Best Friends Animal Society Hosts NKLA Adoption Weekend

first_imgMore than 400 shelter pets found themselves in new homes on Saturday and Sunday, thanks to the NKLA Adoption Weekend held at La Brea Tar Pits.Tricia Helfer at the NKLA Adoption WeekendCredit/Copyright: Best Friends Animal SocietyThe popular event is hosted by Best Friends Animal Society as part of its NKLA (No-Kill Los Angeles) initiative to make Los Angeles the nation’s largest no-kill city by 2017. It is one of several Best Friends “Super Adoptions” held nationally throughout the year and one that brings out several celebrities who support pet adoption.Rachelle Lefevre cheers on adopters at the Best Friends NKLA Adoption WeekendCredit/Copyright: Best Friends Animal SocietyMarley, a senior Yorkie mix, was the first adoption at the event. “This is our fourth time coming to the event. Usually we just look, but today, Marley came up to my mom and she fell in love,” said Trivial Swain of Los Angeles. “Adoption is the right thing to do.”Tom Morello and his MomCredit/Copyright: Best Friends Animal SocietyCelebrities including Emmy Rossum, Rachelle Lefevre, Linda Hunt, Tricia Helfer, Bonnie-Jill Laflin, Tom Morello, Michael Lomenda, Jack McGhee, Melissa Ordway, Justin Gaston and @TunaMeltsMyHeart (a rescued Chiweenie who rose to Instagram fame with more than 1 million followers), showed their support for NKLA Adoption Weekend and the importance of pet adoption.The celebrities appeared on stage before heading over to greet adopters and ring the adoption bell every time a pet found a new home. In addition to supporting the cause, Rossum, Laflin and Lomenda each went home with a new best friend.Emmy Rossum is smothered with kisses from an adorable pit pull puppy at the Best Friends NKLA Adoption WeekendCredit/Copyright: Best Friends Animal SocietyRossum adopted a black and grey Lhasa Apso mix named Sheila from Baldwin Park Shelter, renaming her Pepper to fit in with her rescue dogs Sugar and Cinnamon.“The work that Best Friends Animal Society and the NKLA coalition are doing to make Los Angeles a no-kill city is very important to me, not just because I love animals, but also because I live here,” said Rossum, who stars in “Shameless” on Showtime. “Thousands of wonderful dogs and cats are dying in our nation’s shelters every day simply because they don’t have homes. I encourage everyone to adopt their next pet and to spay or neuter their pets. If we work together, we will save them all.”Pets at the NKLA Adoption Weekend came from a variety of local shelters and rescues, including Los Angeles Animal Services and Best Friends Pet Adoption Center in Mission Hills, as well as NKLA coalition partners such as Wags N Walks, Labs and Friends, Angel City Pit Bulls, Boston Buddies, Caring Friends Cat Rescue and Kitty Bungalow. Adoption fees started at $50 and all pets were spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and micro-chipped.“Everyone at Los Angeles Animal Services is thrilled that we were able to find homes for so many dogs and cats,” said Brenda Barnette, LAAS general manager. “Events like NKLA Adoption Weekend are great for letting the community see what fantastic companion animals can be found in local shelters.”
Adoption is crucial to end the killing of approximately 9,000 dogs and cats in American shelters each day, according to Marc Peralta, executive director of Best Friends Animal Society – Los Angeles.“By adopting a pet, you’re potentially saving two lives – the one you take home and the one who now has a space at the shelter,” Peralta said. “If you didn’t get a chance to come to NKLA Adoption Weekend, check out the incredible dogs and cats available at a shelter or rescue near you.”last_img read more

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MIRVISH AIMS FOR SCREECHIN WORLD RECORD AT COME FROM AWAY PERFORMANCE

first_imgThe cast of ‘Come From Away’ is shown in this undated handout photo. (HO / The Canadian Press) Advertisement TORONTO — Prepare the cod: Mirvish Productions plans to attempt the world’s largest screech-in at a performance of the hit Newfoundland-set musical “Come From Away” in Toronto next month.A screech-in is a traditional Newfoundland welcoming ceremony involving downing a type of rum, kissing a codfish and reciting a short speech full of local expressions.Mirvish says it will attempt the screech-in milestone with the entire audience following the evening performance of “Come From Away” on July 6 at the Elgin Theatre. Advertisement Twitter The theatre production company hopes to make a Guinness World Record by having all of the patrons in the 1,000-seat theatre perform the initiation.Mirvish says every audience member will receive a small fake plastic cod to kiss and a shot to drink at the end of the show.The shot options will be real screech or ginger ale for those who are not of drinking age or don’t wish to have alcohol.“Come From Away,” written and created by Canadian couple Irene Sankoff and David Hein, tells the true story of how the tiny town of Gander, N.L., welcomed more than 7,000 stranded airline passengers after 9/11.Brian Mosher, a former Gander teacher/broadcaster who inspired the character of Janice Mosher in the musical, will officiate the Mirvish screech-in onstage.Typically a screech-in is done in Newfoundland and Labrador, so Mosher will have a bag of soil from the province with him during the ceremony to make it legitimate, says Mirvish.He’ll also bring a few audience members onstage to kiss the big fake cod used in the show.After the ceremony, the band will play lively music and participants will get certificates saying they’re honorary Newfoundlanders.Mirvish says it hopes to have a Guinness official on site to witness the mass screech-in.“But I have to say, Guinness doesn’t know what the record is,” John Karastamatis, director of sales and marketing at Mirvish Productions, said in a phone interview.“In St. John’s on George Street, which is the main street where all the pubs are, they often have group screech-ins in good weather but they can’t fit 1,000 people. So we think we will have the record, if we’re successful at this.”“Come From Away” has won scores of awards, including a Tony, and is currently playing in London, on Broadway and on tour across North America.It’s now in its second year in Toronto and Mirvish hopes it will stay in the city for good.“Our goal is for it to go on forever,” said Karastamatis.“It’s still selling out and it’s still attracting a very non-traditional group of people to the show…. The reason they’re coming is because it’s Canadian. That is, I believe, its main selling feature — that it celebrates a Canadian story albeit with people from other places.”By Victoria Ahearn ~ The Associated Presscenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement Facebooklast_img read more

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Video Morocco Beats Gabon in Stellar Performance

Rabat – Millions of Moroccan football fans are cheering for their national team and praising the Atlas Lions center forward Khalid Boutaib for a much-needed victory over Gabon in Group C’s fifth round of the 2018 World Cup African Qualifiers during the two teams’s face-off in Mohammed V stadium in Casablanca on Saturday.

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OSC gives approval sets operating conditions for Maple Group takeover of TMX

TORONTO — Maple Group Acquisition Corp. says the Ontario Securities Commission has approved final recognition orders with respect to Maple’s proposed acquisition of TMX Group, operator of Canada’s major stock exchanges.The orders, expected to be published later Wednesday, set out the terms under which Maple will be permitted to operate a combined exchange and clearing group involving the TMX along with the alternative Alpha Trading Systems Inc. and the Canadian Depository for Securities Ltd.“Maple and the Maple investors are in agreement with the expected final forms of these orders applicable to them,” according to a statement issued by the group, a consortium of some of Canada’s largest pension funds, banks and other financial institutions.Quebec’s securities regulators, the Autorite des marches financiers, previously published final recognition orders with respect to Maple’s proposed acquisition of TMX Group and Alpha.Maple and the TMX Group said they have since been advised that the AMF intends to also soon issue a final recognition order approving Maple’s proposed acquisition of CDS.The recognition orders follow comprehensive reviews that included public hearings and public comment periods.However, the proposed takeover and mergers remain under review by the British Columbia Securities Commission, the Alberta Securities Commission and the federal Competition Bureau.“We are very pleased with the strong progress being made to secure the necessary regulatory approvals,” said Maple Group chief spokesman Luc Bertrand.“We hope to receive the remaining approvals shortly and look forward to beginning the work to implement our vision for a more globally competitive exchange in Canada.”TMX CEO Tom Kloet said the recognition orders would provide enhanced regulatory oversight “and the foundations upon which we will build an efficient and globally competitive exchange group.”Meanwhile, Maple also confirmed that Kevin Sullivan, deputy chairman of GMP Capital Inc., will serve as a nominee to the Maple Board from the independent investment dealer community.In order to satisfy a requirement in the final OSC and AMF recognition orders that the Maple Board include no more than 50% representation from the original Maple shareholder group, GMP has agreed to withdraw from the Maple investor group.GMP’s investment in Maple, which represented a less than 1% stake, will be taken up by the other Maple investors, none of whom will own greater than 10%.Under the deal, Maple’s offer to acquire a minimum of 70% and a maximum of 80% of the shares of TMX Group for $50 in cash per share is open until 5 p.m. eastern time on July 31 unless further extended or withdrawn.The offer is part of an integrated acquisition transaction, valued at approximately $3.8 billion, to acquire 100% of TMX Group shares.The investors in Maple Group Acquisition Corporation are the Alberta Investment Management Corp., Caisse de depot et placement du Quebec, the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, CIBC World Markets Inc., Desjardins Financial Group, Dundee Capital Markets Inc., Fonds de solidarite des travailleurs du Quebec, National Bank Financial & Co. Inc., Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, Scotia Capital Inc., TD Securities Inc. and The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company. read more

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Key foreign currency quotations

Quotations for key foreign currencies in terms of the Canadian dollar. Quotations are nominal, for information purposes only.Canadian dollar value on Wednesday, the previous day, three-months and one-year: Currency Wed Tue 3 months Year U.S. dollar 1.2560 1.2514 1.3720 1.3102 British Pound 1.6619 1.6539 1.7728 1.7487 Japanese Yen 0.0114 0.0114 0.0122 0.0130 Euro in U.S. 1.1855 1.1810 1.0912 1.1223 Euro in Cdn 1.4890 1.4779 1.4971 1.4704Quotations provided by the Bank of Canada

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Russia to back Sri Lanka at UNHRC

The Ambassador said that Russia will object to any pressure being exerted on Sri Lanka by other countries on human rights related issues. Russia will back Sri Lanka at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) in Geneva next month, the Russian Ambassador to Sri Lanka Alexander Karavaev said today.He gave this assurance when he met Prime Minister D.M Jayaratne at the Prime Minister’s office. He also said that Russia will this year boost assistance in the fields of technology and defence to Sri Lanka. The Ambassador said that Russia is expected to deliver at least four helicopters to Sri Lanka this year. (Colombo Gazette) read more

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EU clinches deal to end mobile roaming charges end unfair blocking of

by Lorne Cook, The Associated Press Posted Jun 30, 2015 10:23 am MDT Last Updated Jun 30, 2015 at 10:50 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email BRUSSELS – The European Union has agreed to end mobile roaming charges within two years and allow travellers with European phone plans to pay the same price for calls, text messages and data anywhere in the 28 EU nations.The deal, sealed by lawmakers and EU country representatives Tuesday, also means Internet users will be able to access content without being unfairly slowed down or blocked, a concept known as net neutrality.The agreement would see roaming charges abolished by June 2017. A transition phase will begin next April, when charges will already be four times lower for some consumers.The deal was welcomed as “fantastic news” by British Prime Minister David Cameron, who has promised a referendum on his country’s future in the EU before the end of 2017.He said it “shows that the EU can show the flexibility and creativity to deliver changes that benefit people in this country and across Europe.”From April 30, a maximum roaming surcharge of 5 euro cents per minute will be allowed for calls, 2 euro cents for text messages and 5 euro cents per megabyte for data.But roaming providers will be allowed to charge a small basic fee in case of abuses. It could be applied in cases where a person buys a SIM card in a European country with low prices and permanently roams, rather than paying for costlier services where he or she lives.Top EU top digital affairs official Guenther Oettinger welcomed the move, saying that cuts to roaming charges and net neutrality are “essential for consumers and businesses.”The deal, once approved by EU nations and the full parliament, would allow Internet providers to use “reasonable” measures to manage online traffic, but blocking would only be allowed in limited circumstances, such as dealing with cyber-attacks. EU clinches deal to end mobile roaming charges, end unfair blocking of Internet traffic read more

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Gina Miller and John Major launch legal challenge to prorogation as former

It comes just one day after Mr Johnson fought off a similar action in Scotland. A judge at the Court of Session in Edinburgh ruled on Wednesday that the planned prorogation was lawful.Lord Pannick said Mr Johnson sees Parliament as a “threat to the implementation of his policies” and as “impeding the pursuance of those policies”, in particular whether a deal can be made with the EU. He also said that, in his submission, the Prime Minister “has been very clear” that he views Parliament as a “nuisance” and a “detriment”. The case is expected to last one day before the three judges reach a decision. A legal challenge to the five-week suspension of parliament was brought before three leading judges on Thursday by Gina Miller, the anti-Brexit campaigner, backed by the former Prime Minister. The prorogation of Parliament by the Prime Minister has been deemed an “unlawful abuse of power” in the High Court as John Major raised “grave concerns” about the threat it posed to the British public. The Queen last month accepted the advice of Boris Johnson to prorogue Parliament for the longest period in 40 years, which critics claimed was designed to stop MPs thwarting a no-deal Brexit. The urgent judicial review application was brought off the back of Ms Miller’s successful challenged of the Government at the High Court in 2016 over the triggering of the Article 50 process to start the Brexit countdown. Her new case is supported by a number of other parties, including Sir John and Shami Chakrabarti, the shadow attorney general. Sir John Major  Sir John Major has backed Gina Miller’s court actionCredit:Leon Neal/Getty Images Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A written submission prepared by lawyers on behalf of the former Tory leader said he had “grave concerns about the implications of the prorogation of Parliament for the rights of citizens at a time of critical national importance”. It continued: “If it is unlawful to frustrate or preempt Parliament’s will in relation to an issue on which it has legislated, it must be at least as unlawful – if not more so – to frustrate Parliament’s ability to convene to debate and legislate upon such an issue at all, by proroguing it during a critical period during which any such debate and legislation would need to take place.” The submission added: “The inference is inescapable that the otherwise unexplained length of the prorogation and the very obvious political interest that the Prime Minister has in there being no activity in Parliament during that time, are linked.”Lord Chief Justice Lord Burnett, sitting with two other judges at the High Court in London, is being urged to make a declaration that the decision taken on August 28 to advise the Queen to prorogue Parliament was unlawful.They were told by Lord Pannick QC, representing Ms Miller, that the prorogation of Parliament requested by Mr Johnson was of an “exceptional length” and unlawfully breached parliamentary sovereignty. He told the court: “Our case is that the Prime Minister’s advice to Her Majesty to prorogue Parliament for a period of five weeks is an unlawful abuse of power and the reason it is an unlawful breach of power is that it breaches the legal principle of parliamentary sovereignty. “The effect of prorogation is to remove the ability of Parliament to enact such legislation as it sees fit and on issues of public policy relating to the arrangements for this country to leave the European Union it does so during a period when time is very much of the essence because the deadline deadline, the existing deadline of October 31.” Mr Johnson claims the current session of Parliament is the longest for hundreds of years and ending it would allow him to set out his intention for Government with a new Queen’s speech. However, Lord Pannick said: “There is no dispute that the Prime Minister is entitled to decide that it is appropriate to end this session of Parliament.”We say that what the Prime Minister is not entitled to do is close Parliament for five weeks at such a critical time without justification. “The five week prorogation is simply not required for the purposes of a Queen’s Speech.”He insisted the court was not being asked to express “any view about the wisdom of the UK leaving the European Union, or about the terms on which we leave the EU”. read more

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The House of Commons has got a new group not party so

first_img 16,150 Views Feb 18th 2019, 4:47 PM The seven MPs who spoke at today’s press conference. Share68 Tweet Email https://jrnl.ie/4499533 13 Comments By Rónán Duffy “WE INVITE YOU to leave your parties and help us forge a new consensus on a way forward for Britain.”Chuka Umunna MP made that plea this morning as he and six other MPs confirmed they were leaving the Labour party to form a new political grouping.Not a political party mind, but a parliamentary grouping that will be known as The Independent Group. Smaller independent party groupings may be the norm in the Dáil, including the one that’s part of the government, but in the UK’s parliamentary system they’re rare and today’s move was a big deal. Not least because the threat of a split in the Labour party has been in the offing since Jeremy Corbyn became leader in 2015.Now though, with Brexit less than six weeks ago, the move has finally been made.Teasing the media before the announcement, the group of seven said they were planning an event “relating to the future of British politics”.But will they have any impact beyond today? And what will it mean for Brexit? In their words, the MPs say their main motivation in leaving Labour was because their party has changed radically from the one they joined.Luciana Berger said that she had become “embarrassed and ashamed” to be in the party. But each said the new group is about more than just Labour and that the entire British political system needs overhauling. Umanna said what is being witnessed is “the dysfunctional state of British politics”.Angela Smith MP said that there were “millions of people who are politically homeless” and who are “begging for an alternative.” So as part of that conclusion, The Independent Group has said that it will work with disillusioned supporters and members from both Labour and other parties.“We’ve taken the first step in leaving the old tribal politics behind and we invite others who share our political values to do so too. You might come from a Labour background, but you might come from other political traditions,” Umanna told reporters. Asked whether they were seeking to create a wider movement, the MPs were reluctant to put that label on it, pointing only to a set of values on the group’s website. Some in the Labour leadership have said that if the MPs wish to leave the party they should also quit their seats and run in a by-election, giving voters the chance to judge them as independents. Labour’s shadow chancellor John McDonnell said they should do the “honourable thing” and resign as MPs. The Independent Group members have resisted this, with Chris Leslie arguing that his views have not changed, only that of his party, and that a result a by-election would be “a total distraction”. “What happened, as in my case, is my views has stayed the same but my party has veered off in a hard left ideological direction,” Leslie told Sky News. Speaking later in that same interview about how he will vote in the Commons, Leslie said he would not vote to facilitate any Brexit he feels would be harmful to the British economy. This, is not necessarily the view of the The Independent Group as a whole with Umanna telling reporters that they will not always be voting collectively.“We will see how we will vote on a variety of things depending on our values and we are independent by the way, so it might be that we have different views on different things,” he said.Last week, Prime Minister Theresa May suffered another defeat in the House of Commons, losing a symbolic vote on her government’s plans to secure a new withdrawal deal. The margin in that vote was 303 to 258, displaying the numerical problems faced by May in parliament. The new Independent Group won’t make too much of a difference to those figures, but if there is a general election Labour may just have got some more ground to make up.  The seven MPs who spoke at today’s press conference. Image: PA Images Short URL The House of Commons has got a new group (not party), so what will it mean for Brexit votes? Seven Labour MPs have split from the party. Image: PA Images As the clock ticks down, get all the best Brexit news and analysis in your inbox: Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Monday 18 Feb 2019, 4:47 PMlast_img read more

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Mobile Gaming Giant King Goes High Fashion

first_img Last week mobile gaming’s definitive masters King announced they would be teaming up with Italian fashion powerhouse Moschino. The focus of the new line is King’s most popular property Candy Crush. Whether you like King’s games or not this is pretty impressive that a game you merely play on your phone has reached this level of prestige. The designs are, well…loud, as you would expect if you are familiar with the 30 plus-year-old clothing brand. Their ironic stylings have made them a global force, not unlike King.“We couldn’t think of a better partner to transform Candy Crush into this fun and playful capsule collection that our players will have a chance to own and wear,” said Sebastian Knutsson, Chief Creative Officer at King.The timing of this limited edition collection coincides with Candy Crush‘s five anniversary. Moschino is a company that prides itself on having a pulse on the cultural zeitgeist and intertwining with mobile gaming is certainly a way to keep that tradition alive. “As someone who is inspired by pop culture, it was only a matter of time till I’d play with the iconography of Candy Crush,” said Jeremy Scott, Creative Director for Moschino. And boy did he play with it!The line will include a backpack (650 USD), phone case (70 USD), and swimwear for men and women (250 USD and 300 USD). All of these will be available only on Moschino.com and be produced in a limited run. Whether you like the designs or not this is a fascinating moment for the King in the bigger conversation of branding and worldwide recognition. The Crush products are on sale now!View as: One Page Slides1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Stay on target Legend of Solgard is King’s First Foray Into the RPG GenreCandy Crush Saga “Cupid’s Challenge,” Compete Against Each Other! last_img read more

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Roadway reopens in Southwest MiamiDade following gas line puncture

first_imgSOUTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, FLA. (WSVN) – A roadway in Southwest Miami-Dade has reopened following a gas line puncture, Friday afternoon.Drivers were diverted around the area earlier, as crews worked to fix a natural gas line punctured by a construction crew.The busway and one lane of U.S. 1 were closed while the gas company worked to repair the line. It took a few hours to fix the puncture but the work has now been completed.Traffic is now flowing normally along South Dixie Highway, near Southwest 104th Street.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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62year old man makes car that runs on whisky

first_imgInventor Mickey Nilsson and his bourbon powered car (PhysOrg.com) — Mickey Nilsson, a 62 year old resident of Bardstown Kentucky, has found a way to turn his junk, into a car that runs on Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey. Nilsson, a long time tinkerer, got his inspiration from a character in the film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. The character in question, one Caractacus Potts was best known for re-purposing junk to create new and more useful machines, which is exactly what Mr. Nilsson has done. Citation: 62-year old man makes car that runs on whisky (2011, April 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-year-car-whisky.html The idea of doing something with an old still came to him last October, after he had some unusual visitors. The cast of a TV show, American Pickers, Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz, came to try and purchase some of his items for the show. While they did manager to grab an older oil can from Mr. Nilsson, after making a disparaging crack about the use of his still, they were gently encouraged to leave his property, with the help of a fire arm. After a hasty retreat by the crew, Mr. Nilsson began to think about what he could do with that old still. After that, he spent six months in his workshop turning his pile of junk, still included, into a pretty snazzy looking car. According it is creator it will run on almost any bourbon created. Apparently, the engine prefers Maker’s Mark, though some people may find the cost, and the taste, of Maker’s Mark to be a deterrent from putting it into the car. This car has even attracted attention from the White House. President Obama released a statement saying, “the type of ingenuity that makes this country great. With brilliant minds such as Mr. Nilsson at work, we will soon purge our dependence on the middle east for oil”. A commercial version of this car may even come out in the near future. On Wednesday, Nilsson cut a deal with Nissan. who hope to release the vehicle to the public by 2014. More information: via DailyLoad New discovery: Plaice are spotted (on the inside) © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Colin and Clay Travis Talk Polarized Politics and College Footballs Blind Spot

first_img<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>This week, Colin is joined by founder of Outkick the Coverage, and host of Lock It In, Clay Travis to discuss the current extreme political climate, the upcoming election, and the current climate of extreme polarization. They also look at if college football has become too regional, and the USWNT equal pay debate.Download and subscribe to get all of Colin’s Saturday podcasts exclusively at TheHerdNow.com, iHeart Radio, Google Play, or iTunes.last_img read more

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Experience the XFactor of Carestream DRX Systems

first_img Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Sponsored Content | Videos | Digital Radiography (DR) | September 19, 2012 Experience the X-Factor of Carestream DRX Systems SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Recent Videos View all 606 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Information Technology View all 220 items Technology Reports View all 9 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health View all 62 items Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Experience the X-Factor of Carestream DRX SystemsExperience the X-Factor of Carestream DRX SystemsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:10Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:10 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Carestream is changing the DR game and putting you in control of the move to digital. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

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by The Associated Press Posted Jun 3 2019 90

first_img by The Associated Press Posted Jun 3, 2019 9:08 am PDT This image made available by Sotheby’s on Monday June 3, 2019, shows a newly discovered Lewis Chessman on display at Sotheby’s in London. The medieval chess piece purchased for five pounds by an antiques dealer in Scotland in 1964 has been found to be one of the famous medieval Lewis Chessmen and is expected to bring more than 600,000 pounds when auctioned by Sotheby’s on July 2. (Tristan Fewings/Sotheby’s via AP) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email LONDON — A chess piece purchased for a few pounds (dollars) by an antiques dealer in Scotland in 1964 has been identified as one of the 900-year-old Lewis Chessmen, among the greatest artifacts of the Viking era.Sotheby’s auction house said Monday that the chess piece is expected to bring between 600,000 pounds ($670,000) and 1 million pounds ($1.26 million) at an auction next month.The Lewis Chessmen are intricate, expressive chess pieces in the form of Norse warriors, carved from walrus ivory in the 12th century.A hoard of 93 pieces was discovered in 1831 on Scotland’s Isle of Lewis. It is now held in both the British Museum in London and the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh — but five of the chess pieces were missing.The 3 1/2-inch (8.8-centimetre) piece to be auctioned July 2, the equivalent of a rook, is the first of the missing chessmen to be identified. It was passed down to the family of the antiques dealer, who did not realize its significance.Sotheby’s European sculpture expert Alexander Kader said the find is “one of the most exciting and personal rediscoveries to have been made during my career.”The Associated Press Missing Lewis Chessman found, could fetch $1M at auctionlast_img read more

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Rep Heise announces May office hours Coffee with Kurt events

first_img Categories: News 02May Rep. Heise announces May office hours, Coffee with Kurt events State Rep. Kurt Heise invites residents to meet with him during office hours or “Coffee with Kurt” in May to address questions or concerns regarding state government.“I encourage all who are available to come out on May 9 or May 20, so that I can listen to your concerns and help in any way that I can,” said Rep Heise, R-Plymouth Township. “The hardworking taxpayers in our community deserve to know what’s going on in Lansing and how it could affect them.”Rep. Heise’s in-district office hours will take place Monday, May 9, at the following locations:10-11 a.m., Parthenon Coney Island, located at 39910 Ford Road (east of I-275), CantonNoon-1 p.m., Northville District Library, located at 212 W. Cady St., Northville3-4 p.m., Plymouth District Library, located at 223 S. Main St., PlymouthResidents and business owners are also invited to join Rep. Heise for “Coffee With Kurt” on Friday, May 20 from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Crawford’s Kitchen, located at 542 Starkweather St. in Plymouth.Rep. Heise is also available to meet with constituents by appointment either in the district or at his Lansing office. Residents are invited to call toll free 1-855-REPKURT or e-mail KurtHeise@house.mi.gov to schedule an appointment.last_img read more

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Rep Kesto named chair of Law and Justice Committee

first_img House Speaker Tom Leonard announced today that state Rep. Klint Kesto, of Commerce Township, will lead the House Law and Justice Committee.Kesto said his experience as an assistant prosecuting attorney will be invaluable as the Law and Justice Committee addresses key issues affecting Michigan families.“We made great progress last session resolving legislation related to human trafficking and coercive abortion,” Rep. Kesto said. “We have achieved much, but still have a great deal of work to do to keep our communities and neighborhoods safe. As a former prosecutor, my number one priority is to ensure we continue to fight for the rights and safety of Michigan families.”The third-term lawmaker also will serve on the House Tax Policy, Commerce and Trade, and Elections committees.##### Categories: Featured news,Kesto News,News 26Jan Rep. Kesto named chair of Law and Justice Committeecenter_img Tags: #SB last_img read more

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Rep Hughes invites residents to her JulyAugust office hours

first_img State Rep. Holly Hughes welcomes residents to join her for in-district office hours.“One of the most exciting aspects of my job as a legislator is meeting with people in my hometown on a regular basis,” Hughes said. “I enjoy the opportunity to sit down with people and get a feel for what really matters to them regarding state government.”Rep. Hughes will be available at the following times and locations:Thursday, July 279 a.m. at the Village of Fruitport DPW Building, 45 S. 2nd Ave. in Fruitport; and10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Roosevelt Park City Hall, 900 Oakridge Road in Muskegon.Friday, July 288 to 9 a.m. at Ravenna Round Table, 12396 Stafford St. in Ravenna.Wednesday, Aug. 210 to 11 a.m. at Cedar Creek Township Hall, 6556 Sweeter Road in Twin Lake.Thursday, Aug. 172 to 3 p.m. at Whitehall City Hall in the City Council Chambers, 405 E. Colby St. in Whitehall.Monday, Aug. 289 to 10 a.m. at Holton Township Hall, 6511 E. Holton Whitehall Road in Holton;10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Casnovia Township Office, 245 Canada Road in Casnovia;12 to 1 p.m. at Mr. Quick Drive In, 5501 E. Apple Ave. in Muskegon; and1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Norton Shores Library, 705 Seminole Road in Norton Shores.No appointment is necessary to attend office hours. Anyone unable to attend who would like to voice a question or concern to Rep. Hughes may contact her office at (877) 633-0331 or HollyHughes@house.mi.gov. Categories: Hughes News 13Jul Rep. Hughes invites residents to her July/August office hourslast_img read more

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Net Neutrality and Civil Rights Groups Censorship and Selling Out

first_imgShare1TweetShareEmail1 Shares August 1, 2014; Republic ReportThe debate on “net neutrality” may not be on the front burner for many Americans, but it is an active and contentious issue for its proponents and opponents. Corporate players such as Comcast, Verizon, and other Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have pitched “fast lanes” and “slow lanes” for Internet content, a strategy seen as the antithesis of net neutrality. That was the interpretation of writer Lee Fang, whose analysis had been published on NewsOne, a news and commentary website geared toward an African-American audience, until, Fang contends, NewsOne pulled the article down on orders from the website’s parent company, which happens to be a business partner with Comcast. Fortunately, Fang’s controversial article—“Leading Civil Rights Group Just Sold Out on Net Neutrality”—was picked up by The Nation, among other sites, though it disappeared from several more.Fang’s article argued that a bevy of major civil rights groups, including the NAACP, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the Urban League, the National Council on Black Civil Participation, the National Action Network, the Council of Korean Americans, the Japanese American Citizens League, the National Black Farmers Association, the Rainbow PUSH Coalition, OCA, Asian Pacific American Advocates, and the National Puerto Rican Chamber of Commerce, have joined with the big corporate ISPs to oppose the reclassification of broadband services as a public utility. Fang also identified lobbyists working with minority populations on telecommunications issues, such as the Minority Media and Telecommunications Council (MMTC), raking in big dollars from Comcast, Verizon, and the telecom trade association, the National Cable and Telecommunications Council. Download a Free Guide to Nonprofit Executive LeadershipSpicing his commentary with tales of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and the Organization of Chinese Americans (OCA) from Comcast and AT&T, Fang summed up his piece with this devastating line: “Just as Martin Luther King Jr.’s children have embarrassingly descended into fighting bitterly over what’s left of his estate, the civil rights groups formed to advance Dr. King’s legacy seem willing to sell out their own members for a buck.”The path of NewsOne’s censorship was acknowledged by a NewsOne editor, Abena Agyeman-Fisher, who said that the website’s corporate owner, Radio One, had ordered the article pulled down. Radio One, Fang reports, is a 50 percent business partner with Comcast in a venture called TV One. In addition, MMTC was involved in the retraction of Fang’s article. After Fang was denounced by MMTC vice president Nicol Turner-Lee for being part of a “digital lynch mob”—an unfortunate term to use in the context of a debate around civil rights—MMTC president David Honig admitted that he had reached out to NewsOne about Fang’s article and went on to defend Turner-Lee’s language as reflective of “the vernacular of the movement to which she has devoted her life.”Fang pointed out that Turner-Lee, who had been the VP and first director of the Media and Technology Institute at the Joint Center for Political Studies, had resigned her last pre-MMTC position in the wake of charges of financial improprieties. It appears that she did resign as president and CEO of the National Association for Multi-Ethnicity in Communications after only a year in the position, but the announcement came less than a week after an internal NAMIC organizational audit had pronounced her “cleared of alleged financial and operational improprieties.”Without delving into the arcane details of the net neutrality issue in front of the Federal Communications Commission, two aspects of Fang’s articles are important to Nonprofit Quarterly and should be important to nonprofits in general:Censorship: The reality is that nonprofits frequently self-censor to avoid alienating potential funders, particularly funders with corporate agendas. Garry C. Gray of the University of Toronto and Victoria Bishop Kendzia of Humboldt University published a paper a few years ago arguing persuasively that nonprofit organizations are increasingly redefining their missions and goals in order to appeal to corporate funders. We would argue that in practice, many nonprofits avoid pursuing their missions and goals in order to avoid alienating funders that frequently are playing expanding roles in providing critical funding. In the press, self-censorship has long been a troublesome dynamic, with some four out of ten journalists in one survey acknowledging that they had either avoided some stories or softened the tone of others in order to benefit their news organizations, with “market pressures” as the primary factor behind their self-censorship. Project Censored maintains a running list of important stories that were largely squelched even though they have been subsequently validated. The dynamic of censorship is already powerful—a violation of what public charities stand for, but difficult to resist, especially for nonprofits concerned about writing or saying something that ticks off their funders.Corporate funding pressure on civil rights groups: This writer remembers a sidebar conversation with a corporate funding representative at a meeting convened by the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, which at the time was engaged in a major effort to promote increased corporate grantmaking for racial and ethnic minorities. Sotto voce and off the record, the funder snickered that his company gave freely to Black and Latino civil rights organizations in order to make them or keep them as allies and supporters—and to minimize the prospects that they might become critics or protesters. Do corporations such as Verizon, Comcast, and AT&T give freely to civil rights organizations simply because they support their civil rights missions, without any expectation of influence over the organization’s attitudes and positions toward corporate priorities?It is a tough question for civil rights organizations to address, especially in light of the reliably incisive (and not “lynch mob”) reporting of Lee Fang. By giving outside of their corporate foundations, corporations have many mechanisms of grantmaking to nonprofits that would not be publicly reported, and because of 501(c)(3) confidentiality rules, the recipients don’t have to report their funders on their 990s too. But an examination of corporate foundation giving to civil rights groups shows patterns of generosity that might have implicit or explicit corporate expectations of friendly civil rights group reactions.The Foundation Directory Online lists 30 grants from the Verizon Foundation to the NAACP, either the national organization or some branches, amounting to $2.82 million between 2006 and 2012. The AT&T Foundation weighed in with six grants totaling $1.63 million. Comcast provided 218 grants between 2006 and 2012 amounting to nearly $4.2 million to the Urban League and its network of local affiliates. Verizon generated 75 grants to the Urban League network totaling $2.98 million. Do civil rights organizations find themselves swayed by the presence and generosity, so to speak, of their corporate benefactors?We would hazard that the civil rights organizations that Fang identifies as having signed on against net neutrality have for the most part historically strong missions and track records. But as Cook and Kendzia noted in their paper, when organizations confront “funding dilemmas,” the kinds of financial crises that even large nonprofits sometimes encounter, organizational missions sometimes suffer and become compromised. We would also suggest that too much dependence on and too much coziness with corporate funders also chip away at nonprofit missions. Fang’s charge is that these civil rights groups have “sold out,” at least when it comes to corporate funders’ position on net neutrality. Fang’s analysis is a challenge that fundamentally asks civil rights organizations, how much corporate funding from the likes of Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, and non-telecom funders like big banks and the Wal-Mart Foundation, all big donors to civil rights groups, is too much corporate money for civil rights to swallow?—Rick CohenShare1TweetShareEmail1 Shareslast_img read more

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