by The Associated Press Posted Jun 3 2019 90

first_img by The Associated Press Posted Jun 3, 2019 9:08 am PDT This image made available by Sotheby’s on Monday June 3, 2019, shows a newly discovered Lewis Chessman on display at Sotheby’s in London. The medieval chess piece purchased for five pounds by an antiques dealer in Scotland in 1964 has been found to be one of the famous medieval Lewis Chessmen and is expected to bring more than 600,000 pounds when auctioned by Sotheby’s on July 2. (Tristan Fewings/Sotheby’s via AP) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email LONDON — A chess piece purchased for a few pounds (dollars) by an antiques dealer in Scotland in 1964 has been identified as one of the 900-year-old Lewis Chessmen, among the greatest artifacts of the Viking era.Sotheby’s auction house said Monday that the chess piece is expected to bring between 600,000 pounds ($670,000) and 1 million pounds ($1.26 million) at an auction next month.The Lewis Chessmen are intricate, expressive chess pieces in the form of Norse warriors, carved from walrus ivory in the 12th century.A hoard of 93 pieces was discovered in 1831 on Scotland’s Isle of Lewis. It is now held in both the British Museum in London and the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh — but five of the chess pieces were missing.The 3 1/2-inch (8.8-centimetre) piece to be auctioned July 2, the equivalent of a rook, is the first of the missing chessmen to be identified. It was passed down to the family of the antiques dealer, who did not realize its significance.Sotheby’s European sculpture expert Alexander Kader said the find is “one of the most exciting and personal rediscoveries to have been made during my career.”The Associated Press Missing Lewis Chessman found, could fetch $1M at auctionlast_img read more

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Rep Heise announces May office hours Coffee with Kurt events

first_img Categories: News 02May Rep. Heise announces May office hours, Coffee with Kurt events State Rep. Kurt Heise invites residents to meet with him during office hours or “Coffee with Kurt” in May to address questions or concerns regarding state government.“I encourage all who are available to come out on May 9 or May 20, so that I can listen to your concerns and help in any way that I can,” said Rep Heise, R-Plymouth Township. “The hardworking taxpayers in our community deserve to know what’s going on in Lansing and how it could affect them.”Rep. Heise’s in-district office hours will take place Monday, May 9, at the following locations:10-11 a.m., Parthenon Coney Island, located at 39910 Ford Road (east of I-275), CantonNoon-1 p.m., Northville District Library, located at 212 W. Cady St., Northville3-4 p.m., Plymouth District Library, located at 223 S. Main St., PlymouthResidents and business owners are also invited to join Rep. Heise for “Coffee With Kurt” on Friday, May 20 from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Crawford’s Kitchen, located at 542 Starkweather St. in Plymouth.Rep. Heise is also available to meet with constituents by appointment either in the district or at his Lansing office. Residents are invited to call toll free 1-855-REPKURT or e-mail KurtHeise@house.mi.gov to schedule an appointment.last_img read more

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Rep Kesto named chair of Law and Justice Committee

first_img House Speaker Tom Leonard announced today that state Rep. Klint Kesto, of Commerce Township, will lead the House Law and Justice Committee.Kesto said his experience as an assistant prosecuting attorney will be invaluable as the Law and Justice Committee addresses key issues affecting Michigan families.“We made great progress last session resolving legislation related to human trafficking and coercive abortion,” Rep. Kesto said. “We have achieved much, but still have a great deal of work to do to keep our communities and neighborhoods safe. As a former prosecutor, my number one priority is to ensure we continue to fight for the rights and safety of Michigan families.”The third-term lawmaker also will serve on the House Tax Policy, Commerce and Trade, and Elections committees.##### Categories: Featured news,Kesto News,News 26Jan Rep. Kesto named chair of Law and Justice Committeecenter_img Tags: #SB last_img read more

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Rep Hughes invites residents to her JulyAugust office hours

first_img State Rep. Holly Hughes welcomes residents to join her for in-district office hours.“One of the most exciting aspects of my job as a legislator is meeting with people in my hometown on a regular basis,” Hughes said. “I enjoy the opportunity to sit down with people and get a feel for what really matters to them regarding state government.”Rep. Hughes will be available at the following times and locations:Thursday, July 279 a.m. at the Village of Fruitport DPW Building, 45 S. 2nd Ave. in Fruitport; and10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Roosevelt Park City Hall, 900 Oakridge Road in Muskegon.Friday, July 288 to 9 a.m. at Ravenna Round Table, 12396 Stafford St. in Ravenna.Wednesday, Aug. 210 to 11 a.m. at Cedar Creek Township Hall, 6556 Sweeter Road in Twin Lake.Thursday, Aug. 172 to 3 p.m. at Whitehall City Hall in the City Council Chambers, 405 E. Colby St. in Whitehall.Monday, Aug. 289 to 10 a.m. at Holton Township Hall, 6511 E. Holton Whitehall Road in Holton;10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Casnovia Township Office, 245 Canada Road in Casnovia;12 to 1 p.m. at Mr. Quick Drive In, 5501 E. Apple Ave. in Muskegon; and1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Norton Shores Library, 705 Seminole Road in Norton Shores.No appointment is necessary to attend office hours. Anyone unable to attend who would like to voice a question or concern to Rep. Hughes may contact her office at (877) 633-0331 or HollyHughes@house.mi.gov. Categories: Hughes News 13Jul Rep. Hughes invites residents to her July/August office hourslast_img read more

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Net Neutrality and Civil Rights Groups Censorship and Selling Out

first_imgShare1TweetShareEmail1 Shares August 1, 2014; Republic ReportThe debate on “net neutrality” may not be on the front burner for many Americans, but it is an active and contentious issue for its proponents and opponents. Corporate players such as Comcast, Verizon, and other Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have pitched “fast lanes” and “slow lanes” for Internet content, a strategy seen as the antithesis of net neutrality. That was the interpretation of writer Lee Fang, whose analysis had been published on NewsOne, a news and commentary website geared toward an African-American audience, until, Fang contends, NewsOne pulled the article down on orders from the website’s parent company, which happens to be a business partner with Comcast. Fortunately, Fang’s controversial article—“Leading Civil Rights Group Just Sold Out on Net Neutrality”—was picked up by The Nation, among other sites, though it disappeared from several more.Fang’s article argued that a bevy of major civil rights groups, including the NAACP, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the Urban League, the National Council on Black Civil Participation, the National Action Network, the Council of Korean Americans, the Japanese American Citizens League, the National Black Farmers Association, the Rainbow PUSH Coalition, OCA, Asian Pacific American Advocates, and the National Puerto Rican Chamber of Commerce, have joined with the big corporate ISPs to oppose the reclassification of broadband services as a public utility. Fang also identified lobbyists working with minority populations on telecommunications issues, such as the Minority Media and Telecommunications Council (MMTC), raking in big dollars from Comcast, Verizon, and the telecom trade association, the National Cable and Telecommunications Council. Download a Free Guide to Nonprofit Executive LeadershipSpicing his commentary with tales of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and the Organization of Chinese Americans (OCA) from Comcast and AT&T, Fang summed up his piece with this devastating line: “Just as Martin Luther King Jr.’s children have embarrassingly descended into fighting bitterly over what’s left of his estate, the civil rights groups formed to advance Dr. King’s legacy seem willing to sell out their own members for a buck.”The path of NewsOne’s censorship was acknowledged by a NewsOne editor, Abena Agyeman-Fisher, who said that the website’s corporate owner, Radio One, had ordered the article pulled down. Radio One, Fang reports, is a 50 percent business partner with Comcast in a venture called TV One. In addition, MMTC was involved in the retraction of Fang’s article. After Fang was denounced by MMTC vice president Nicol Turner-Lee for being part of a “digital lynch mob”—an unfortunate term to use in the context of a debate around civil rights—MMTC president David Honig admitted that he had reached out to NewsOne about Fang’s article and went on to defend Turner-Lee’s language as reflective of “the vernacular of the movement to which she has devoted her life.”Fang pointed out that Turner-Lee, who had been the VP and first director of the Media and Technology Institute at the Joint Center for Political Studies, had resigned her last pre-MMTC position in the wake of charges of financial improprieties. It appears that she did resign as president and CEO of the National Association for Multi-Ethnicity in Communications after only a year in the position, but the announcement came less than a week after an internal NAMIC organizational audit had pronounced her “cleared of alleged financial and operational improprieties.”Without delving into the arcane details of the net neutrality issue in front of the Federal Communications Commission, two aspects of Fang’s articles are important to Nonprofit Quarterly and should be important to nonprofits in general:Censorship: The reality is that nonprofits frequently self-censor to avoid alienating potential funders, particularly funders with corporate agendas. Garry C. Gray of the University of Toronto and Victoria Bishop Kendzia of Humboldt University published a paper a few years ago arguing persuasively that nonprofit organizations are increasingly redefining their missions and goals in order to appeal to corporate funders. We would argue that in practice, many nonprofits avoid pursuing their missions and goals in order to avoid alienating funders that frequently are playing expanding roles in providing critical funding. In the press, self-censorship has long been a troublesome dynamic, with some four out of ten journalists in one survey acknowledging that they had either avoided some stories or softened the tone of others in order to benefit their news organizations, with “market pressures” as the primary factor behind their self-censorship. Project Censored maintains a running list of important stories that were largely squelched even though they have been subsequently validated. The dynamic of censorship is already powerful—a violation of what public charities stand for, but difficult to resist, especially for nonprofits concerned about writing or saying something that ticks off their funders.Corporate funding pressure on civil rights groups: This writer remembers a sidebar conversation with a corporate funding representative at a meeting convened by the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, which at the time was engaged in a major effort to promote increased corporate grantmaking for racial and ethnic minorities. Sotto voce and off the record, the funder snickered that his company gave freely to Black and Latino civil rights organizations in order to make them or keep them as allies and supporters—and to minimize the prospects that they might become critics or protesters. Do corporations such as Verizon, Comcast, and AT&T give freely to civil rights organizations simply because they support their civil rights missions, without any expectation of influence over the organization’s attitudes and positions toward corporate priorities?It is a tough question for civil rights organizations to address, especially in light of the reliably incisive (and not “lynch mob”) reporting of Lee Fang. By giving outside of their corporate foundations, corporations have many mechanisms of grantmaking to nonprofits that would not be publicly reported, and because of 501(c)(3) confidentiality rules, the recipients don’t have to report their funders on their 990s too. But an examination of corporate foundation giving to civil rights groups shows patterns of generosity that might have implicit or explicit corporate expectations of friendly civil rights group reactions.The Foundation Directory Online lists 30 grants from the Verizon Foundation to the NAACP, either the national organization or some branches, amounting to $2.82 million between 2006 and 2012. The AT&T Foundation weighed in with six grants totaling $1.63 million. Comcast provided 218 grants between 2006 and 2012 amounting to nearly $4.2 million to the Urban League and its network of local affiliates. Verizon generated 75 grants to the Urban League network totaling $2.98 million. Do civil rights organizations find themselves swayed by the presence and generosity, so to speak, of their corporate benefactors?We would hazard that the civil rights organizations that Fang identifies as having signed on against net neutrality have for the most part historically strong missions and track records. But as Cook and Kendzia noted in their paper, when organizations confront “funding dilemmas,” the kinds of financial crises that even large nonprofits sometimes encounter, organizational missions sometimes suffer and become compromised. We would also suggest that too much dependence on and too much coziness with corporate funders also chip away at nonprofit missions. Fang’s charge is that these civil rights groups have “sold out,” at least when it comes to corporate funders’ position on net neutrality. Fang’s analysis is a challenge that fundamentally asks civil rights organizations, how much corporate funding from the likes of Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, and non-telecom funders like big banks and the Wal-Mart Foundation, all big donors to civil rights groups, is too much corporate money for civil rights to swallow?—Rick CohenShare1TweetShareEmail1 Shareslast_img read more

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McKibben on Why Fossil Fuel Divestment Makes Pragmatic Sense

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 SharesJune 5, 2015; Washington PostIf you don’t know the name Bill McKibben, you have probably seen the results of his work. McKibben is the cofounder of 350.org, the organization that has had as much impact as any in promoting divestment from fossil fuels. His op-ed for the Washington Post this past weekend challenges why anyone would give any credibility to ExxonMobil on the issue of climate change. He discusses ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson’s speech at a recent company’s shareholder meeting in which, according to McKibben, Tillerson made light of climate change and mocked renewable energy. Tillerson rejected the notion that ExxonMobil would consider investing in sun or wind energy because, in McKibben’s words, “clean technologies don’t make enough money and rely on government mandates.”McKibben suggests that “Tillerson’s performance…forever breaks the idea that ‘shareholder engagement’ with companies such as ExxonMobil accomplishes anything.” In other words, there is no point in universities and foundations holding onto their stock investments in the Exxons of the world because they won’t change. There is no productive engagement with Tillerson and Exxon. He suggests that the decision of Vermont Treasurer Beth Pearce, supported by Vermont governor Peter Shumlin, to hold onto their fossil fuel investments on the theory that, Shumlin said, “we are making our voice heard” is a fruitless strategy. Pearce’s shareholder initiative to get ExxonMobil to set greenhouse-gas emission targets got only 10 percent of shareholder votes.Shareholder resolutions like Pearce’s aren’t going to change ExxonMobil. Rather, says McKibben, “they’re designed instead to take pressure off officials like Pearce and Shumlin, who don’t want to offend Wall Street by divesting.” Former Securities and Exchange Commission member Bevis Longstreth says that clean energy initiatives with ExxonMobil are like “trying to convince Philip Morris to give up making cigarettes or Johnnie Walker to abandon its distilleries.” He said that the kind of greenhouse gas resolution that Pearce pushed at ExxonMobil is “most certainly…a fool’s errand.”Will divestment do anything more to change ExxonMobil than shareholder resolutions? McKibben is a realist: “Divestment won’t move ExxonMobil directly—that’s impossible; the company is dug in, and someone else will simply buy the stock when it’s sold.”“But,” McKibben argues, “divestment will undercut the industry’s political power, just as happened a generation ago when the issue was South Africa and hundreds of colleges, churches, and state and local governments took action…Divestment is one tool to change the zeitgeist, so that the day arrives more quickly when the richest and most powerful can no longer mock renewable energy and play down climate change.”It is as we thought: The importance of divestment is its political impact on the public, as major, respected institutions declare that fossil fuels cannot and should not be defended. It is this kind of clear, pragmatic analysis that explains the influence that McKibben and 350.org have had in the fight to reverse the trend of manmade climate change.—Rick CohenShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

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Illinois Supreme Court Maintains Tax Exemption for Illinois Hospitals—For Now

first_imgShare29TweetShare4Email33 Shares“H” by Rusty ClarkMarch 23, 2017; Modern HealthcareIn a 19-page unanimous decision, the Illinois Supreme Court has overruled a state appellate court that had declared unconstitutional a 2012 state law that exempts nonprofit hospitals from paying property taxes. Specifically, the law exempts nonprofit hospitals when the value of their charitable services exceeds the value of the property taxes that would be collected if the hospital were not tax-exempt. However, the supreme court did not rule explicitly on the constitutionality of the law itself, and remanded the case back to district court for further litigation.Carle Foundation Hospital has sued the city of Urbana, Illinois, and other taxing authorities, claiming that the 2012 tax exemption law applied retroactively, meaning that the hospital was due a refund of property taxes paid since 2004. Based on a reading of the supreme court’s decision, the hospital’s litigation is complex, involving multiple local governments and many distinct actions taken at various times by all parties since 2004. The supreme court’s decision was a technical one, declaring that the appeals court exceeded its authority in ruling on the 2012 law’s constitutionality as a separate issue from the rest of the case.The hospital was cautious in its welcoming of the ruling. “While Carle, along with all Illinois hospitals, would like this important issue resolved, it respects the court’s decision to rule on a procedural matter and to not issue an opinion on the constitutionality of the 2012 law at this time,” the hospital said in a statement Wednesday. Carle plans to retry the suit in Champaign County Circuit Court.The underlying issue yet to be resolved is what constitutes “charity” for an Illinois nonprofit hospital when considering its exemption from property taxes? Attorneys for the city of Urbana claim the 2012 law is unconstitutional because it goes too far by assigning a value to the tax exemption, rather than the state constitution’s use of the term “exclusively” when referring to charitable activity. The state’s hospital association had hoped the supreme court would rule on the 2012 state law’s constitutionality, but were “delighted” with the technical ruling maintaining the tax exemption law for the time being.Though the decision might appear to be promising for Illinois’s nonprofit hospitals, the supreme court’s action wasn’t about tax exemption, but about the limits of authority of a state appeals court. The Illinois Supreme Court’s decision on narrow technical grounds leaves open the very likely possibility that it will hear the case again once the lower courts deal with all the issues involved. Nonprofit hospitals and local governments in Illinois will have to wait a while to find out how much charity qualifies a nonprofit hospital to be exempt from property taxes.—Michael WylandShare29TweetShare4Email33 Shareslast_img read more

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Revenues from Italian broadcaster Mediasets pay T

first_imgRevenues from Italian broadcaster Mediaset’s pay TV business increased by 16.5% in the first nine months of the year.Mediaset Premium generated revenues of €449.2 million in the period to September 30, compared to €385.5 million in the corresponding period last year. The number of Easy pay subscribers has also passed the two million mark, Mediaset said.The broadcaster reported a profit of €166.6 million in the first three months of the year, down 13% year-on-year from total net revenues of €3 billion, which was roughly in line with the first nine months of 2010.last_img read more

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Broadcast management software provider Pilat Media

first_imgBroadcast management software provider Pilat Media has launched a new automated metadata management and media preparation workflow for the company’s Integrated Broadcast Management System (IBMS).Now included with IBMS:OnDemand, an IBMS add-on module that provides centralised business management for multiplatform on-demand services, the new workflow streamlines preparation of media for fast-paced content factories, according to Pilat.“As media organisations prepare large volumes of content for delivery via multiplatform over-the-top and on-demand services, they need to be able to automate many mundane, repetitive tasks such as metadata assignment and transcoding,” said Ron Bar-lev, executive vice-president product strategy, Pilat Media. “This new workflow draws on our unique understanding of the OTT environment and addresses our customers’ complex requirements — enabling them to bring new efficiencies to content preparation while deploying the streams as quickly as possible to all of the platforms their viewers demand.”Pilat Media’s new metadata workflow enables IBMS:OnDemand to trigger APIs that automatically import metadata from outside services containing information about programmes,such as entertainment websites such as IMDB with data such as genre, plot synopsis, and cast. The system then merges the metadata with another set of workflows for media preparation, including tasks such as transcoding and QC. IBMS:OnDemand then automatically re-links the programmes and schedules them as on-demand or catch-up offers as appropriate. The offers then appear on the service navigation menu presented to viewers, with the metadata enabling them to search for and purchase titles by genre.last_img read more

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Pan regional pay TV broadcaster Viasat has struck

first_imgPan regional pay TV broadcaster Viasat has struck a volume deal with Hollywood studio NBC Universal for first run and library movies including Snow White and The Huntsman and Ted.The Modern Times Group-owned pay operator has inked a multi-year licensing agreement with the studio for the pay rights in Russia, Ukraine and the other CIS countries.Movies including The Bourne Legacy, The Lorax, Safe House, Inside Man and The Interpreter will be available on MTG’s TV1000 Premium HD and TV1000 Megahit HD movie channels as well as available via its subscription video-on-demand service Viaplay in Russia.Irina Gofman, executive vice-president of Russia and CIS and pay TV emerging markets for Viasat Broadcasting, said: “NBC Universal has a great track record of outstanding movies and franchises. We now have multi-year movie licence agreements with four out of the big six Hollywood studios for our , and our content offering on the TV1000 Premium HD and TV1000 Megahit HD movie channels, and our Viaplay SVOD service. This content offering is unrivalled in Russia, Ukraine and the CIS.”last_img read more

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French channel provider AB Group is to launch subs

first_imgFrench channel provider AB Group is to launch subscription video-on-demand offering Jook Video, on March 21, somewhat later than originally planned.Jean-Michel Fava, president of the group’s pay TV service ABSat, said at the end of last year that the service would launch on January 10, a date that was itself later than initially envisaged.The group, which owns channels AB1 and AB Moteurs and also provides low-cost pay TV service Bis TV.The service will be available on PC and Mac computers, tablet and smartphones initially. AB is also currently in talks with network operators to deliver the service to French TV households. Orange has reportedly already signed up, and Fava has said he is in talks with Numericable and Free.The group will initially offer 10,000 hours of programming across eight categories – movies, drama, kids, Manga, documentary, sport, music and live events. Content partners include MGM, the BBC, Warner, Sony and ABC. Jook Video will be positioned as a long tail service with a mix of catalogue titles.AB plans to charge €6.99 a month for a range of content. The group’s deputy CEO Jean-Michel Fava has previously said that it aimed to sign up 300,000 subscribers to the service, without specifying a target date for that number.last_img read more

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Just over one million US pay TV customers cut the

first_imgJust over one million US pay TV customers cut the cord in favour of online video last year, according to a report by Convergence Consulting.About 1.08 million US customers cancelled their pay TV services in favour of online video options and free-to-air TV last year, according to the Toronto-based group. Convergence Consulting said that about 3.74 million pay TV subscribers had cut the cord over the last four years and that the total would reach 4.7 million this year.The group estimated that 31,000 pay TV subscribers were added last year, down from 112,000 in 2011. However, 98,000 new subscribers are expected to sign up this year – a figure that is still considerably lower than the average 1.86 million that signed up for pay TV between 2004-09.Online subscriptions to Netflix and like services represented 28% of US movie/TV rental market revenue in 2012 and is expected to rise to 34% this year, with the share attributed to video-on-demand services from traditional pay TV operators forecast to fall from 20% to 19%. Video store revenue is expected to fall from 13% to 9%, with DVD mail services likely to fall from 15% to 12%.last_img read more

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Chinese telecoms equipment provider ZTE has secure

first_imgChinese telecoms equipment provider ZTE has secured a four-year IPTV network construction contract with Telkom Indonesia.ZTE will construct, operate, and maintain the low-bit-rate Indonesian IPTV network, starting this year until 2016, and will provide system equipment and set-top boxes.ZTE has offices around the world, including in Europe and Asia Pacific. Telekom Indonesia is the largest fixed line operator in Indonesia.last_img

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The number of Ultra HD satellite channels globally

first_imgThe number of Ultra HD satellite channels globally is expected to number at least 315 by 2024, according to Northern Sky Research.According to the latest edition of NSR’s Linear TV via Satellite: DTH, OTT & IPTV report, UHD channels will occupy 70 satellite transponders by 2024, or 1.2% of global Ku-band capacity.NSR expects the number of channels distributed via satellite to cable and IPTV headends to reach 180 on Ku-band and a further 75 on C-band by 2024, occupying a combined total of 57 transponders and accounting for US$219 million in leasing revenues.According to NSR, operators in developing markets including India and Russia are looking to UHD to target groups of people with higher levels of disposable income, while most growth will come from SD channels. Operators in developed markets including the US, Korea and Japan view UHD as a way to increase ARPU at a time when subscriber growth is more or less tapped out.last_img read more

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Paolo Bozzola ContentWise has partnered with multi

first_imgPaolo BozzolaContentWise has partnered with multi-lingual video content metadata platform, Babeleye, to bring personalised TV experiences to the Middle East and Africa (MEA).ContentWise – which specialises in personalisation, discovery and recommendations for digital TV content – will integrate Babeleye’s metadata platform, allowing it to deliver search, discovery and recommendations for local content.ContentWise is integrating Babeleye’s solution into its Personalisation System and Knowledge Factory metadata processing engine and will now provide advanced content search, discovery and recommendations for Arabic and other content in the MEA region.“As one of the fastest growing pay-TV markets, the MEA region is a key market for us as we continue to expand globally. The partnership with Babeleye ensures that we are able to deliver the very best, personal TV experience to viewers across the region,” said ContentWise CEO Paolo Bozzola.Babeleye’s mapping of local market metadata in the MEA region offers metadata across multiple platforms and in multiple countries, with a particular focus on the Arab region.Babeleye sales director, Lasse Schmidt, said: “Our partnership not only benefits local viewers, but it also means TV providers across the region will be able to get the very best of Babeleye and ContentWise technologies in one, ready to use platform.”last_img read more

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Some 35 of all TV and video viewing is now watche

first_imgSome 35% of all TV and video viewing is now watched on-demand with over half of consumers claiming to watch streamed on-demand content at least once a day, according to new research.Ericsson’s 2015 ConsumerLab TV and Media Report, which surveyed 22,500 people from 20 countries around the world, claims that consumers now spend six hours per week watching streamed on-demand TV series, programs, and movies – more than double the equivalent 2011 figure.While linear TV remains high, Ericsson said that linear viewing is linked to age, with 82% of 60–69 year olds claiming to watch linear TV on a daily basis compared to just 60% of millennials aged 16–34.“This is a clear indication that linear TV will have to continue to reinvent itself in order to remain relevant to the younger population,” said the report.Nearly two thirds of teenagers’ total TV and video viewing time is now spent on a mobile device such as a smartphone, tablet, or laptop, according to the research.Across all age groups, 61% of consumers watch video on their smartphones, an increase of 71% since 2012, with the average time spent watching video on mobile devices up 3 hours a week compared to three years ago.Close to one in 10 consumers also claimed to watch YouTube for more than three hours per day. In the US alone, 41% of people used YouTube at least daily and 71% at least weekly, while 27% of US consumers watch Netflix daily and 52% do weekly.“The continued rise of streamed video on demand and UGC services reflects the importance of three specific factors to today’s viewers: great content, flexibility, and a high-quality overall experience. Innovative business models that support these three areas are now crucial to creating TV and video offerings that are both relevant and attractive,” said Anders Erlandsson, senior advisor, Ericsson ConsumerLab.Among viewers that subscribe to SVoD services like Netflix, Amazon Prime and HBO Now, 87% said they binge-view at least once a week. : Half of linear TV viewers said they can’t find anything to watch on a daily basis.The report interviewed consumers aged 16-59 and 60-69 across 20 markets, including countries like France, Germany, Spain, the UK, Turkey, Russia, the US, China, Brazil and Mexico.last_img read more

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Bates Motel Middle East pay TV operator OSN has si

first_imgBates MotelMiddle East pay TV operator OSN has signed a new and extended long-term deal with NBCUniversal International that secures first pay window rights for the platform, in addition to exclusive OTT rights for OSN Play, its  digital platform that is free to subscribers, and Go, its non-subscriber based online TV service.OSN will now also have exclusive rights to the popular channel, E! Entertainment Television, with dedicated primetime programming that is dubbed or subtitled in Arabic.The deal also includes carriage of Syfy in Arabic, from mid-2016. The launch of the channel will bring Syfy’s original series, movies, science fiction and fantasy programming to OSN subscribers, with almost 80% of the content in Arabic, according to OSN.Forthcoming TV series titles from NBCUniversal include Suits, Mr. Robot, Bates Motel and Brooklyn Nine-Nine, while film titles include Minions, Furious 7 and Jurassic World.The new agreement also extends OSN’s carriage agreement for CNBC.“The pay TV industry will be led by those who own the most compelling content, and OSN is dominating the space of original and exclusive programming through our long-term channel and content partnerships such as with NBCUniversal International, which truly opens a universe of unmatched content available now only for OSN subscribers,” said David Butorac, CEO of OSN.“Our partnership with NBCUniversal International not only consolidates our presence in the market but also reflects our commitment to delivering sought-after content first and exclusively to our viewers. We do not operate as just content carriers; we also work with our partners to ensure that we can customise their content for the local market. That is why we will be focusing on localisation and bringing amazing Arabic content – through E! and Syfy.”Belinda Menendez, president, NBCUniversal International Distribution and Networks, said: “We are delighted to expand our presence in the Middle East and Northern Africa via a long-term agreement with OSN that, for subscribers, boasts new programming localised in Arabic, along with the launch of Syfy and also ensures that OSN’s subscribers will continue to enjoy the programming on CNBC and our critically acclaimed TV series and films.”last_img read more

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BT reported a decline in TV customers in its most

first_imgBT reported a decline in TV customers in its most recent quarter, despite claiming record viewing figures for BT Sport.Announcing third quarter results for the three months ended December 31 2017, BT said it lost 5,000 TV customers during the quarter.This compares to a gain of 52,000 TV customers during the same quarter in 2016. However, BT’s overall TV base now stands at 1.8 million customers, up from 1.7 million a year earlier.Despite this the company said that average BT Sport viewing figures for the quarter increased 23% year-on-year, “making it our best performing quarter since launch”.It attributed this to continued strong performance of the UEFA Champions League as well as BT’s exclusive coverage of the Ashes cricket tournament.“Not a good year for TV with only 21,000 net additions, this was extremely disappointing,” said Paolo Pescatore, vice-president, multiplay and media, CCS Insight, who described the quarter as “somewhat challenging” for BT.“Marc Allera has a lot to ponder and the new organisation structure cannot come soon enough. However, all eyes are on the Premier League auction. We believe that this is a pivotal moment for BT Sport.”During the quarter BT announced a multi-year deal with Sky to sell Sky’s Now TV service to BT TV customers through its platform, giving viewers access to Sky Sports, Sky Cinema and Sky’s entertainment channels from early 2019.Overall BT reported operating profit of £854 million, up 17% year-on-year. Revenue was down 3% to £5.97 billion which it mainly attributed to a 9% revenue decline at its global services division.last_img read more

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Science fiction and fantasy has become the most po

first_imgScience fiction and fantasy has become the most popular genre among Netflix subscribers and this preference is being reflected by Netflix’s commissioning behaviour, according to Ampere Analysis.Stanger ThingsThe research firm said that following the success of flagship series like Stranger Things, sci-fi and fantasy was the most popular genre on Netflix in Q1 2018 with 12% of users favouring this programming.The genre overtook previous leader comedy, which was favoured by 11% of Netflix users in Q1, down from 14% a year earlier.Ampere said that in response to this preference change, recent commissioning data indicates that 29% of all upcoming Netflix originals are sci-fi and fantasy – higher than any other genre.Netflix’s movie acquisitions were also found to reflect this trend, as seen by titles like The Cloverfield Paradox and Annihilation.“Changes in Ampere’s consumer data suggest that we could be foreseeing a second golden age for sci-fi and fantasy television,” said Olivia Deane, Analyst at Ampere Analysis.“An increase in preference for the genre is also being reflected by recent commissioning trends, with several broadcasters stating their increased investment in sci-fi and Fantasy programming.”The research firm cited shows like HBO’s Westworld, CBS All Access’ Star-Trek: Discovery and Apple’s forthcoming reboot of Amazing Stories as part of the new wave of big-budget sci-fi and fantasy series.“Ampere’s Netflix commissioning data shows how the streaming giant has been able to respond dynamically to changes in preference. The fact that we have been able to mirror Netflix’s programming behaviour for several genres, means that we have strong insights into the likely programming requirements of the streaming giant in the future.”The research compared Ampere’s consumer data, taken from interviews with over 66,000 people in 16 markets, with Netflix’s programme commissioning behaviour to see how the streaming service has been able to adapt its originals catalogue to meet changing viewing preferences.last_img read more

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