Donnelly defends seat against Republican challenger

first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the final installment in a two-part series featuring two candidates vying to represent Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District. U.S. Rep. Joe Donnelly said the economy and employment are among the most important issues in the race for the congressional seat in Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District. The Nov. 2 election, in which Republican Jackie Walorski is challenging Donnelly, is one of several crucial races across the country that will determine the political balance in Congress. Donnelly, who has held the congressional seat since 2006, told The Observer he is pleased with the progress of his 2010 campaign due to its focus on economic and employment issues. “I have tried to talk about the issues in our district, the primary issue being jobs, how we create more jobs, and how we bring more jobs to our region, and how we make the American economy stronger,” he said. “The campaign has gone well because we have been able to focus on the issues that are important.” Donnelly is a 1977 Notre Dame graduate and 1981 Notre Dame law school graduate. He said his college education gave him a strong sense of values and influenced his congressional duties. “When you leave Notre Dame, Notre Dame gives you the values you need to try a do a good job,” he said. “You have the motto of ‘God, Country, Notre Dame.’ That is the cornerstone of what we try to do in Congress, what is best for the country.” Donnelly said not only has the University been an important influence on his political duties, but Notre Dame represents a political partner of sorts, both now and for the future. “I’ve been blessed with the number of Notre Dame students who work in my office. We have had a number of interns throughout the year who have worked in our office in Washington,” he said. “My wife also works at Notre Dame, so the University is a huge part of our lives and I am extraordinarily proud to be a graduate of the school.” Donnelly said the issue of employment is critical for college students, and young college graduates in Indiana’s 2nd Congressional District are an important part of the workforce. “We have seen the unemployment rate drop throughout our congressional district, so college students who want to stay in our area from Notre Dame and go out into the job market, more opportunities are available to them,” he said. Donnelly, who is a member of the moderate congressional Democratic group named the Blue Dog Coalition, said his moderate political stance influences his economic decisions. “I think our moderate policies are what is going to get us back to a balanced budget, which is critical to our college students,” he said. On the topic of health care, Donnelly said one of the most popular aspects of the bill across party lines was the possibility for dependents to be carried on their parents’ program until age 26. “I think it’s a big help,” he said. Donnelly said his pro-life stance was important during the health care reform debate in Congress. “We wanted to make sure the bill was not only pro-life in its funding sources, but it’s also pro-life in the way that it treats expecting mothers in the medical area,” he said. Donnelly also takes a strong stance on responsible energy independence. He said the U.S. could drill offshore in an environmentally conscious manner that is both safe and responsible. He cited the recent BP oil spill disaster as an example of a company cutting corners, something he said the U.S. government must curb. “Part of our job in Congress and in the country is to make sure the rules are followed,” he said. “If we do this we can have a very strong energy policy and a very environmentally friendly energy policy.” Donnelly said education would continue to be of political importance if he is reelected, as his district is influential in that level of learning. “Our district is blessed with Notre Dame and so many other college institutions,” he said. “I’m a strong supporter of increasing Pell Grants and a strong supporter of decreasing student interest on loans. A big part of my work is making college more affordable for our families.” Despite the country being in the midst of a troop surge in Afghanistan, Donnelly said he is looking to increased steadiness in the region. The presence of American troops in the Afghanistan could change in the coming months, he said. “We are hopeful that this time next year there will be significant stability in Afghanistan and troops will actually be coming home,” Donnelly said. Donnelly said the combination of his economic and foreign policies represents the correct political approach the country should be taking towards solving the issues that are being addressed in this election. “I think that the Blue Dog message of fiscal conservatism, strong national defense and strong support for not only American families, but also American small businesses is the right message at this time,” he said.last_img read more

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ND hosts language contest

first_imgParticipants showcased weeks of preparation Friday during the Chinese Program’s Sixth Annual Chinese Speech Contest, which featured elaborate skits, dialogues and monologues. Students from all five Chinese language levels participated in the contest, which took place in the auditorium of the Hesburgh Center. The judges, which including faculty from Notre Dame and other schools, evaluated the performances and distributed awards for each grade level. “Our primary goal in organizing this event is to promote the study of Chinese at Notre Dame and to foster a sense of community among our language students,” Chinese associate teaching professor Chengxu Yin said. “We believe the speech contest provides an excellent opportunity for students to get to know each better and for students at lower levels to witness what they can achieve at higher levels.” The performances progressed from the beginner level to more advanced levels. The skits and dialogues were presented in Chinese and accompanied by PowerPoint slides that provided the English translations. “Everyone there enjoyed every moment and every performance,” Chinese language visiting assistant professor Yanjing Wang said. Sophomore Audrey McMurtrie and freshman Camilla Mampieri  performed a spoof of the popular “ND Confessions” Facebook page. The pair collected “confessions” from a number of Chinese students through Facebook, translated them and then turned them into a skit. Dominic Romeo, a fifth-year Chinese student, and George Liu, a fourth-year Chinese student, debated whether or not Taiwan is an independent country. Liu argued against independence, and Romeo argued for the recognition of the country. Romeo said the issue is a very controversial debate being discussed frequently in Chinese and Taiwanese politics. Contestants were nominated by classmates and approved by professors, entirely based off of their performance in classes. After a student committed to participate in the contest, professors worked with them to correct their scripts and to help them practice their speaking skills. Chinese professors also prepared songs in Chinese for the event. They took popular Chinese songs, wrote new lyrics and created a video featuring pictures from classes, Chinese events and the previous year’s contest. The lyrics expressed the students’ dedication to studying the language, support for the Chinese Program and love for the University. Students of all grade levels joined to sing the two songs at the conclusion of the contest. “That moment, perhaps more than any other during the year, captured the essence of the passion and enthusiasm that truly distinguishes Notre Dame’s Chinese department,” Romeo said. Romeo said this year’s speech contest was a major success. “Students from all levels demonstrated the growth of their language skills that has taken place over the course of the last year,” Romeo said. “A wide range of exciting and entertaining topics were covered, keeping students, teachers, and other members of the crowd highly engaged.” Although measures can be taken to improve attendance of the event, Yin said this year’s event showed huge promise for coming years. “This year we had the largest attendance ever,” Yin said “The Hesburgh auditorium was packed beyond capacity, with many students having to sit on the floor … I am very proud of what the Chinese Program has done to promote Chinese studies at Notre Dame.”last_img read more

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Students share experiences with mental illness

first_imgChris Collins | The Observer Sophomore Brendan Coughlan discusses the devastating consequences of mental illness and possible solutions to alleviate the stigma surrounding it at “In Our Own Words” for Mental Illness Awareness Week.Senior Desiree San Martin said her depression and anxiety has made typical student life difficult.“I tried to fit in and be the normal Notre Dame student. I’m involved in extracurriculars, I have a work-study job, I got myself an internship. But my illness kept getting the best of me,” she said. “On the outside, it seemed that I was just plain lazy. My inability to get out of bed some days was seen as being lazy and wanting to sleep.”San Martin said the Notre Dame community reached out and supported her in her struggles with her illness. “Multiple professors contacted my rector after I hadn’t been to their classes in three weeks, and all my professors contacted my adviser to express concern. They had all also contacted me, asking what was wrong and where I had been,” she said. “At a larger school, students fall by the wayside all the time.”San Martin said she has made it a point this year to take advantage of all of the University’s resources in dealing with her mental illness. “In previous years, I would avoid the Counseling Center because of the stigma behind counseling,” she said. Sophomore Ally Zimmer, spiritual coordinator for NAMI-ND, said therapy significantly helped her deal with depression after graduating from high school. “Although it took several weeks before I started seeing improvement, my therapist was great and really helped me sort through my issues. She wasn’t afraid to give me the messages that I needed to hear,” she said. “After about a month and a half of weekly appointments, I finally started to smile again.” Zimmer said she experienced a second episode of depression after her first semester at Notre Dame but was able to return to campus after winter break and get counseling. “Slowly but surely, I once again crawled out from the hole that is mental illness,” she said. “Now I’m healthy, my self-worth is where is should be, and I am as much as a goofball as I ever was.”Although mental illness is often treated as the “elephant in the room,” Zimmer said, taking ownership of her depression has been important to her. “That elephant doesn’t have to be hidden, and it doesn’t have to be an elephant at all,” she said. Tags: Mental Illness Awareness Week, NAMI Editor’s Note: This is the third installment of a five-day series discussing mental health at Notre Dame in recognition of Mental Illness Awareness Week.Ten students shared stories of the impact mental illness has had on their lives Tuesday night in the LaFortune Student Center Ballroom. “In Our Own Words” was part of the programming for Mental Illness Awareness Week 2015, sponsored by the Notre Dame chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI-ND). Chris Collins | The Observer Sophomore Neil Lewis speaks at “In Our Own Words” in the LaFortune Student Center Ballroom as part of Mental Health Awareness Week.Senior Haley Hoyle reflected on her brother’s struggle with depression and his suicide in May. “My brother never graduated. He never got his degree. He never even came close to living a joyful life. He never got a good job; he was never able to follow his passion for playing guitar. He never got married, never had kids,” she said. “There was a lot my brother was never able to do, and above all, the thing he was not able to do was live past the age of 23.” Living with mental illness is become increasingly difficult, Hoyle said, because of the seeming lack of physical symptoms“The stigma associated with mental illness is absolutely disgusting to me. When my brother was still alive, many people were afraid to go near him — they just thought he was crazy,” she said. “Mental illness is a mystery, it is invisible, it is hidden from view, and it is only apparent to those who really have eyes to see.“So here is my plea to you: Have eyes to see the pain of the mentally ill and work with me to fight the stigma. Let’s work tirelessly together to fight the stigma surrounding mental illness, anxiety, depression and anything else that may lead to suicide. Let’s work together to prevent any more brothers, sisters, parents, aunts, uncles or friends from taking their own lives. Let’s work together so that each person will plan to be here tomorrow, and each person will always believe that there is still hope.” last_img read more

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Student Senate discusses student dining, poses suggestions

first_imgStudent Senate met Wednesday evening for a question-and-answer session with Scott Kachmarik, director of student dining and residences, as well as to approve both the Sophomore and Junior Class Council elections and declare winning tickets.Appointed to his position in January, Kachmarik introduced upcoming initiatives on staff recruitment and cited catering to student needs about food sourcing, meal plan structures and popular menu items as his main priorities.Kachmarik also highlighted the importance of student feedback to his role.“I’ve been spending a lot of time in the dining halls working with the staff. … I want to make sure I’m spending a lot of time there, figuring out ways to have you approach me, stop me, give me suggestions,” Kachmarik said. “There’s three questions I’ve been asking: What are the things that we currently do that we need to keep doing? … What things we do that we need to improve on? … What do we have to stop doing? Clearly as we look at the data, it tells us strawberries are popular. There are some things that we are trying to work on and bring into the menus more consistently.”Walsh Hall sophomore Senator Sarah Kim addressed the idea of restructuring meal plans and adjusting the balance between Flex Points and meal swipes.“I just wanted more options. … A lot of people can’t grab lunch in between classes,” Kim said.Kachmarik emphasized his commitment to working with students to implement initiatives that benefitted them.“We want to make sure we find that balance between hectic lifestyles and the ability to slow down and connect with each other,” Kachmarik said.Howard Hall sophomore Senator Amy Smikle brought up the popularity of burger and fajita nights, and the possibility of including meat in the dining halls for non-religious students on Fridays during the observance of Lent.Welsh Family sophomore Senator Kathleen Flavin expressed hope for better grab-and-go options. However, Kachmarik encouraged students to eat in the dining halls.“The … intention of Flex Points and grab-and-go is to serve as a complement to the meal plan, not to replace the meal plan,” Kachmarik said. “… Our main goal and our main intentions are for students to eat in the dining hall. Grab-and-go and Flex Points are a way to acknowledge busy lifestyles.”Due to the event of both the Sophomore and Junior Class Council elections having only one ticket, the Student Senate approved a motion to suspend both elections and declare winners. The incoming Sophomore Class Council will have Michael Conlon as president, Mary Ninneman as vice president, Christopher Lembo as treasurer and Jane Driano as secretary. The ticket had previously served in the same positions together on Freshman Class Council this year.Sara Dugan will serve as president of the incoming Junior Class Council with Janet Stengle serving as vice-president, Paul Stevenson as treasurer and Matthew Peters as secretary.To conclude the meeting, sophomore Becca Blais was re-nominated and approved as Director of Internal Affairs. She will serve until the turnover of the Student Union on April 1. Tags: dining hall reform, junior class council, sophomore class council, student senatelast_img read more

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Student body presidential candidates make final campaign pitches in runoff debate

first_imgThe remaining student body presidential candidates and their respective running mates made their final campaign pitches to the public Thursday in a Judicial Council runoff debate in the Duncan Student Center.The debate was held a day before Friday’s runoff election, which will determine the 2018-2019 student body president and vice president. The contenders, juniors Alex Kruszewski, with running mate Julia Dunbar, and juniors Gates McGavick, with running mate Corey Gayheart, discussed topics such as mental health, sexual assault, dorm inequality, campus unity and the feasibility of their ideas. Chris Collins | The Observer Alex Kruszewski and Julia Dunbar, left, and Gates McGavick and Corey Gayheart participate in the student government runoff debate Thursday night in the Duncan Student Center before Friday’s election.Dunbar said student life is only one of the pillars of the Kruszewski-Dunbar platform and that the ticket was shifting away from “surface-level stuff.”“We got to sit back to re-brand ourselves a little bit [this past week],” Kruszewski added. “The ideas are the same and they have been there all along in the plans that we have had on our website, but we decided that we wanted to restructure [our platform].”According to the Kruszewski-Dunbar website, the ticket re-focused itself around “five passions” — well-being, sexual assault prevention and student safety, student life, diversity and inclusion and sustainability — rather than just student life.McGavick said he and Gayheart have stayed with their platform’s pillars and that student life and other critically important issues are not “mutually exclusive.”“Students know what’s best for them and that’s why we’re in this,” Gayheart said. “We want student government to be a voice for all students no matter what.”To improve mental health resources on campus, Gayheart said the ticket is focusing on making University Health Services (UHS) and the University Counseling Center more “proactive instead of reactive” through methods such as increasing UHS booths at campus events.Meanwhile, Dunbar said campus resources are being underutilized, and there must be increased awareness and accessibility to them.“A lot of students don’t know about these resources because they are structural impediments to the UHS being able to reach out to students, to McWell being able to reach out to students,” she said.When asked about the achievability of “lofty campaign goals,” Kruszewski said asking more of student government and addressing big questions that may not seem feasible is the first step.“We can’t just focus on being transparent, we can’t just focus on being approachable,” he said. “Feasibility comes starting with asking the question of administrators and asking the difficult questions … and working collaboratively with the administration.”Repealing the University Housing policy and improving dorm maintenance shouldn’t be lofty goals, McGavick said, as there is common consensus among students regarding these issues.“A way to make a lot of these bigger goals more feasible is seeing clear, tangible progress from student government in getting the little things right,” McGavick said. “ … Once we have a better connection between the campus and student government, then we can really get to amplify student voices on each issue.”Both tickets agreed there are inequalities between male and women’s residence halls. McGavick said there should be a more equitable application of the rule and increased awareness of parietals amnesty.“Sometimes things are exercised way more strictly in women’s halls than they are in men’s halls and that’s a discrepancy,” he said. “That is a problem because it sends the wrong message about the way that we’re training our hall staffs.”Reforming hall staff training is a great place to start, Dunbar said, but concerns should be raised regarding dorm structural obstacles as well.“When they’re building new dorms, they think that girls want kitchens instead of more gym space,” Dunbar said. “Maybe, but I don’t know who came up with that … they’re playing off these stereotypes that don’t really fit the mold of the average Notre Dame student.”Kruszewski said there needs to be structural answers regarding sexual assault as well, and programs such as GreeNDot awareness, Callisto and Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) classes need to be improved. Gayheart said he wants to expand GreeNDot, parietals amnesty and the Title IX campaign.“ … Notre Dame should be an active leader in the national discourse on Title IX and we will make sure that we do that,” Gayheart said.Regarding campus unity, Gayheart said though a lot of people don’t want to talk in the political environment, he and McGavick are prepared to do so as McGavick is more conservative and Gayheart is more liberal. In response, Kruszewski said the first step to promoting campus unity is stepping away and not recognizing politics.“[Gayheart] makes a really interesting point that political differences shouldn’t matter and that’s why Julia and I haven’t told you what our political orientations are,” Kruszewski said. “We also want to listen … the difference is that we want to listen to these ideas on campus and take them into account which is why we had a moving platform since day one … we will stand for issues universally agreed upon.”In their closing statements, Dunbar said the passions she and Kruszewski will focus on get to the core of “what hurts” in a student’s life.“[Improvements in student life] are things that we definitely want, but it’s one of [our platform’s] 15 departments,” Kruszewski said. “… if you care about other passions in life, if you care more about sexual assault and how that can impact the daily life of a student, potentially even more than paying a couple of extra dollars for a sandwich, we’re the candidates for you.”Gayheart said leaders must be willing to take a stance, even when it is not popular.“The definition of a true leader is someone who stands up when others aren’t willing to stand with them,” Gayheart said. “ … Student government should be a leader on this campus and it shouldn’t be blowing whichever way the winds are blowing. It should be standing up for all students.”There is a difference between evolving on issues and totally shifting from them, McGavick said in his final statement, and consistency is what he and Gayheart will project if elected.“We really want to emphasize that we’re trying to bring a wide campus perspective into student government and that’s what’s been missing over the past couple of years,” he said.Tags: Judicial Council, Kruszewski-Dunbar, McGavick-Gayheart, runoff debate, runoff electionlast_img read more

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Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s host Digital Humanities Research Institute

first_imgNotre Dame and Saint Mary’s will be hosting their first Digital Humanities Research Institute from May 14 to 17 funded by a grant through Indiana Humanities.Saint Mary’s Medieval English literature and manuscript studies professor Sarah Noonan along with Dan Johnson, the Digital Scholarship librarian at Notre Dame, were two of 16 participants, out of over 130 applicants, who received a fellowship to attend the Digital Humanities Research Institute workshop at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York.“It just so happened that we were both chosen from this area,” Noonan said. “We laughed that we had to go to New York to meet each other because we hadn’t met each other before. Dan and I decided that because we both were going through this program and had to implement what we learned, we decided to work on it together because that would make it more fun and interesting.”A key requirement of the program was that the participants create a digital humanities institute at their respective home institutions.“Much of the curriculum, that I’ll be using in the digital humanities research institute here was developed at CUNY and flexibly adapted to our own community and the needs that I think need to be addressed here,” she said. “One of the goals of this program was to expand communities of practice, so they wanted us to kind of gain training in these tools so that we could then take them home, use them and teach them to members of our institutions in our regions.”Due to the grant from Indiana Humanities, the program will be free for participants, including room and board.“We’re very excited that Indiana Humanities is supporting this program and it will allow us to bring in some graduate students from Loyola University to help us teach sections of the workshop and to also provide some general text support, during the event itself,” she said. “It’s going to be open to undergraduate students at Saint Mary’s, graduate students at Notre Dame, faculty and staff from both institutions and then graduate students as well as faculty and staff from institutions in the surrounding areas.”Noonan said there will be an application process of which they will be accepting 18 to 22 participants and, because it is a paired initiative between Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame, the first two days of the institute will be held at Saint Mary’s and the second two days will be held at Notre Dame.“Digital humanities research tends to be more collaborative at its core because you have to bring a lot more perspectives and skill sets to those kinds of projects,” Noonan said. “One of the main goals is not only to provide training to these individuals but to also establish networks between individuals who are working on similar projects. It is crucial to the future of the humanities that we grabble with this change and what it means for who we are, how we read and how we understand the world around us.”Tags: Digital humanities, Digital Humanities Research Institute, Indiana Humanitieslast_img read more

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Tim Horton’s Cookie Sale To Benefit UPMC Chautauqua Maternity Ward

first_imgWNY News Now Image.JAMESTOWN — In what has been an annual tradition since 1996, local Tim Hortons restaurants will be selling smile cookies with proceeds benefiting the UPMC Maternity Ward.Starting Monday, Sept. 14 and running through Sunday, Sept. 20, Tim Hortons restaurants will raise money for UPMC Chautauqua’s Maternity Department.As part of its annual Smile Cookie fundraiser, Tim Hortons will be selling chocolate chunk Smile Cookies decorated with blue eyes and a pink smile for $1 (plus tax), with the full $1 amount going to help local communities of each restaurant. Last year, the campaign raised more than $7.8 million.“We are very honored the Tim Horton’s local ownership chose us as their recipient for this program,” said Megan Barone, Director of Development. “They wanted to make an impact in technological advances for our maternity department, specifically our newborns. We were looking to upgrade our vital signs monitors that interface with medical records. This makes it more of a streamline process and aligns with our mission of ensuring state of the art technology and offering advances in healthcare for our patients. We are very excited this will happen sooner than later with their fundraising efforts.” “Tim Hortons is a brand that has been built up town by town and city by city over the last 55 years and this is one of many initiatives that allow us to give back to the communities in which we live and work. Our guests, and our team members feel incredibly proud knowing that the money raised during the campaign directly supports local causes that will impact so many,” Blake Tarana, owner stated. “We are very proud we will be able to donate $25,000 to support our local community hospital’s maternity unit.”“We are truly grateful that Tim Horton’s and the Tarana family have chosen UPMC Chautauqua as a partner for this year’s campaign.  They have a long proud history of giving back to our community.” stated Cecil Miller, VP of Operations at UPMC Chautauqua.To support UPMC Chautauqua’s Maternity Department directly, visit WCAFoundationJamestown.org, or contact Megan Barone, director of development at [email protected] Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Every Public School In New York To Have On-Line COVID Report Card

first_imgImage by Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo.ALBANY — Every public school in New York State will have a COVID-19 report card showing the public how schools are dealing with the pandemic.Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the on-line report card as part of his COVID update Tuesday morning.“Teachers don’t want assurances… they want the facts,” Cuomo said. “They don’t really want my opinion, they want the facts. Give me the facts and I’ll come up with my own opinion.”Cuomo said the report card will be comprehensive in letting parents and teachers know how many students and staff have been tested, what the test was, who did the test and what are the results. “Every school district has to report every day as to how many tests were taken, what kind of tests, what were the results,” he said. “We’re going to have a COVID report card for every school in the state.”As part of the report card, school districts, county health departments and testing laboratories must report daily to the state, Cuomo stressed.The results will show how school districts and individual schools are doing in implementing and carrying out plans.Part of the tracking will be positive cases by the date of students and staff, by school and school districts, and whether those tested are schooling  by remote, in-person and hybrid models.Cuomo signed an executive order Tuesday to ensure reporting is done on a daily basis.As schools reopen and districts, local health departments, and labs begin reporting this data to the NYS Dept. of Health, the COVID-19 Report Card will be live at: schoolcovidreportcard.health.ny.gov“Facts empower people to make informed decisions for the health and safety of themselves and their families,” Cuomo said. “The COVID-19 Report Card will give parents, faculty and students the most up-to-date information on the status of their school and their school district’s testing and results. I urge our school communities to stay vigilant and be smart.”The COVID-19 Report Card will provide parents, teachers, students and all New Yorkers with comprehensive data updated on a daily basis, including:Positive infections by date of students & staff by school & school districtWhether school/district (& student and staff) are remote, in-person, or hybridNumber of students and staff on-sitePercentage of on-site students & staff who test positiveNumber of tests administered by the school, test type, lab used and lag timeDate of last submission/update. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Two Teachers At Jamestown Public Schools Test Positive For Coronavirus

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Cropped eflon / Flickr / CC BY 2.0 JAMESTOWN – Two teachers are Jamestown Public Schools have tested positive for COVID-19.The district announced the news on Wednesday afternoon.Officials say one teacher worked at Persell Middle School and the other at Ring Elementary School.The district says both were last in the buildings on Friday and there is no known connection between the cases. “We continue to stress the importance of social distancing, face masks, and frequent hand washing both at school and at home,” said JPS Superintendent Dr. Kevin Whitaker in a statement. “If you or your family members experience any COVID-19 symptoms, please stay home and contact your health provider for a diagnosis. We must continue to work together to keep our community safe and well.”The district would like parents to know that a confirmed case does not mean that children have been exposed to those who tested positive. Any individuals who may have been in close contact, as defined by the Chautauqua County Department of Health, with a confirmed case will be contacted directly by the New York Department of Health contact tracers with pertinent information and next steps.If your child has any symptoms of COVID-19, cough, difficulty breathing, loss of taste or smell, significant diarrhea, sore throat or a fever greater than 100 F or 37.8 C, the district asks parents to contact their health care provider and notify your child’s school health office.last_img read more

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Alice Ripley to Appear for One Night Only in Second Stage’s I See You Made An Effort

first_img View Comments Along with Ripley and Gershon, the lineup will also include Henry Alford, Ilana Levine, Sandra Santiago, Amy Brenneman, Judy Gold, Jessica Hecht, Tonya Pinkins and Annabella Sciorra. Is 50 the new 40 or is 50 just still 50? In I See You Made An Effort, Gurwitch explores the hazards of turning 50, including outsourcing your endocrine system and falling in lust at the Genius bar. Adapted from her upcoming book of the same name, the evening will turn an unflinching and hilarious eye towards the myriad of issues women can expect to encounter in their middle years. From navigating the extensive anti-aging offerings in the department store beauty counter to negotiating the ins-and-outs of acceptable behavior with a teenage son, I See You Made An Effort is the ultimate coming-of-middle-age story and a must-see for women everywhere. Star Filescenter_img Tony winner Alice Ripley (Next to Normal) and Gina Gershon (Bye, Bye, Birdie) are to headline Annabelle Gurwitch’s I See You Made An Effort. The one-night-only special benefit event will take place March 10 as part of the 35th Anniversary Season at Second Stage Theatre. Alice Ripleylast_img read more

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