Lifting 271 mn out of poverty in 10 yrs India fastest Jharkhand

first_img“Traditionally disadvantaged subgroups such as those living in rural India, Muslims, the Scheduled Castes and Tribes, and young children are still the poorest in India,” said a UNDP official.Shoko Noda, UNDP India Resident Representative, said, “The MPI captures the huge progress India has made in reducing multidimensional poverty across the country, while also providing a more complete picture of who is deprived, how they are deprived, and where they live.”“That the poorest parts of the country are more quickly lifting people out of poverty demonstrates India’s commitment to ensuring no one is left behind, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals and the government’s own priorities.”The ten developing nations for which the comparison is made include countries across income categories: upper middle (Peru), lower middle (Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, Vietnam) and low (Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti).Across the 101 countries, 23.1 per cent of the people are multidimensionally poor. Fifty per cent of multidimensionally poor people are children, and a third are children under age 10 with over 85 per cent of poor children living in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. The MPI captures both the incidence and intensity of poverty. (Image for representational purpose only)India has registered the fastest absolute reduction in the Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) value among ten countries, spanning every developing region, whose combined population is two billion people. And Jharkhand is among the poorest regions in the world improving the fastest. Written by Shalini Nair | New Delhi | Updated: July 12, 2019 12:41:46 pm Jharkhand JAC secondary, intermediate compartmental exams 2019 admit card released, how to download Best Of Express Related News 25 Comment(s) After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach center_img It cites Jharkhand, which reduced multidimensional poverty from 74.9 per cent to 46.5 per cent in the ten years since 2005-06, as an example of the poorest region improving the fastest followed by Rattanak Kiri in Cambodia.Among the four Indian states with the most acute MPI — Bihar, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh — Jharkhand has made the most progress. Overall, India was among three countries where poverty reduction in rural areas outpaced that in urban areas, which as per the report, is an indicator of pro-poor development.The National Family Health Survey round three and four (NHFS 2005-06 & 2015-16) is the source for the comparative data on the indicators.In this period, the report stated,  the incidence of multidimensional poverty in India has almost halved, to 27.9 per cent from 55.1 per cent, lifting 271 million out of poverty — from 640 million to around 369 million. With regards to intensity, the reduction is negligible — from 51.1 per cent to 43.9 per cent — which goes to show that the experience of the poor person, how they face deprivation, hasn’t changed all that dramatically. Poverty index: how Jharkhand reduced its poor the fastest Bail rider for woman held for offensive post: Donate Quran copies Advertising Advertising According to the global MPI 2019 report released Thursday, between 2005-06 and 2015-16, India, lifted 271 million out of poverty, significantly reducing deprivations in many of the ten indicators, particularly in “assets, cooking fuel, sanitation and nutrition”.The MPI captures both the incidence and intensity of poverty. The global MPI tracks 101 countries on deprivations across ten indicators in health, education, and standard of living. Developed in 2010 by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), it looks beyond income poverty and tracks poverty in terms of the deprivation faced by people in their daily lives. Between 2005-06 and 2015-16, India, lifted 271 million out of poverty, significantly reducing deprivations in many of the ten indicators.The report stated: “Among selected countries with a significant reduction in MPI value, India demonstrates the clearest pro-poor pattern at the subnational level: the poorest regions reduced multidimensional poverty the fastest in absolute terms”. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield last_img read more

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Early human testing of iron chelation after brain bleed shows mixed results

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 11 2019A drug that removes excess iron and toxins from the body after a brain bleed did not show significant improvement in recovery or neurological function at three months after intracerebral hemorrhage (stroke), but showed some benefits at six months, according to late breaking science presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2019, a world premier meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease.The breakdown of blood after a brain hemorrhage releases toxic byproducts including iron, which damages the surrounding brain tissue. In animal research, deferoxamine – a drug which removes iron from the body (a process known as iron chelation) – improves recovery and neurological function.The Intracerebral Hemorrhage Deferoxamine (iDEF) Trial is a multicenter double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial conducted at 42 U.S. and Canadian centers. Researchers examined the safety of deferoxamine and whether the drug holds sufficient promise to improve outcome after brain hemorrhage before conducting a large trial to determine its treatment effectiveness. The study enrolled 291 patients (average age 60, 38 percent women) within 24 hours of a brain bleed.Related StoriesWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionResearchers noted: “We saw improvement in recovery between three to six months in both the deferoxamine and placebo treatment groups which suggests that recovery after brain hemorrhage takes a long time, and that it may be better for future studies to consider examining the effects of potential treatments at six months or perhaps later to fully determine the full effects of these treatments,” said Magdy Selim, M.D., Ph.D, professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and chief of the Division of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. “We are reviewing our data carefully to determine if we should conduct a large trial to examine the effectiveness of deferoxamine in improving outcomes at six months after a brain hemorrhage.”Source: https://newsroom.heart.org/news/mixed-results-on-early-human-testing-of-iron-chelation-after-brain-bleed High doses of deferoxamine (62 milligram per kilogram of body weight per day) were toxic to the lungs and were associated with increased incidence of a condition called adult respiratory distress syndrome which leads to a buildup of fluids in the lungs and decreased oxygen levels in the blood, but intermediate doses (32 milligram per kilogram of body weight per day) were safe and well tolerated. The primary result showed that the use of intermediate doses of deferoxamine for three days after brain hemorrhage did not sufficiently improve recovery and neurological function at three months, but patients who received the drug seemed to have better outcomes after six months from the onset of brain hemorrhage in secondary analyses.last_img read more

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New kid on the blockchain Stablecoin promises steady crypto

first_img Seen as more steady because they are pegged to traditional currencies such as the US dollar, stablecoins have been a quiet crypto success, even though questions remain over their reliability.The total value of stablecoins in circulation has more than doubled to $3 billion from $1.4 billion over the past year, according to a study published by Blockchain, a firm which offers wallets for digital currencies.Cryptocurrencies are now rarely used to buy products and services because of their wild price swings, as they dramatically soar or plummet depending on the speculative interest of the moment.The value of the world’s first and best-known cryptocurrency bitcoin, for example, multiplied by 15 in 2017 before plunging 80 percent in 14 months.But this volatility could all change thanks to stablecoins, according to Garrick Hileman, head of research at Blockchain.”They can solve real problems,” he told AFP.According to Tom Shaughnessy, co-founder of cryptocurrency consultants Delphi Digital, a reduction in volatility would allow consumers to buy simple things like a cup of coffee. Explore further The flawsHowever stablecoins also have their doubters.Since its creation in 2014, tether has failed to totally overcome suspicions of manipulation. Some observers suspect that its issuer, the Bitfinex exchange platform, has put more tethers into circulation than the dollars raised in exchange.Despite repeated requests made to Bitfinex, one of the world’s largest cryptocurrency platforms, it has never published its accounts.A study by the University of Texas in June observed that when bitcoin’s prices fell, there was huge buying of bitcoin with tether, which helped stabilise bitcoin’s value. The study suggested that entities linked to Bitfinex were behind the move. Bitfinex has denied allegations of price manipulation.Despite their advantages, stablecoins have two main flaws according to analysts at Intelligent Trading: reliability of the issuing entity and their centralised nature.”No project has been able to come up with a solution that would be universally accepted and provide privacy, security, and decentralisation,” it has argued.Indeed 2018 saw the end of the stablecoin project basis.After raising $133 million in April, a stablecoin record, basis called it a day in December before it had even begun trading, faced with regulatory constraints that it considered insurmountable. Tethered to the dollarIn a sign that stablecoins are gaining in credibility, US investment banking giant JPMorgan Chase earlier this month unveiled a prototype for a digital coin system using blockchain, known as JPM Coin.A total of 26 stablecoins currently exist, while a further 28 excluding JPM Coin are in development. Most of them are expected to launch this year, according to the Blockchain study.The leader stablecoin in terms of tokens in circulation and value is tether, which is designed to always be worth $1.Tether represents more than 95 percent of trading volume in non-volatile digital currencies and 69 percent of their combined value.Taking into account all cryptocurrencies, tether is second only to bitcoin in daily traded volumes and seventh in terms of valuation, according to data provider Coinmarketcap.According to Blockchain’s Hileman, stablecoins should be seen as complementing cryptocurrencies rather than as direct competitors.”Bitcoin may come to be seen as digital gold,” he said, a place to store value, while stablecoins would serve as a means of exchange. © 2019 AFP Volatility in crypto currencies has put many potential investors off As the extreme volatility of cryptocurrencies makes them difficult to depend on for day-to-day use, another type of virtual currency is gaining popularity: stablecoins. Cryptocurrencies: High volatility and returns Crypto, crypto on the wall, who is the steadiest of them all? Citation: New kid on the blockchain: Stablecoin promises steady crypto (2019, February 24) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-kid-blockchain-stablecoin-steady-crypto.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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No Uber no problem Brazil app drives into Sao Paulos nogo zones

first_img Explore further Start-up JaUbra (Uber of slum) has found success providing cab service in parts of Sao Paulo that others consider to risky to enter “The people think that to start out you have to have a lot money, but we started with nothing,” says Landim, 29, sitting in JaUbra’s new location, a modest office they rented with the help of 32,000 reais ($8,300) funding from the local government and 20,000 reais from a start-up investor.”We only had a computer, a telephone, the idea, the creativity and the physical space loaned by a friend,” she says.Despite making 3,000 trips a month and taking 15 percent commission on each journey, JaUbra’s earnings are just enough to keep the family-run business afloat, says Landim, whose brother is also involved. ‘Nobody hassles you’It has not been easy launching a transport app on the outskirts of a city where high crime and yawning inequality go hand in hand. Life expectancy can vary by as much as 23 years between neighborhoods, according to a recent study. Vila Brasilandia, one of the zones inside the district, is ranked as the third most violent in Sao Paulo. Yet JaUbra has not recorded a single assault in the past year. “Since I joined the app, I haven’t even suffered a scratch,” says Nelson Cobertino, who started driving for JaUbra last year. “When people see the (JaUbra) sticker they say ‘it’s from the neighborhood,’ and then nobody hassles you because they know you are meeting a need and they respect that,” says Cobertino, who used to drive for Uber and work in a bank. The US platform—which admits that it can block requests in certain areas and times of the day for security reasons—recently announced plans for a pilot program in Heliopolis, a favela in Sao Paulo’s south, with designated pick-up points to increase its presence on the city’s neglected outskirts. Uber also offers tailored service in Brazil for customers with old smartphones and slow internet connections as well as those who prefer to share their trip to save money. But da Silva is not scared by the competition.”At the beginning everyone thought that we wouldn’t do it, that we would stop,” he says.”But two years later and we’re still here. I’m going to leave my family a legacy for the rest of their lives.” After six months of driving for the US application in the gridlocked city, da Silva launched his own rival service JaUbra in the sprawling northern district of Brasilandia in 2017. Since then some 50 drivers have registered and da Silva hopes to expand to other no-go areas of the metropolis of 12 million—the city with the highest number of Uber users in the world.Uber and other ride-sharing apps “started to veto the neighborhoods considered risky and difficult to access. But as we are already here, we don’t have any trouble,” says da Silva as he drives down the street where he was born 50 years ago, tooting his horn to greet residents. Few outsiders dare to enter parts of Brasilandia where many of its 265,000 inhabitants live in favelas made up of precarious multi-storey constructions squeezed into a labyrinth of streets covering the hills 15 kilometers (nine miles) from the center of Sao Paulo. Rampant crime and poor internet access mean many Uber drivers do not accept journeys to the district. And for those living in Brasilandia, the app is impossible to access from various points as AFP discovered during a recent visit.Other ride-sharing apps do not venture there at night either, complained a resident, who depends on public transport.Life changingAs soon as word got out that JaUbra entered the neighborhoods of winding streets without numbers, da Silva noticed that the majority of his clients were residents who called him to take them to the doctor, the fresh food market or funk dances at the weekend.As the business grew, da Silva started to bring in other drivers in the area to help meet demand. “There are places here that are difficult for public transport to access and that’s made us the only option for many people who were missing doctor appointments,” says da Silva’s daughter, Aline Landim, who gave up a bank job to dedicate herself full-time to JaUbra. Seeing the business’s potential, Landim invested the pay-out she got from her former employer into JaUbra, which her father was running out of a garage and recording bookings on pieces of paper. Brazilian Alvimar da Silva (R), with daughter Aline Landim, created JaUbra (Uber of slum) to serve poor Sao Paulo communities that Uber avoids Citation: No Uber, no problem: Brazil app drives into Sao Paulo’s no-go zones (2019, April 11) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-uber-problem-brazil-app-sao.html © 2019 AFP Sao Paulo court backs taxi drivers, bans Uber This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Now they have their own app and are on the verge of migrating to a more sophisticated platform for which they have 500 drivers interested. When Alvimar da Silva realized Uber did not reach some of the more dangerous, far-flung areas of Brazil’s biggest city Sao Paulo, he saw an opportunity: if the popular ride-sharing service did not go there, he would.last_img read more

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Abortion of abnormal foetus cant be denied even if gestation is beyond

first_img Next Abortion of abnormal foetus can’t be denied even if gestation is beyond 20 weeks: HCThe woman, in her petition filed through advocate Sneha Mukherjee, had challenged the Constitutionality of sections 3(2)(b) and 5(1) of the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act, 1971.advertisement Press Trust of India New DelhiJuly 16, 2019UPDATED: July 16, 2019 23:10 IST Right to terminate an abnormal pregnancy cannot be denied merely because gestation has continued beyond 20 weeks, said the Delhi High Court. (File Photo)HIGHLIGHTSRight to terminate an abnormal pregnancy cannot be denied because gestation has continued beyond 20 weeks: Delhi HCThe ruling came after a woman challenged the Constitutionality of sections 3(2)(b) and 5(1) of the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act, 1971The bench, while allowing her plea, also took into account the report of the medical board constituted by AIIMS on the high court’s directionRight to terminate an abnormal pregnancy cannot be denied merely because gestation has continued beyond 20 weeks, the Delhi High Court has said while allowing a 25-week pregnant woman’s plea to abort her foetus which had enlarged kidneys and was not expected to survive.A bench of Chief Justice D N Patel and Justice C Hari Shankar said the section of the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act which prohibits abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy even if the foetus is abnormal, and the provision which relaxes this restraint if there is an immediate threat to the life of the mother, have to be considered cumulatively and not in isolation.”Seen thus, we are convinced that, even in a case where the condition of the foetus is, as in the present case, incompatible with life, the rigour of section 3(2) deserves to be relaxed, and the right to terminate the pregnancy cannot be denied merely because gestation has continued beyond 20 weeks.”Law, needless to say, cannot be construed in a manner incompatible with life,” the court said Friday and permitted the woman to terminate her pregnancy.The bench, while allowing her plea, also took into account the report of the medical board constituted by AIIMS on the high court’s direction.The woman, in her petition filed through advocate Sneha Mukherjee, had challenged the Constitutionality of sections 3(2)(b) and 5(1) of the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act, 1971.While section 3(2)(b) of the Act prohibits termination of a pregnancy of over 20 weeks, section 5(1) allows abortion if there is an immediate threat to the life of the motherThe petition had contended that the 20 weeks stipulation for a woman to avail abortion services under section 3(2) (b) of the Act may have been reasonable when the section was enacted in 1971 but has ceased to be reasonable today where technology has advanced and it is perfectly safe for a woman to abort at any point during the entire period of pregnancy.”Secondly, determination of foetal abnormality in many cases can only be done after the 20th week and by keeping the ceiling artificially low, women who obtain reports of serious foetal abnormality after the 20th week have to suffer excruciating pain and agony because of the deliveries that they are forced to go through,” the plea had said.The ceiling of 20 weeks is therefore “arbitrary, harsh, discriminatory and violative of Articles 14 and 21 of the Constitution of India”, it had contendedThe plea had challenged section 5 of the Act to the extent it states that termination of a more than 20-week pregnancy be permitted only if it was immediately necessary to save the life of the mother.It had claimed that “as written, the MTP Act encourages desperate women, who learn about a foetal abnormality after the 20th week, to seek out unsafe abortions from untrained medical personnel”.Illegal abortions are the third leading cause of maternal death in India and account for 13 per cent of maternal deaths worldwide, the petition had said.ALSO READ | Green court pulls up NHAI over highway projects leading to generation of dust clouds in AgraALSO READ | Babri demolition case: Special judge seeks 6 months from SC to conclude trialALSO WATCH | War over Jai Shri Ram escalates in Bengal, Kumaraswamy seeks floor test, says he govt has numbers; moreFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byPrakriti Sharmalast_img read more

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Osteoporosis Risks Symptoms and Treatment

first_img Weight-bearing exercise can help keep bones strong and prevent or slow osteoporosis progression. Credit: Shutterstock Sex: Women are more likely to develop osteoporosis than men, because women have less bone tissue and lose bone faster after menopause. Consuming adequate amounts of foods rich in calcium and vitamin D throughout life. Ethnicity: White and Asian women have the highest risk of osteoporosis, while African American and Hispanic women have a lower risk. Family history: People whose parents had a hip fracture may be more likely to develop the disease. Getting regular weight-bearing exercise. Being a couch potato: Not getting enough physical activity or too much bed rest following an injury, illness or surgery weakens bones over time. Osteoporosis treatment and medications People with advanced osteopenia as well as those with osteoporosis need medication to reduce their risk of fractures. Bisphosphonates are usually the first drugs used to treat osteoporosis, but while they help slow bone loss, they don’t help build new bone. These drugs include alendronate (Fosamax), risedronate (Actonel) and ibandronate (Boniva). Studies have shown that alendronate can reduce the risk of spine and hip fractures by up to 50%, Rosen said. Once a person has started treatment for osteoporosis, bone-density testing should be repeated every two to three years to monitor how the density is changing and whether treatment is working, Rosen said. For severe osteoporosis, patients may need one of three medications given by injection that actually build new bone, Rosen said. These include teriparatide (Forteo), abaloparatide (Tymlos) and romosozumab (Evenity). But after a year on these bone-building drugs, a patient needs to take bisphosphonates; otherwise, all the bone-density gains will be lost, Rosen said. In addition to medication, people with osteoporosis should aim to include 1,200 milligrams of calcium a day in their diet, from food or supplements (preferably calcium citrate), Rosen said. He also recommends taking 1,500 to 2,000 International Units (IU) of supplemental vitamin D each day. Being physically active is also beneficial for people with osteoporosis. Rosen recommends regular workouts that include weight-bearing aerobic activity, as well as strength training, balance and posture exercises. Additional resources: Unhealthy habits: Smoking and consuming too much alcohol can both increase bone loss. Nutrition: Eating a diet that’s low in calcium and vitamin D increases osteoporosis risk. Medical problems: Numerous health conditions and diseases can also increase a person’s risk for osteoporosis. Osteoporosis symptoms and diagnosis Osteoporosis may cause no symptoms in its early stages, and as a result, the disease can go unnoticed for decades. Some visible signs of osteoporosis may be a loss of height and a curve in the upper back, which may cause stooped posture. A “dowager’s hump” may occur when several vertebrae collapse from osteoporotic fractures in the spine. Other symptoms may include back pain, from a fracture or a collapsed vertebra in the spine, or tooth loss, if osteoporosis has affected the jawbone. Hip fracture is another serious consequence of osteoporosis. About 20% of older adults who fracture a hip die within one year from complications of the broken bone or the surgery needed to repair it, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. Doctors may perform a bone mineral density (BMD) test to determine if a patient has osteoporosis, according to the Mayo Clinic. The test uses a special X-ray machine to measure the mineral content at three different bone sites, typically the hip, the spine and the top of the femur. The scan can reveal if a person has low bone mass at any of these three bone sites by comparing the patient’s bone density to the normal bone density in a healthy 30-year-old person of the same sex. BMD testing is recommended for women who are 65 or older and for women 50 to 64 who have certain risk factors for the disease. Men over the age of 70 or younger men with risk factors should also be screened for osteoporosis. Osteoporosis risk factors The following factors can increase a person’s risk of developing osteoporosis, according to the Cleveland Clinic. center_img Age: Bones typically become thinner and weaker with age. How bone changes over time The body is continually breaking down small areas of old bone tissue, a process called bone resorption, and replacing that old tissue with new bone tissue. During childhood and adolescence, new bone is deposited faster than old bone is removed. This makes bones larger, heavier and denser. Peak bone mass, or when bones reach their maximum density and strength, typically occurs around age 30 for both sexes. Around age 35, bone breakdown occurs faster than the replacement by new bone, causing a gradual loss of bone mass, according to the National Institute on Aging. Women undergo more-rapid bone loss in the first few years after menopause (around age 51) than in their 30s and 40s because the ovaries produce much less estrogen, a hormone that protects against bone loss, according to The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Men in their 50s and 60s also start to lose bone mass, but at a slower rate than women do. It’s not until ages 65 to 70 that men and women begin losing bone mass at about the same rate. For that reason, osteoporosis is more common in women. The condition affects about 25% of women and 5% of men ages 65 and over, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Can osteoporosis be prevented? The more bone a person builds early in life, the better that individual can resist bone loss later on. Prevention should start when people are younger, during their peak bone-building years, with the following steps, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation: Review this list of calcium-rich foods from the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center. Osteoporosis bones are porous and weak compared to healthy bones that are more dense. Credit: Shutterstock Download a helpful brochure from Osteoporosis Canada on managing osteoporosis through exercise. Osteoporosis is a common disease that makes bones weak, thin, brittle and more likely to break. The condition typically occurs in women after menopause and can increase the risk of fractures, especially in the hip, spine and wrist, according to the National Institutes of Health. The condition is often called a “silent disease” because bone loss can happen slowly and without any warning signs. People may not be aware they have osteoporosis until they break a bone, lose height or develop hunched posture. About 10 million Americans have osteoporosis, and another 44 million have low bone mass, or osteopenia, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation.Advertisement There are a number of factors that may lead to osteoporosis, said Dr. Harold Rosen, an endocrinologist and director of the Osteoporosis Prevention and Treatment Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. One such factor is the accelerated bone loss that occurs after menopause, he said. Men also lose bone as they age, normally once they’re in their 60s and 70s, Rosen said. Some men think osteoporosis affects only women, but it strikes men too, he explained. Low calcium intake and low vitamin D levels in the body can also lead to bone loss, Rosen told Live Science. The body needs a good supply of calcium and other minerals to form bone, and vitamin D helps absorb calcium from food and incorporate the nutrient into bone. In addition, unhealthy habits, such as smoking and excessive drinking, can speed up bone loss, he said. Bone Density Decreases in SpaceBone loss is a serious issue that has plagued astronauts since the dawn of the Space age. In the microgravity environment bones are remodeled with a decrease in mineral density. Good nutrition, increased vitamin D intake and exercise are used to battle the issue aboard the ISS.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65900-osteoporosis.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:4102:41Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball02:31Surgical Robotics00:29Video – Giggly Robot关闭  Learn more about osteoporosis in men from the National Institutes of Health. Body size: Petite and thin people are at greater risk of this condition because they have less bone to lose than people with larger frames and more body weight. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, such as avoiding smoking and limiting alcohol consumption, reduces bone loss. Medications: Using certain drugs on a long-term basis can lead to bone loss. These medicines include corticosteroids, such as prednisone; heparin, a blood thinner; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a class of antidepressants; and aromatase inhibitors, used to treat breast cancer. This article is for informational purposes only and is not meant to offer medical advice. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoSecurity SaversWindows Users Advised To Do This TodaySecurity SaversUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryMeal Kit Wars: 10 Tested & Ranked. See Who WonTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryUndolast_img read more

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Lokpal would have prevented Rafale scam Anna Hazare

first_imgJanuary 21, 2019 COMMENT SHARE SHARE SHARE EMAIL Press Trust of IndiaThe Rafale “scam” would not have happened if the Lokpal was in place, social activist Anna Hazare said here on Monday, announcing indefinite hunger strike from January 30 over his unmet demands for farmers and implementation of the anti-corruption law.The veteran anti-graft leader slammed the Centre for not implementing the Lokpal and Lokayuktas Act, 2013, despite an order of the Supreme Court, saying he felt the country was in “danger” of slipping towards “autocracy”.This will be his third hunger strike over the demand of Lokpal in the last eight years. He sat on an indefinite hunger strike at the Ramleela ground here for the first time in April 2011. New Delhi: 21/01/2019: Social activist Anna Hazare addressing the media on farmers issue , in New Delhi on Monday . Photo: Sushil Kumar Verma /The Hindu   –  THE HINDU COMMENTS Lokpal would have prevented Rafale scam, says anti-graft activist Published onlast_img read more

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