ve had for the last six years the antibiotic symposium, involving the human medical field as well as the veterinary field and industry,” said Tony Forshey, State Veterinarian. He knows firsthand the importance of antibiotic effectiveness.“We’ve been talking about how these bugs become antibiotic resistant and how they exchange DNA and genetics, and some of these bugs have never seen antibiotics before yet they carry that resistant gene,” Forshey said. “It’s survival of the fittest and they’re doing pretty well at that. We’ve got to come up with alternative ways other than antibiotics to manage disease. Those are some of the things we’re discussing.”Forshey also said improvements are needed when talking about antibiotics with the public.“Well I think we can. We don’t need to use fear tactics. Food safety is number one in this country in what we’re doing, and all of our meats and milks and other things are going into the marketplace and the food chain don’t have antibiotics in them. We talk about antibiotic-free and some of these things when really, that stuff has always been that way,” Forshey said. “We need to just approach it and get everybody involved and interact. We need to collaboratively talk about how these bacteria develop antibiotic resistance and how to get those genes through DNA exchange between the bacteria themselves. There’s a lot of reasons for this and there’s nobody really to blame. We just have to come up with alternatives.”As the leader of animal health in Ohio, Forshey had some words of wisdom going forward.“It’s a great time to be in the business of agriculture,” he said. “I’ve always been involved with ag, growing up on the farm. We take food safety very seriously. We take disease issues very seriously. So I think we’re doing a better job with the technology we have today in producing a better product everyday.”last_img read more

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It’s a long wait until Aug. 12

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jon Scheve, Superior Feed Ingredients, LLCThere is a lot of uncertainty in the market right now. There are many reasons to be bullish and bearish. Below are some of the issues I see that could really impact the markets over the coming weeks and months. Strong disagreement of the June USDA report continuesIt’s been a month since the June USDA acreage report and many still say the corn acre estimates are inaccurate, while few seem concerned that bean acres estimates were lower than expected.The June corn estimate was only 1 million to 2 million acres below the March intentions report. After the prolonged and widespread planting issues and flooding, it’s easy to see why many disagree with the June report. However, after digging into the numbers in late June, I expressed my concern that the USDA may have been on to something that many market participants missed.For the last 3 years, total corn and bean planted acres have been around 179 million. The June USDA report estimated 172 million, so maybe 7 million prevent plant acres are already being considered. So, with recent discussions suggesting prevent plant acres could be around 8 million for corn and 2 million to 3 million for beans, the USDA may be closer than the many in the market had estimated. How could the June planted acres estimate be so close to March predictions?I’ve been getting this question a lot. I think when corn prices approached $4.40 in late May, farmers pushed hard to get their corn planted to take advantage of the increased prices. Especially since beans were still at $9, an unprofitable price for most farmers. So, farmers may have been on track to plant 97 million corn acres, and if the 8 million prevent plant corn acres is close, the USDA June report may be more accurate than many expect.However, if the June USDA results were inaccurate and substantially less acres were planted, I expect a very quick and large rally after the Aug. 12 report. Weather will be a big focus after the August reportAfter the Aug. 12 report has been released, the market will start placing bets on the late-planted corn yield and September weather. An early frost could have a huge impact on the market. One weather forecaster is showing the frost threat is a 50/50 shot right now. Normally frost is not that big of a concern to the market and we haven’t really had to trade that type of threat in the last 10 years.The two-week weather forecasts don’t look very threatening to most of the Corn Belt concerning heat and precipitation, but September weather will matter more than usual this year. Labor Day may be the equivalent of July 4th in a normal marketing year. If 2-week forecasts after the holiday weekend look cool, there may be upside potential in the market. A warm 2-week forecast may mean prices are topped out until harvest yields start to roll in. More than 50% of this crop planted well after Memorial Day, and usually late planting means lower yields. Why did the market drop this week?One of many reasons given was that because the Federal Reserve cut interest rates because they perceive inflation is under control. This likely caused some funds who were using the commodities as a hedge against inflation to exit those positions and take the board lower.Another potential reason was that collectively funds seem to think planted acres will be high, weather conditions are good and frost is unlikely. Also, corn technical charts are not currently bullish, so funds likely were exiting their long positions. Historically, the market often moves excessively in either direction when there is widespread uncertainty, but it’s difficult to see that when you’re in the middle of the market swings. Maybe the market went too low and a rebound is around the corner. Maybe not. What about the trade war and exports to China?The President threatened to increase tariffs on China last week trying to get them to negotiate. The market did not like the optics of that tweet and sold off. It seems unlikely the trade war will be resolved before the election next fall.African Swine Fever looks to have reduced China’s hog herd by around 40%. This could be a long-term problem for corn and bean demand, unless China can find a replacement protein source that will consume the corn and beans. What about basis?Basis levels dropped 5 to 15 cents throughout most of the Corn Belt last week. However, basis prices are still better than over a month ago. There is still a lot of old crop corn stored away, especially in the western Corn Belt where there were much fewer planting issues. Farmers there may start clearing out bins to prepare for harvest, and this movement could suppress basis through harvest. Obviously, an early freeze could change that, but that won’t be known until harvest is nearly upon us.It will be a long wait for everyone until Aug. 12. Please email [email protected] with any questions or to learn more. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results.last_img read more

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Five Things That Prevent You from Succeeding at Prospecting

first_imgSelling activities fall into two categories. The first is opportunity creation, the second, opportunity capture. The first necessarily precedes the second. If your sales results are not what you want them to be, look first to opportunity creation and prospecting. If you are not getting the results you want, here are a few things that might be missing.No Talk Tracks: I love scripts. I call them planned dialogues. You might call them talk tracks. In a complex, dynamic human interaction, there are countless variables. But it is possible to count the different responses you are likely to encounter when you interrupt someone and ask them for their time. The expectation that one talk track will work for all scenarios is just not true. You have to vary your approach and change things up. You do need talk tracks, and you do need chops.No Courage to Ask Again: When you interrupt someone to ask them for an appointment, many people will decline your request. They are trying to protect their time, and they are trying not to waste it on things that aren’t important to them now. This is reflexive, and you must ask again, increasing the value you are offering to trade for their time.No Campaigns: You call your dream client in January. You have a lot of targets, so you call them again in April. Then July, then October. This isn’t prospecting. It isn’t strategic enough, there isn’t enough activity, and it isn’t creating value for your target client. It’s sporadic, and it is not serious. If you don’t have more touches, and more interactions closer together, what you are doing can no longer be called prospecting.No Call Blocks: If there is not time blocked on your calendar, then you are not going to produce the prospecting results you need. For a salesperson, call block protects the time you need from the outside distractions that, while needing your attention, prevent you from building a pipeline. Prospecting time is sacred time, and you need to carve enough of it to generate the opportunities you need.Too Little Activity: You may not like that the fact that you can’t generate the opportunities you need with the amount of activity you prefer to spend prospecting, but that does not change the reality that if what you are doing isn’t working, you need to change something. You can have all of the four points above, but it you dial two numbers a day, none of it will amount to anything. Greater activity cures activity problems. Greater effectiveness cures effectiveness problems. Know which is preventing your success. Treat opportunity creation as if it is equally important as opportunity capture. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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Ohio State womens ice hockey takes improved defense to St Cloud State

Then-freshman goaltender Kassidy Sauve (32) defends the net during a game against Mercyhurst on Nov. 11 at the OSU Ice Rink. OSU lost 3-0. Credit: Lantern File PhotoThe Ohio State women’s ice hockey team (5-7-0) recorded its first series split of season last weekend against the University of North Dakota. Now, the Buckeyes are preparing to head back on the road to St. Cloud, Minnesota, for a two-game series against St. Cloud State.Despite dropping three of its last four contests, the team believes it is playing with greater confidence than earlier in the season.“We’re definitely starting to find our identity a little more. We’ve been putting in a lot of work,” senior forward Kendall Curtis said. “We’re figuring out who we are as a team, and we know we can grind and come back from any deficit.”Against St. Cloud State (4-7-1), losers of two straight, the Buckeyes have a chance to put some distance between themselves and the teams behind them in the conference. The Huskies enter this weekend one point behind OSU for fifth place in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association standings.Internal improvementThe team’s mantra all season has been to focus on getting better each week independent of whom it plays. However, the Buckeyes recognize that this week is different, as they’re facing the team currently nipping at their heels.“We haven’t really talked much about St. Cloud, but we know that they have a similar record to us so this is an important weekend to get some points,” freshman forward Maddy Field said.For Field, who is tied for second on the team in goals scored, her contribution to the team improving has been to help shore up the team’s defense, which has allowed only eight goals in the last six games since allowing 18 goals in two games to Minnesota.“The coaches have definitely told me to be focusing on my defensive side and that the goals will come after,” Field said.OSU coach Jenny Potter, who will return to her home state of Minnesota for the first time as a Buckeye this weekend, said she is pleased with her squad’s development at this point of the season before an important series.“Our team has, in my opinion, improved every week,” Potter said. “Just getting better and better and learning every week from each other and the opponents we play.”Becoming a threatCurtis said she believes that the team’s overall improved play is attributed to a better grasp on its team concept.“Our systems are really coming more for us now, we’re not really focusing on it as much in practice,” Curtis said. “We’re focusing on coming together, taking that next step, not just systems, becoming a team that’s always a threat.”OSU’s renewed sense of confidence is aided by the time it spends working on its game, not the opponent’s.“I’m not too worried about other teams,” Potter said. “Obviously we’ve got to know their strengths and weaknesses, but more importantly you’ve got to know your strengths and play your game.”Their game looks to be continued stalwart defense and stiff competition as the Buckeyes continue to adjust under Potter in her first year as OSU’s coach.“It’s not good enough to be able to outwork teams anymore. We did a lot of that early this season,” Curtis said. “We were outworking teams, but the outcome wasn’t there and now we’re getting to the point where that’s not quite good enough.”Potter’s holistic approach to coaching will continue to guide the team as it continues to look to make noise against its remaining conference opponents.“We’re fortunate that we play in the best league in the country and never get to take an off-weekend,” Potter said.The Buckeyes are set to drop the puck against the Huskies at 4:07 p.m. on Friday and 2:37 p.m. on Saturday. read more

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Mourinho and the team are united Man Utd vicechairman

first_imgFor Ed Woodward, the English Premier League giants are united and working together to get the best results possible in all competitionsManchester United executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward has insisted that there’s no division at the club.There have been many rumors about how Jose Mourinho has had problems with the different Red Devils footballers.But for Woodward, the club is really united.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“On the pitch, we remain well positioned in the Champions League, and although we’ve had a mixed start to our domestic campaign, the squad and manager are fully united in their determination to regain our momentum in the Premier League,” he told Sky Sports.“Over the summer we had a good pre-season tour to the US and while we couldn’t have all of the first-team squad with us, due to many of our players advancing deep into the knockout stage of the World Cup, it provided a good opportunity for many of our emerging prospects to experience being part of the first-team set-up.”“We’re looking forward to a number of them making the successful transition to the first-team, like many before them, including Jesse Lingard, Marcus Rashford, Scott McTominay and Andreas Pereira of the current squad,” he added.“Our financial strength enables us to continue to attract and retain top players and to invest in our academy, as we look to drive the success on the pitch that the club and our fans expect,” Woodward said.”last_img read more

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1st Commercial Launch Scheduled For Alaska Aerospace Complex

first_imgWhile government launches will continue at the spaceport — a Department of Defense missile launch is planned for later this year — commercial spaceflight will factor prominently in the company’s future, Campbell said. Alaska Aerospace has launched 19 rockets in collaboration with government agencies including NASA, the U.S. Air Force and the Missile Defense Agency since the spaceport opened in 1998. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享KODIAK, Alaska (AP) — The Pacific Spaceport Complex in Kodiak will be launching its first commercial spaceflight next month, Alaska Aerospace CEO Craig Campbell said. Sources with knowledge of the industry have refused to name the company that will launch in April due to a non-disclosure agreement, the Daily Mirror reported. But the launch will not be from Vector Space Systems or Rocket Lab — two companies that have known contracts with Alaska Aerospace. “The market is primed for satellites that need to launch from places with high latitudes like us,” Campbell said. “That’s why we’re working right now with four different launch companies in that market.” The Kodiak spaceport’s polar location is particularly beneficial for satellites meant for imaging and navigation. Satellites in polar orbits travel at lower altitudes and have relatively short orbital periods, allowing information to be relayed quickly, according to Germany’s national research center for earth sciences. In preparation for the launch, berms are in place to protect the launch pad and surrounding facilities. A glass structure has been placed on top of a shipping container, which will serve as a mission control center. But in recent years, the publicly owned corporation has partnered with commercial launch companies amid the growth of the private spaceflight industry. Vector aims to utilize these advantages. Later this year, the company will be launching two PocketQube satellites, according to a March 8 press release. PocketQubes are 5 centimeters squared — about the size of an apple. The Coast Guard has notified mariners of the launch, which is scheduled for some time between April 6-13, the Kodiak Daily Mirror reported Monday. “In the next two to three years, I see expanding opportunities for commercial launches in Alaska,” he said.last_img read more

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