Sea turtle nests on Bald Head Island sets record

first_img Nesting sea turtle mom (Photo: BHI Conservancy) Sea Turtle nest cage, (Photo: Paul Hillbrand) With over 30 years of sea turtle nesting data, the Conservancy confirms that this is the most nests laid on BHI during the month of May since at least 2002 when there were just 15 nests at this time.With the past two years being lower nesting years on BHI, the Conservancy hopes this is a sign that the turtles are set to break their 2016 record high of 102 total nests for the season.There have also been 32 false crawls, which means the mom will crawl up the beach to nest but turn back around before laying her eggs. The Conservancy team has been able to identify 20 of the nesting mothers.Related Article: Donation drive organized in memory of woman killed by gatorSo far all nests have been laid by Loggerhead sea turtles. BHI sees mostly Loggerhead turtles nesting, with the occasional Green turtle, and a Leatherback turtle, the largest of the sea turtle species, in 2010. Originally started over 30 years by volunteers, the BHI Conservancy’s sea turtle protection team patrols the beaches nightly from on UTVs to track, measure and tag the sea turtles, protect their nests with plastic cages, and relocate the nests if necessary.In one night alone the team had 9 sea turtle events – with 7 of those taking place in the three-hour time span of 12:30 a.m. to 3:30 a.m.It’s turning into a busy nesting season along our coast. This week, 21 nests were reported on Topsail Island. 1 of 3 Sea Turtle Team measuring sea turtle shell (Photo: BHI Conservancy) Nesting sea turtle mom (Photo: BHI Conservancy) BALD HEAD ISLAND, NC (WWAY) — Since the season began just a few weeks ago, 22 sea turtle nests have been laid on Bald Head Island.According to a news release from the Bald Head Island Conservancy, the first nest was laid just 16 days ago, keeping the BHI Conservancy team quite busy tagging the sea turtle moms and protecting their nests.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Belville veterans memorial reaches goal to open in time for Veterans Day

first_img “We accomplished this in just over two months with the outpouring of community support,” Bucher said in an email. “The Military Insignia Inserts are in and will be installed in the boulder in the coming week. The boulder should be placed on site within two weeks. The initial engraved brick order will be made on Monday.”Bucher says the entire project will be done for a dedication ceremony on Saturday, Nov. 9. Veterans Day is the following Monday.Click here for more information about ordering a brick for the memorial Rendering of planned veterans memorial at the Brunswick Riverwalk in Belville. (Photo: Town of Belville) BELVILLE, NC (WWAY) — A planned veterans memorial at the Brunswick Riverwalk in Belville should be done in time for Veterans Day.Belville Park Manager Jim Bucher tells WWAY that the project reached its goal of 200 engraved bricks to be laid in the memorial with orders continuing to come in.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Snapchat wants to serve you ads based on objects in your snaps

first_imgAdvertisement Snapchat wants to serve you Ads based on the objects that it can recognize in your snaps.This has been revealed through a patent filed which is an application for a system of advertising that uses object recognition to serve users sponsored filters.According to the patent application, the technology will identify items in users’ pictures, and then offer them image overlays from brands related to these objects. – Advertisement – This is similar to buying advertising space based on keywords in Google searches — but instead of looking for textual data in searches like “headphones” or “shoes,” it’s looking for the objects themselves.The object recognition based photo filters will complement Snapchat’s current geofilters, which offer users custom image overlays based on location. Users can submit geofilter designs themselves for free (for a friend’s wedding, for example), while advertisers have to pay if they want to create a filter to promote a brand or product.last_img read more

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Getting a big break

first_imgCoronation StakesRoyal AscotTIME: 3.45pm, C4ANSWER IN THE LYRICS AFTER ALLWe picked the wrong bloomin’ Irish song yesterday.Alive Alive Oh – was withdrawn within minutes of this column predicting a win for her (surely this column isn’t THAT much of a jinx ??).And when racing began it was No Nay Never who came home a remarkable winner in the opener, having been headed, but the huge two-year-old battled back bravely.The answer was in the lyrics after all !!! But it was the Wild Rover and not Molly Malone…I went to an alehouse I used to frequent, And I told the landlady my money was spent I asked her for credit, she answered me, “Nay”, Saying, “Custom like yours I can have any day”And it’s no, nay, never! No nay never no more And I’ll play the wild rover, No never no moreIt could well turn out to be another great day for the Irish trainers at Royal Ascot and in the feature race, the Coronation Stakes at 3.45, I’m expecting BIG BREAK to turn the tables on her conqueror at the Curragh Just The Judge who beat her into fourth in the Irish 1000 Guineas.There is little to choose in the Star Sports market between the pair and of course Newmarket 1000 Guineas winner Sky Lantern but the horse best supported has been Big Break who wasn’t suited by being drawn out wide at the Curragh and should benefit from more cover today.She is also entitled to improve further having only had the four starts.STAR FORECAST(stake between 0.5 and 10 points)6 points win BIG BREAK (3.45 Royal Ascot)(+0.00 points Thursday)IF IT DOESN’T WORK OUT AT ROYAL ASCOTOne of the biggest jackpots in British history is up for grabs in the EuroMillions lottery on Friday night.Organiser Camelot has said the jackpot in tonight’s draw will be £141m.A single winner would be immediately catapulted into the list of the nation’s wealthiest people.They would instantly become the 572nd richest in the country, according to the Sunday Times Rich List.They would also become the UK’s third biggest National Lottery jackpot winner to date.last_img read more

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STARTERS ORDERS Thursday

first_imgWelcome to Starters Orders. Our new daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Thursday 17 October2.50 WincantonGlenwood Prince 4/1 > 9/47.50 KemptonDuchess Of Seville 13/2 > 5/1last_img

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The Worlds Best Yodeling Cowboy Rides into Rice for Lecture

first_imgShare Contact: Philip Montgomery Phone: (713) 831-4792 The World’s Best Yodeling Cowboy Rides into Rice for Lecture The world’s best yodeling cowboy Don Edwards will pull off the trail drive to sing and lecture about the “cowboyway” at Rice University. His lecture and performance, entitled “Words and Music in Songs of the West,” will be held on Thursday, March 2, at 4 p.m. in 309 Sewall Hall. This will be the second in the lecture and music series Language and Music, presented by the Center for the Study ofCultures and the Rice’s Department of Linguistics.”He (Edwards) may be the world’s best interpreter of cowboy music,” said Sydney Lamb, a professor of linguistics at Rice and a folk musician who regularly performs in Houston, “and he’sdefinitely the world’s best yodeler.” Edwards told the Chicago Sun-Times, in a 1992 interview, that”yodeling came from listening to coyotes and hearing Indiansholler”you mix it up with the Swiss yodels and you have a lot ofvariations.” Edwards is a singer, guitarist and performer of cowboy music, who records for Warner Western Records, a subsidiary of Warner Bros. Records. Western Records was formed in 1992 in response to increasedinterest in cowboys and the music of the Old West. The Library of Congress included some of Edwards’ recordings in its folklore archives, and the National Cowboy Hall of Fame awardedhim the Wrangler Award for Outstanding Traditional Western Music. Although originally from rural New Jersey, Edwards headed for Texas while in his teens, drawn by the mystique of the cowboy life. He did a few rodeos as well as some ranch work, but, “it didn’t take me long to find out that guitar-playing was my thing,” Edwards told Texas Highways in 1991. At 10-years-old, he started playing guitar.He recorded his first record in 1964. He has recorded three albums for Western Records alone. Lamb said Western Records imposed some restrictions on the first two albums regarding song arrangements, stylistic elements and backup instrumentation. But Edwards’ first two records for Western Recordsdid so well that the company gave him free rein for his third one.Edwards pursues an active touring and performing schedule in addition to running a ranch near Weatherford, Texas. While he and his wife are on the road, his mother-in-law, Mary Davis, holds downthe fort, taking care of the cattle and horses. “They’re all spoiled,” she said of the animals, “and they allhave names.”So when Edwards is out singing about the cowboy way, whether at the White Elephant Saloon in Fort Worth or in Sewall Hall, he canrest assured that the livestock are in good hands.Rice University is an independent, coeducational, nonsectarian private university dedicated to undergraduate teaching and graduate studies, research and professional training in selected disciplines. It has an undergraduate student population of 2,584, a graduate and professional student population of 1,489 and a full-time faculty of448. ### AddThislast_img read more

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Prototype provides pedestrian power

first_imgWatch a video demonstration of PediPower at http://youtu.be/AwNpL1zSvVUFollow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated materials:Agitation Squad: http://oedk.rice.edu/Content/Members/MemberPublicProfile.aspx?pageId=1371456&memberId=8124813Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen: http://oedk.rice.eduGeorge R. Brown School of Engineering: http://engr.rice.eduImages for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/04/0506_SHOE-3-web.jpgTyler Wiest attaches a PediPower to a shoe for a demonstration of its power-generating capabilities at Rice University. Photo by Jeff Fitlow http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/04/0506_SHOE-1-web.jpgJulian Castro models the PediPower, an energy-producing prototype to run small electronics. It was invented by senior engineering students at Rice University. Photo by Jeff Fitlow. http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/04/0506_SHOE-2-web.jpgRice University senior engineering students were charged with creating a source of green energy from human motion. The team — from left, Tyler Wiest, Carlos Armada, Julian Castro and David Morilla — created prototype generators mounted to shoes. Photo by Jeff Fitlow.center_img ShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduPrototype provides pedestrian powerRice University students engineer electricity-generating shoes HOUSTON – (May 7, 2013) – A group of Rice University mechanical engineering students are getting a charge out of having the coolest new shoes on campus.As their capstone project that is required for graduation, four seniors created a way to extract and store energy with every step. Their PediPower shoes turn motion into juice for portable electronics and, perhaps someday, for life-preserving medical devices.Cameron, a Houston-based international company, approached the Rice engineering students with the project. The company primarily works on the macroscale as a provider of flow equipment, systems and services for the oil, gas and process industries, but it asked the students to look toward microscale green energy technologies.The Agitation Squad – Carlos Armada, Julian Castro, David Morilla and Tyler Wiest – decided last fall to focus their attention on where the rubber meets the road to create a shoe-mounted generator. Another device to draw energy from the motion of the knee had already been developed and patented and led them to analyze other sources of energy.Working with the Motion Analysis Laboratory at Shriners Hospital for Children in Houston, the team determined the force at the heel delivered far more potential for power than any other part of the foot.“We went to the lab and saw the force distribution across the bottom of your foot, to see where the most force is felt,” Morilla said. “We found it would be at the heel and at the balls of your toes, as you push off. We went with the heel because, unless you’re sprinting, you’re letting gravity do the work.”Their devices as currently designed are admittedly too big for day-to-day wear, but the prototypes developed at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen with the team’s advisers, David McStravick and Omar Kabir, meet the benchmarks set by the company. McStravick is a professor in the practice of mechanical engineering and materials science; Kabir is a senior principle research engineer in corporate technology at Cameron.The prototypes deliver an average of 400 milliwatts, enough to charge a battery, in benchtop tests (and a little less in walking tests, where the moving parts don’t move as far). They send energy through wires to a belt-mounted battery pack. A voltage regulator keeps it flowing steadily to the battery.The PediPower hits the ground before any other part of the prototype shoe. A lever arm strikes first. It is attached to a gearbox that replaces much of the shoe’s sole and turns the gears a little with each step. The gears drive a motor mounted on the outside of the shoe that generates electricity to send up to the battery.“It may be worth looking into having both the heel and the ball of the foot produce power, especially if this shoe could be used while running,” Armada said.The students expect the project to be picked up by another team at Rice in the fall, with the hope they can refine the materials, shrink the size and boost the power output, all of which will get PediPower closer to being a commercial product.“If we could prove that we could produce some usable power, store it in a battery and discharge that battery on a mobile device or an MP3 player, then we could prove this device works,” Armada said. “Now the next team can come in and make it smaller and lighter without sacrificing power.”For now, the team would like to provide enough dependable power for cellphones and other portable electronics. But they’re aware that Cameron has partnered with the Texas Heart Institute to apply its expertise in moving fluids to a new generation of artificial heart pumps, and the students hope their work will contribute to that goal.“Just the fact that you’re relying on human movement to power something that’s critical to your life is a little bit scary,” Armada said. “You sleep for eight hours a day and you’re not moving. You want to make sure you’re making enough power during the day to last. Realistically, this might be more of a device to charge your phone.“Theoretically it would be something you just wear, and you don’t notice it,” he said. “That’s the end goal. If you showed someone the shoe while you’re standing still, they wouldn’t even see the device.”-30- FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more

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Platinum meets its match in quantum dots from coal

first_imgAddThis http://news.rice.edu/files/2014/09/1006_GQD-1-WEB.jpgRice University scientists combined graphene quantum dots, graphene oxide, nitrogen and boron into a catalyst capable of replacing platinum in fuel cells at a fraction of the cost. (Illustration courtesy of the Tour Group/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2014/09/1006_GQD-2-web.jpgAn electron microscope image shows flake-like nanoplatelets made of graphene quantum dots drawn from coal and graphene oxide sheets, modified with boron and nitrogen. The nanoplatelets feature enough edge to make them suitable as catalysts for applications like fuel cells. (Courtesy of the Tour Group/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2014/09/1006_GQD-3-web.jpgA typical nanoplatelet as seen under an electron microscope. The hybrid material made at Rice University shows promise for replacing expensive platinum as a catalyst. (Courtesy of the Tour Group/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2014/09/1006_GQD-4-web.jpgA highly magnified image of a nanoplatelet created at Rice University that combines graphene quantum dots from coal, graphene oxide, nitrogen and boron. The material may serve as a catalyst in fuel cells, replacing expensive platinum. (Courtesy of the Tour Group/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2014/09/1006_GQD-5-web.jpgA scanning electron microscope images shows the rough surface of a graphene quantum dot/graphene nanoplatelet before modification with nitrogen and boron. The nanoplatelets show promise for catalytic applications. (Courtesy of the Tour Group/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,920 undergraduates and 2,567 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just over 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is highly ranked for best quality of life by the Princeton Review and for best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go here. Share2Editor’s note: Links to images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduPlatinum meets its match in quantum dots from coalRice University’s cheap hybrid outperforms rare metal as fuel-cell catalyst HOUSTON – (Oct. 1, 2014) – Graphene quantum dots created at Rice University grab onto graphene platelets like barnacles attach themselves to the hull of a boat. But these dots enhance the properties of the mothership, making them better than platinum catalysts for certain reactions within fuel cells.The Rice lab of chemist James Tour created dots known as GQDs from coal last year and have now combined these nanoscale dots with microscopic sheets of graphene, the one-atom-thick form of carbon, to create a hybrid that could greatly cut the cost of generating energy with fuel cells.The research is the subject of a new paper in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.The lab discovered boiling down a solution of GQDs and graphene oxide sheets (exfoliated from common graphite) combined them into self-assembling nanoscale platelets that could then be treated with nitrogen and boron. The hybrid material combined the advantages of each component: an abundance of edges where chemical reactions take place and excellent conductivity between GQDs provided by the graphene base. The boron and nitrogen collectively add more catalytically active sites to the material than either element would add alone.“The GQDs add to the system an enormous amount of edge, which permits the chemistry of oxygen reduction, one of the two needed reactions for operation in a fuel cell,” Tour said. “The graphene provides the conductive matrix required. So it’s a superb hybridization.”The Tour lab’s material outperformed commercial platinum/carbon hybrids commonly found in fuel cells. The material showed an oxygen reduction reaction of about 15 millivolts more in positive onset potential – the start of the reaction – and 70 percent larger current density than platinum-based catalysts.The materials required to make the flake-like hybrids are much cheaper, too, Tour said. “The efficiency is better than platinum in terms of oxygen reduction, permitting one to sidestep the most prohibitive hurdle in fuel-cell generation — the cost of the precious metal,” he said.Rice graduate student Huilong Fei is the paper’s lead author. Co-authors are graduate students Ruquan Ye, Gonglan Ye, Yongji Gong, Zhiwei Peng and Errol Samuel; research technician Xiujun Fan; and Pulickel Ajayan, the Benjamin M. and Mary Greenwood Anderson Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and of chemistry and chair of the Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, all of Rice.Tour is the T.T. and W.F. Chao Chair in Chemistry as well as a professor of materials science and nanoengineering and of computer science.The Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and its MURI program supported the research.-30-Read the abstract at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn504637yFollow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated Materials:Tour Group: http://www.jmtour.comAjayan Research Group: http://ajayan.rice.eduWiess School of Natural Sciences: http://naturalsciences.rice.eduRice Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering: http://msne.rice.eduImages for download:last_img read more

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Monkey see puzzle monkey do monkey eat

first_imgWatch a video about Games for Primates at http://youtu.be/NQwkLr3TIbAFollow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated Materials:George R. Brown School of Engineering: http://engr.rice.eduHouston Zoo: http://www.houstonzoo.orgImages for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2015/05/0511_MONKEYS-4-web.jpgThe Monkees, a team of Rice University engineering students, built an enrichment device, a puzzle feeder, for the Allen’s swamp monkeys at the Houston Zoo. From left: Nathan Williams, Jack Kaplan, Alexandra Eifert, Emily Lisa and Julio Ledesma. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,888 undergraduates and 2,610 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked among some of the top schools for best quality of life by the Princeton Review and for best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceU. http://news.rice.edu/files/2015/05/0511_MONKEYS-1-web.jpgRice University engineering students have created an enrichment device for Allen’s swamp monkeys at the Houston Zoo. The puzzle makes the monkeys think and work to get nuts and other food from the device. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis ShareEditor’s note: Links to images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduMonkey see puzzle, monkey do, monkey eatRice engineering students develop enrichment device for Houston Zoo primates HOUSTON – (May 5, 2015) – Naku grabs the box hanging from a line and turns and shakes and turns and shakes. He has to work for his food, at least the good stuff.The Allen’s swamp monkey, one of two at the Houston Zoo, was checking out a puzzle built by Rice University engineering students. The rewards were worth it all around: tasty peanuts for Naku and the satisfaction of a job well done for the students.The team known as The Monkees took on a challenge posed by the zoo last fall as part of a freshman engineering class taught by Ann Saterbak, a Rice professor in the practice of engineering education.The goal was to create an interactive enrichment device to engage the swamp monkeys. “They are very smart,” said Helen Boostrom, a senior primate keeper, of Naku, a male, and Oda, a female. “They like to take things apart and mess with things.”The students delivered their final version of the project to the zoo in April and watched with glee as Naku went straight for the device and began to play.“It’s awesome to see how much they love it,” said Emily Lisa, one of the inventors. “It took them a good amount of time to figure out how to use it and tilt the device in the correct way to get the food. So it’s great to see that they not only enjoy it but that it also challenges them.”Lisa and her teammates, Julio Ledesma, Jack Kaplan, Alexandra Eifert and Nathaniel Williams, designed three other prototypes before arriving at the final version. The simple puzzle has three shelves with staggered holes in a heavy-duty plastic box with a clear cover. Zookeepers put nuts or sunflower seeds on the top shelf so the monkeys have to work them down to the hole at the bottom.The device built at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen will join a rotating set of challenges for the monkeys. “They get different enrichment devices every day,” Boostrom said. “Sometimes they’re puzzle feeders like this. Sometimes we make substrate forage piles, where we hide sunflower seeds and other things in wood shavings.“We give them as much variation as we can, because in the wild they’d encounter all kinds of problems. Their habitat would be changing, so we want to be sure they’re exhibiting natural behaviors by challenging them. They have a lot to do here,” she said.The box was designed primarily for Oda, “because if we design it for her, we design it for everyone else,” Kaplan said. “She can unscrew things, so we had to use lock nuts to make sure she couldn’t take our device apart. We also had to make sure there wasn’t a place where they could get a finger or hand stuck.”Not unlike a baby’s rattle, the plastic box is built to be noisy. Corn in the rounded handles keeps Naku and Oda interested even if the food is gone. “If the handles pop off somehow, whatever comes out isn’t going to hurt them if they swallow it,” Eifert said.An early prototype was only partially successful, puzzle-wise. “The problem was, it was completely mobile,” Williams said. “The male figured out that if he submerged it in the pond, which he liked to do, it would fill up with water. When he took it out all the food would rush out with the water.”That’s why the students added a tether, a steel line inside sections of plastic pipe that protect the monkeys from harm. The monkeys can pick up and manipulate the box, but not move it too far. “Even though we knew they were smart, they were a lot cleverer than we gave them credit for,” Williams said.-30- http://news.rice.edu/files/2015/05/0511_MONKEYS-2-web.jpgA Schmidt’s Red Tailed Guenon monkey checks out a tether that holds a feeder puzzle in place. The puzzle built by Rice University students is an enrichment device for monkeys at the Houston Zoo that makes them think through a problem to earn treats. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2015/05/0511_MONKEYS-3-web.jpgNaku, a swamp monkey at the Houston Zoo, checks out a puzzle feeder built by Rice University students. The feeder is one of a collection of enrichment devices that offer monkeys new challenges every day. 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The Medical Community Is Violating Human Rights for Pregnant Women Says Lawyer

first_img Share this article Health A woman holds her new baby during a visit to the Jessie Trice Community Health Center, Inc. in Hialeah, Fla. on September 23, 2009. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) The Medical Community Is Violating Human Rights for Pregnant Women, Says Lawyer By Sarah Le, Epoch Times November 3, 2016 Updated: November 3, 2016  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   center_img Are women and newborn babies being denied basic human rights in hospitals in the United States? Legal advocates say yes.In recent years, there has been a global movement toward increased recognition of women’s rights during childbirth in regards to informed consent/refusal and respect for bodily autonomy.These rights go beyond simply the right to survival of the woman and her baby, said Hermine Hayes-Klein, a lawyer and the founder of Human Rights in Childbirth (HRiC), at an event at Cedars-Sinai hospital in Los Angeles on Sept. 21.“Hospital policies don’t trump human rights,” said Hayes-Klein. “The patient has the right to refuse everything.”The United States spends more than any other country in the world on health care, but maternal and fetal outcomes are among the worst of developed nations.In 1970, cesarean sections made up about five percent of births in the United States. Today, about one third of women give birth by c-section. However, a 2015 study of 194 countries found that a c-section rate of about 19 percent was ideal for the health of both women and newborns. Clearly, many c-sections performed in the United States are unnecessary, said Hayes-Klein.“Around the world, the highest intervention rates occur in for-profit medical settings,” said attorney Alessandra Battisti, based in Italy, in a video for HRiC. “When doctors routinely recommend surgical birth for reasons other than immediate clinical need of the women they are paid to serve, the human right to refuse surgery becomes especially important.”In June, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ (ACOG) Committee on Ethics released a statement on the Refusal of Medically Recommended Treatment During Pregnancy.“Pregnancy is not an exception to the principle that a decisionally capable patient has the right to refuse treatment, even treatment needed to maintain life,” according to the ACOG statement. “Therefore, a decisionally capable pregnant woman’s decision to refuse recommended medical or surgical interventions should be respected.”However, many doctors and hospitals in the United States have policies that inherently violate pregnant woman’s human rights, says Hayes-Klein, such as not treating a woman attempting a vaginal birth following a previous c-section (VBAC) or not treating a woman with a breech baby who has refused a c-section. There is no informed consent if a patient doesn’t have the right to say no.“The law’s not being respected in maternity care, and it’s not going to be until women understand their rights and then demand them,” said Hayes-Klein via a telephone interview with Epoch Times.At Cedars-Sinai, Hayes-Klein told the story of a woman who was kicked out of a Los Angeles hospital—while she was pushing—for refusing a c-section for a breech birth. She went to another hospital, which did not force her to leave, but doctors there refused to assist with the birth, saying that as soon as the baby got stuck, they were going to perform a c-section anyway.The woman’s midwife then helped the woman to get into a semi-squatting position to easily deliver the baby herself onto the bed.“Too frequently, even in wealthy countries, women experience disrespect and abuse during childbirth,” said Dr. Nicholas Rubashkin, an obstetrician-gynecologist and researcher who works in the United States and Hungary, on a video for HRiC. “Doctors wanting to provide women-centered, evidence-based care in this environment often find their hands tied by policies that are outside their control. A pregnant woman can’t fix this broken system alone, but her human rights can shield her against disrespectful care.”But even if a woman demands her rights, a doctor may still override them, which is illegal, says Hayes-Klein. The only recourse is legal action, which can be difficult.“Often women’s damages aren’t recognized as likely to result in a big verdict, and so it’s really hard to find lawyers for those cases,” said Hayes-Klein.The World Health Organization (WHO) released a statement on “The prevention and elimination of disrespect and abuse during facility-based childbirth” in 2015, which states, “Health-care providers at all levels require support and training to ensure that childbearing women are treated with compassion and dignity.”Hayes-Klein again spoke at the Human Rights in Childbirth Europe Summit on October 19 in Strasbourg, France, the home of the European Court of Human Rights. She and other advocates discussed their work to expose women’s healthcare experiences during pregnancy and childbirth and provide support and education to human rights lawyers and others involved.“We’re working on a Know Your Rights campaign globally to develop for each country materials that will help women know what their rights are, understand how they can exercise their rights, know where they can turn if their rights are violated,” said Hayes-Klein.“There’s so much confusion about what women’s rights are, not only for women themselves but also for the providers.” Follow Sarah on Twitter: @dadasarahle Show Discussion Sharelast_img read more

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