International Day of Persons with Disabilities Symposium

first_imgPromoting social and economic inclusion for people with disabilities in Nova Scotia is the theme of the Symposium on Inclusive Education and Employment to be held Wednesday, Dec. 3. The symposium will take place at the Westin Nova Scotian Hotel to commemorate the United Nations International Day of Persons with Disabilities. It is sponsored in partnership with the Disabled Persons Commission, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission and the Collaborative Partnership Network. “This symposium is an opportunity to highlight the many contributions that persons with disabilities can and do make in the workforce and the province,” said Anne MacRae, executive director of the Disabled Persons Commission. “It is important that we continue to create awareness around issues facing the community and provide education to reduce barriers.” The program includes a roundtable of experts presenting on articles of the United Nations Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The convention, which was adopted in 2007, emphasizes the social aspects of disability, and recognizes barriers to full participation of persons with disabilities on an equal basis with others. To date, 41 countries have ratified the convention. “Nova Scotia has the highest rate of reported disability in Canada, and this is expected to increase with the aging population,” said Krista Daley, director and CEO of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. “It is important that the human rights of people with disabilities are respected and protected, and when the United Nations convention is ratified in Canada it will become another tool to ensure this happens.” Other highlights include a cafe-style dialogue, a ceremony for persons with disabilities, and a luncheon sponsored by the Collaborative Partnerships Network. The symposium and luncheon are essential to celebrate the successful partnership that exists between the Collaborative Partnership Network of specialized agencies, Nova Scotia employers and persons with disabilities to realize the advancement of employment opportunities. “Persons with disabilities contributed about $25 million to the Nova Scotia economy in 2007 with the specialized employment supports of the Collaborative Partnership Network agencies” said Janice Ainsworth, co-chair of the Collaborative Partnership Network Society. “The Collaborative Partnership Network is unwavering in the belief that everyone in Nova Scotia can participate in the labour force to their individual desire and potential.” Input from the symposium will be used to create a framework for moving forward with a vision of social and economic inclusion of persons with disabilities in Nova Scotia.last_img read more

Read More

Key foreign currency quotations

Quotations for key foreign currencies in terms of the Canadian dollar. Quotations are nominal, for information purposes only.Canadian dollar value on Wednesday, the previous day, three-months and one-year: Currency Wed Tue 3 months Year U.S. dollar 1.2560 1.2514 1.3720 1.3102 British Pound 1.6619 1.6539 1.7728 1.7487 Japanese Yen 0.0114 0.0114 0.0122 0.0130 Euro in U.S. 1.1855 1.1810 1.0912 1.1223 Euro in Cdn 1.4890 1.4779 1.4971 1.4704Quotations provided by the Bank of Canada

Read More

UN health agency working to contain Ebola outbreak in Guinea

“The incubation period for all strains of Ebola is between two and 21 days,” said WHO spokesman Gregory Härtl, as he explained today at a press briefing in Geneva that the agency has taken “the maximum incubation period and multiplied it by two to get the length of time needed to ensure no onwards transmission.” “Communication with local communities and their education is of crucial importance,” he stressed. According to WHO, the source of infection has been localized in the south east of Guinea. In Liberia, the seven infected – four of whom have died – are Liberians who had recently travelled to Guinea and were subsequently contaminated. The previously suspected Sierra Leone cases have been tested negative. The Ebola virus first appeared in 1976 in two simultaneous outbreaks in Sudan and Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and it does not normally cause a large number of cases – the largest outbreaks were of approximately 400 cases. However, with no treatment and no cure, it has a very high fatality rate of up to 90 per cent.Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals. In Africa, infection has been documented through the handling of infected chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest.Ebola then spreads in the community through human-to-human transmission, with infection resulting from direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people, and indirect contact with environments contaminated with such fluids.Though smaller than past outbreaks in DRC and Uganda, the current Guinea Ebola cases fit the patterns of all previous outbreaks, said Mr. Härtl, explaining that the virus spread from the rural villages of the rainforest in the south east to the capital Conakry as the infected sought medical attention in the city. Mr. Härtl stressed that in an outbreak the priority is stopping chain transmission and tracing all contacts. “The contacts need to be followed up for a period of 21 days and ensured against inadvertently spreading the disease to someone else,” he explained, adding that 11 health care workers have been confirmed as having contracted Ebola.“WHO has been working both with Médecins sans Frontières and the Ministry of Health to ensure that the proper practices and equipment have been put in place to protect all these healthcare workers from the virus. Personal Protection Equipment has already been shipped, and more is on its way,” said Mr. Härtl.He emphasized that, in public health terms, the current scope of the outbreak does not justify the use of the word “epidemic”. “The WHO is dealing with limited foci, limited geographical area and only a few chains of transmission,” he said.For the time being, the UN health agency does not recommend any particular travel or trade restrictions. read more

Read More